1920 Chicago American Giants

A Calendar, Including Newspaper Clippings, of the 1920 Chicago American Giants

1920 Chicago American Giants Games

Stories are placed in order of the date they appeared.

January 3, 1920

Chicago, IL
"Pitfalls of Baseball - Written Exclusively for the Chicago Defender by Andrew ('Rube') Foster, Manager of the Famous American Giants Baseball Team - In again taking up this subject I am going to touch on the disadvantage clubs have had to encounter to keep the game in front of the people. Some have had good intentions, meant well, many times hoping against hope that some unforseen miracle would happen to enlighten them on their way; that unforseen hand has no appeared. When it does come you will find that few Colored men will be interested in the clubs. When you scan the list of the past and present owners of Colored Clubs, you will find among them, men who are not due any success, with a few exceptions. To be successful in anything, one must pattern after systems and methods of men who have made success in the same line of busines. This you cannot put into the heads of those that want to promote the game. A practice among the various club owners has been to take men from different clubs, many times after they have drawn money from the club they are leaving. It has gotten so bad managers do not trust players, nor do the players trust the managers. It's folly for one to teach a player to jump and not pay the manager he leaves and expect that same player to be honest with him. When some one persuades the same man to leave him, disgusted, he will wire you, 'If you pay such a club, I will not play for you.' This stopped it for a while, but each club adopted the habit of taking each other's men until they have so complicated things they do not play each other. - Organized Baseball Great Pattern - In organized baseball each club secures men from different clubs. It must be an agreement between the club owners that a player is the property of the club who retains his services until released. There is no ball club in the country that can secure his services. Even the big leagues do not tamper with different clubs' players. With all the money invested in their clubs, they have deemed it necessary to form some agreement to work by protecting each other's rights. Yet our club owners laugh at such protection and have year after year done just the opposite. - Players Do Not Want Organization - I have talked with several players and they asked me, did I not think organization would hurt their chances as to salaries. When the club owners get together they will pay what they please; we do not want organizations. I said if you ever expect to really make any money out of baseball it will be done through organization. There are several players playing ball that get more to play one season than the salary list of any three Colored clubs at the present time. They play under organization. Has it hut them? Do you realize that if protection was given men there would be money put into baseball, parks would be built, that it would offer inducements to players to try and develop, knowing there was some future attached to their profession. - Assets of Our Clubs - The time has passed when you can camouflage the public. The public has been wised up to many things. Now it's up to the men who want to continue to give the people something besides bunk. There are not four Colored Clubs North that could not go out of the business today and lose nothing but the uniforms they had last season; yet they will parade around and tell you they own a ball club. Clubs like the A.B.C.s, Detroit, Kansas City, Royal Giants, and Cuban Stars have never had a dime invested beyond their uniforms and advance money. It is natural for them, with the expense of only salaries, to be in a position to do much damage to the clubs that are burdened with heavy overhead expense. Admitting that the clubs are important to the success of both parties, one would not expect the club with the heavy expense to compete with the clubs with apparently no expense; yet they must do more, and have. - Ball Parks Necessary - It is very necessary that we have parks to play in. Without them there would be no incentive for one to choose baseball as a profession. Yet these parks must not be burdened too heavy as when they go baseball North will pass along, as the building restrictions are such and real estate so high that you could not expect Colored owners to promote such an expensive plant just to be giving employment to a profession when it must be at a loss. Yet, you cannot get the men to come together and try to cement some plans for the betterment of the game. - Organization is Sure to Come - We cannot get along without organization. Neither will we have sufficient parks to play in to warrant paying greater salaries than we are at present unless we organize. There are thousands of dollars ready for such an organization. The money will naturally be supported better than the American Association, whose salary limit is $5,000 per month. Then will come the cry that it's a shame that all this money goes into the hands of the whites. Yet we will be the ones at fault. They can easily triple the present salaries and make money, as they will systemize it, build sufficient parks and give employment to many hundred Colored players. There is no hope to even maintain the standard that we have reached. Rentals of all parks have gone up. At any minute the leases of present parks can be terminated. Many Colored men with money have begged to get into the game, but they want it patterned after the way leagues are conducted. - Last Attempt to Get Owners Together - This will be the last time I will ever try and interest Colored club owners to get together on some working basis, I have so often been refused the necessary capital, not desiring to give to others the chance of monopolizing Colored baseball, but they are not going to continue, to wait on me with their money. They can do so and leave me where I am. I have made the effort, it's now up to the ones that expect to permanently figure in baseball to get together."

January 10, 1920

Chicago, IL
"Pitfalls of Baseball - Written Exclusively for the Chicago Defender by Andrew ('Rube') Foster, Manager of the Famous American Giants Baseball Team - In one of my previous articles I asked that the owners of clubs write for the plan of an organization or working agreement between the various clubs. In this plan we were to have a regular Western Circuit, composed of Chicago, Indianapolis, Cincinnati, Detroit, St. Louis, Kansas City, the Eastern circuit to be composed of Pittsburg, Cleveland, Washington, Baltimore, Philadelphia and New York, both to be two separate organizations, the same as National and American Leagues, the winner of each circuit to meet the winner in a world's championship series. This would have been the salvation of baseball. But to date I have received but one letter that would be interesting, that letter came from Washington. - Fans Due Consideration - It would have been in keeping with the times for such a circuit as named above to do something concrete as a stepping stone to success; that would warrant the continuance of the patronage that they have enjoyed, based solely on their loyalty to the Race. This cannot be kept at the present stand; there is something the people want, that their patronage demands, something that would make them appreciate their children entering a profession that would equal the earning capacity of any other profession, and that thing can be done only as the 128 leagues operated by the whites, that have measured their efforts with permanent success, so much so that a graduate from Yale, Princeton and many large medical schools and colleges of law have laid aside their college professions to become ball players, merely because it paid them better to do so. We can do the same thing, but only in patterning after the system of success used by them. A better circuit could not be arraned than the one outlined, even if we only got the support of Colored people. The smallest Colored Population in either city is 50,000, running to 150,000. They would rally around any progressive move, the same as they have rallied around us, knowing we were doing nothing, with hopes for our advance from the old system of parading under false pretenses. - Nothing Invested in Baseball - I have made baseball a study. My ready knowledge of the things accomplished by the different clubs made it possible for me to write these articles. Did you know that Hilldale, Royal Giants, Indianapolis, Kansas City, Detroit, Chicago Giants, Dayton and hundreds of other ball clubs, wonderful investments as owners of clubs, have no assets that you can realized fifty dollars as a load; that the Lincoln Giants, St. Louis and Chicago were the only places with assets; that the assets of the American Giants cost an expenditure of more money than all the Colored parks combined; that it was built new from the ground at a cost greater than the combined cost of all the Negro parks? I want to speak some cold, hard facts to the men that refused to cooperate with such a move, knowing that they have permanently erased their chances to permanently figure in baseball, and very soon you will see these progressive owners of bunk baying their way to see baseball played by Colored clubs. Cost of ball parks and the advanced price of real estate in all large cities have doubled in price; the cost of materials, workers and everything necessary to operate a ball park or club has advanced 50 per cent. This will require many thousand dollars to even build a park. If such money could be secured, the building restrictions are such that in none of the large cities could a permit be secured. First you have to get consent to build from the property owners that surround the ground. As no Colored person owns any place, around any available space (north), this permit can only be had through the whites. Thus they are eliminated by circumstances. Even were such conditions eliminated, the amount of money necessary to operate a club, you would only find a man escaped from the insane asylum that would put money into such a proposition, not knowing where they were to get off. I have fought against delivering Colored baseball into the control of whites, thinking that with a show of patronage from the fans we would get together. The get-together efford has been a failure. In justice to myself and the many players that will eventually benefit by ownership with system money and parks, admitting that I cannot prevent it much longer, as in the past, I had better see that the snow does not stay in my yard after these many hard years of effort."

January 17, 1920

Chicago, IL
"Rube Foster Wants 'Get Together' Meet of All Baseball Owners. - 'Andy' says Organized Effort Is Our Only Salvation Magnates of the West Should Meet Owners of the East, Pick an Aribtration Board and From This Agreement Draw Up a Working Agreement for All to Abide By. - By Charles D. Marshall. - Organized baseball is on and Andrew Rube Foster is at the helm. Or, we might say that this great captain of the national game has started the ball to rolling to which I think the forming of a Colored baseball league may be the outcome. In an article published in a Chicago paper recently, Mr. Foster had the following to say: I am going to make the effort to arrange to have all the owners in the East to meet all the owners in the West, either at Chicago or New York, at a certain date, pick an arbitration board from experienced men of business, and from the agreement draw a working agreement for all of us to abide by, the signers of such an agreement to deposit $500 in good faith that they will live up to such an agreement. It is not a proposition to exchange players. Each club will be allowed to retain their players, but cement a partnership in working for the organized good of baseball. Conducted on the same identical plan as both big leagues and all minor leagues, even the semi-pro leagues, the outcome would be the East would be the same as National League, the West as American League, the winner of the majority of games in the East to meet the Western winners in a real world's championship. This will pave the way for such champion team eventually to play the winner among the whites. This is no more than possible. "Only in uniform strength is there permanent success. I invite all owners to write for information on this proposition. It is open to all." - Andy's Plan a Most Plausible One. - So far as the baseball fan is concerned, the above plan seems a most plausible one, for in my rounds I have discovered that nearly every lover of baseball, player and magnate is very enthusiastic over this brilliant idea of having organized baseball among the colored clubs, both East and West. There is no doubt of the fact that a new and greater interest will be taken in baseball. A guaranteed protection of money must be assured to the new owners of clubs these days, and some sort of a get-together must be brought about at once. Magnates are not going to take the risk on clubs and parks where there is no assets, as they have in the past. It is my opinion that a Western circuit or league of ball will shortly be formed comprising Chicago, Indianapolis, Cincinnati, Detroit, St. Louis and Kansas City, and an Eastern circuit to be composed of Pittsburgh, Cleveland, Washington, Baltimore, Philadelphia, and New York, both to be two separate organizations, the same as a National and American League, the winner of each circuit to meet the winner in a world's championship series. If such a step is taken the salvation of baseball is assured. As I have always said, such a move will be the real stepping stone to success. There is no doubting the fact that nearly every colored ball park in the cities mentioned enjoy a large patronage each season, but the question is, will they continue if something is not done to strengthen the present interest? I say it will not stand unless organized baseball is put into action. So, when a great leader like Rube Foster offers to share his knowledge and costly experience for the betterment of each and every owner of baseball clubs, I think that there should be an enthusiastic rally to the support of the idea and have a meeting and make every possible effort to get organized ball on the go by the summer of 1920. - C.I. Taylor's Return to Great Game an Event. The return to the baseball world of C.I. Taylor, owner and manager of the famous Indianapolis A.B.C.'s next season, as announced by the scribes may do much toward the assurance of organized baseball during the season of 1920, as Taylor has long been known as a power and a great guidance in the national game. But some one has put the rumor on the rounds about the hot stove league that Taylor is much-opposed to organized ball, and others who claim to be on the inside track say that Taylor is always out for anything that is for the good of the sport. Being personally acquainted with the stellar magnate, I feel safe in saying that Taylor is always in favor of the thing that's fair and especially clean in sport, if it will tend to make the game progressive. But the return of C.I. to the diamonds will no doubt cause many a fan to become overjoyed and team with delight and expectation of a rousing season of baseball. You know when Taylor gets into the game, he always makes it interesting for Foster and the whole country, and everybody enjoys a real season of real baseball. There will be some hot battling between Detroit, Chicago and Indianapolis, for Taylor will certainly give Pete Hill and Mr. Foster much to worry about."

Chicago, IL
"Pitfalls of Baseball - Written Exclusively for the Chicago Defender by Andrew ('Rube') Foster, Manager of the Famous American Giants Baseball Team - In my previous articles I have dealt with many things that to my way of thinking have hindered our progress; to all of this there can be no crime, without a reason for such, and in this article I will try and explain what has shown the caliber of men who want to bask in the limelight as progressive leaders of clubs. Lack of Cooperation a Disgrace - In the West we manager often disagree, yet we eventually come to an agreement, forgetting the differences where they affect the welfare fo the game, each time before any great wrong is done, that we will cooperate and stand by any plan agreed on, is a moral certainty, with our Eastern owners it is different. Can you imagine the benefits to be derived from such, to be such a hard task, those familiar with our troubles wonder why we cannot agree. No chain is stronger than its weakest link. Knowing this, I made efforts long before the articles were written, to try and get Nat C. Strong, Eastern booking agent, controlling all the available parks, to play in New York; to let's all meet together, East and West, formulate an agreement for better working conditions, salaries to remain, each club to retain its present players. He answered back, he wanted something done, but the men who are at present identified with the Eastern clubs are an IMPOSSIBILITY, that there were several owners, managers and players they would never do business with again. - Why such a Disagreement? This disagreement dates back to the existence of Colored clubs; it is deeply rooted; there will be no peace until the men now connected give way to different owners. The players question is the root of all the trouble. Managers have gone after the playing season and taken the main men of each other's club; these players oftimes owed the past owner money; naturally this broadened the feelings of the owners. Results, they would not play against each other. Even the Western clubs have done the same to Eastern clubs, yet they do not tamper with the Western players of Western clubs. This has got to such a condition that the leading clubs East do not meet, nor will the Western clubs meet any of the Eastern clubs. If you have taken your club East, win many games, the owner try to take the men away from you, bring about dissatisfaction between you and your men; so much so you avoid going there. - What Getting Together Would Mean - Had the Eastern men accepted the proposal, the bitter feelings that exist would have been eliminated, a working agreement respecting each other's right, a chance to see all the clubs meet, the securing of places fit to play, then the launching of a league. But they refused such, desiring to fight each other. Now it's the survival of the fittest. You kill my dog, I will kill your cat. One would not think such IGNORANCE existed in the MODERN AGE. - Ball Players vs. Owners - Ball players have had no respect for their word, contracts or moral obligations, yet they are not nearly as much to blame as the different owners of clubs. These owners baited the men away from the different clubs, telling them it's money that you want, you had better get it while getting is good. He raises the salary, and the player jumps. About one in every hundred pays the money back voluntarily. The players think better salaries should be paid, often saying: 'Well, if you played so and so you would have made money to pay more, or pay what you promised.' They do not realize that their actions in disrupting another club is the prime factor in not getting what they should, as one never knows how long he will have a club."

February 6, 1920

Kansas City, MO
"Plan to Entertain League - Kansas City, Missouri, February 6 - Felix Payne, Clarence Houston and Attorney Calloway are planning to entertain the National Baseball League delegation which meets here February 13 and 14. A smoker and an auto drive is on the program."

"Southern Baseball Cancelled - New York, February 6. - Baseball, which has always been such a tremendous attraction at the Breakers, Palm Beach, Florida, was eliminated this season. The players who were to trim for the annual series were much disappointed when at the last moment the contracts were broken."

"Kansas City Selected for Meeting of Baseball Magnates - Baseball fans all over the country will watch with interest next week the meeting of the National Baseball League, which is meet at Kansas City, Missouri, February 13 and 14. A call has been issued and following directors of baseball clubs of the West will be present: Andrew "Rube" Foster, American Giants; C.I. Taylor, A.B.C.'s, Indianapolis, Indiana; John Matthews, Dayton Marcos, Dayton, Ohio; John (Tenny) Blount, Detroit Stars, Detroit, Michigan; J.L. Wilkinson, Kansas City; A. Mills, St. Louis, Missouri; Joe Green, Chicago Giants. Mr. Foster will also represent the Cuban Stars, having the proxy of Mr. Tinti Molina. Purpose of the Meeting - For a number of years the Chicago Defender has urged that the owners of the various baseball clubs of standing get together and formulate plans for a national league. The idea has had the endorsement of Andrew "Rube" Foster and no one has worked more faithful than the Chicago 'chief' to make the meeting possible. A tentative schedule will be drawn, a protective aggreement is signed, a working basis fair to each club will be originated. Not only will managers be present, but others interested in baseball and its success will have an opportunity to address the meeting at its open sessions. Cement Foundations for League - This meeting will likely develop the foundation for a league. With representation from Detroit, Dayton, St. Louis, Kansas City, Chicago and Indianapolis it is thought that there is nothing to daunt the promoters. Such a league was not possible for this season, as not enough of the managers have long enough leases on their parks. Sports Writers to be Present. - Dave Wyatt, Indianapolis Ledger; Charles Marshall, Indianapolis Freeman, and Cary B. Lewis, Chicago Defender, will be present to represent their respective papers. Writers on the St. Louis and Kansas City papers will be present and act as hosts for the visitors. Felix Payne, one of the big fans of the West, will entertain the 'boys' from the Windy City. The managers of the clubs declare that no money will be spared this season to give the fans the best clubs in the history of their organization."

February 7, 1920

Chicago, IL
"American Giants Ready For the Bell. - With His Hat in the Ring the Mighty Rube Foster to Give Eye for Eye, Tooth for Tooth - Baseball Situation Deplorable. - Chicago, Illinois - Special to the Freeman. - So much has been said concerning the future of American Giants, efforts have been made to have some dope on the outlook of the coming season of America's premier club, American Giants, and Rube Foster gives out this information: American Giants, is the same classy ball club. The Giants will, as usual, have the same great playing strength, that has always characterized their wonderful playing, instead of, being weaker, they will boom up stronger than the past season, contrary to the dope handed out by some of those that thought it possible to wreck the ball club, instead, they will see their own ball club wrecked, these players have signed to play at Chicago: Jim Brown and George Dixon, catchers; Leroy Grant, Bingo DeMoss, Dick Lundy, Bobby Williams, Dave Malarcher, John Reese (Hilldale), Oscar Charleston, Judy Gans, Tom Williams (Hilldale), Tom Johnson, String Bean Williams, Dave Brown, in addition to this, Cristóbal Torriente will either be transferred to Kansas City or Detroit. It is impossible to assemble a better club. - Rube to Give Eye for Eye, Tooth for Tooth. - All winter long I have tried to get the different managers of ball clubs to get together and respect obligations of player on the different clubs, showed the benefits that would suit. The answer came from some clubs. Bolden of Hildale, Conners of Kansas City Monarchs, in trying to induce players I had to leave. For a time they gave encouragement to the offers, some signing contracts. This widened the breach between them and me, and from now on, it will be the survival of the fittest, any game that they know, anything that they can invent in their attack on me, I know confidently well, that in the end I will be victorious. The tactics I will use are distasteful to me, but to get quick results, when reasoning and common sense are dead issues, one must resort to the danger for fire, what is good for the goose is good for the gander. - Few Western Players Would Go East. - There is no denying the fact that playing conditions are far superior West than the East, that the owners West are more conservative and can be relied upon to stand any kind of gaff. Many players who have been published to go East are certain to remain in the West. I have contracts from the two stars that are supposed to come. These men I know will not go away. - This Baseball Situation Deplorable. - Conditions as they exist, the causes have already time and again been explained, the simple arrangement allowing each man to retain what players he had, an agreement to respect the playing contracts, and an effort to boost baseball, was laughed at. The men, especially Bolden and Connors, wanted to take players regardless as how much money they owe in a contract or the contract. They have tried and will see their efforts as nothing when these same efforts are not on them. They will see their great mistake. - Are Eastern Men Reliable? - Last season the celebrated lines of Incorporation had the Detroit Club come there under guarantee. It rained the last day. Why the manager did not even show up, knowing the club was to leave at 6 p.m., also that they owed them money. Detroit left, they did not write, and the money had to be taken out of there and later on Detroit. They forgot to write a business account. That will never happen with the clubs out here. Now they say they want my players, which is a joke, and many other players. - My Hat Is In the Ring. - When they started after me, they have started a battle that must be a finish. I have had, and have not the highest priced ball club of color. I ask no corner, will give none, an ability to pay any price has never been questioned. I can and will battle any man that dares me. What is more I will pay any price, that I name. I never asked for assistance, am obligated to no one. If I am the target please get busy."

February 13, 1920

Kansas City, MO
"Baseball Magnates Hold Conference - Sporting Editor of Defender Elected Secretary - Kansas City, Missouri, February 13. - Representatives of the baseball teams of the West arrived here today and went into session at the Y.M.C.A. with the following baseball baseball magnates present: J.T. Blount, Detroit, Michigan, Detroit Stars; W.A. Kelly, Washington, DC organized baseball of the national capital; L.S. Cobb, secretary of the St. Louis Giants baseball team; John Matthews, Dayton Marcos, Dayton, Ohio; Joe Green, Chicago Giants, Chicago, Illinois; C.I. Taylor, Indianapolis A.B.C.s, Indianapolis, Indiana; Elwood C. Knox of the Indianapolis Freeman, Indianapolis, Indiana; Andrew 'Rube' Foster, American Giants, Chicago, Illinois; Charles Marshall, Indianapolis Ledger, Indianapolis, Indiana; J.L. Wilkinson, this city, and Cary B. Lewis, sporting editor of the Chicago Defender. - Temporary Officers Elected - On motion of 'Tenny' Blount, Detroit, Michigan, Mr. Foster was nominated and elected temporary President. Cary B. Lewis of the Defender was elected secretary. The aim and object of the meeting was discussed and the plan for a circuit for the season of 1921 came up for consideration. Every manager was very enthusiastic and said he would carry the same enthusiasm back to his home town. The outlook for 1921, they claim, would be the greatest history of baseball. - Foster Springs Big Surprise - One of the big surprises of the first day's meeting was when 'Rube' Foster uncovered the fact that he had a charter, incorporated, for a National Negro Baseball League. When 'Rube' displayed the charter the 'magnates' were dumbfounded. The league is incorporated in the states of Illinois, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, New York and Maryland. Then, Mr. Foster and Mr. Blount discussed tentative plans for the circuit of 1921. Dr. Howard Smith met the delegations at the depot. A smoker and dinner has been arranged. The second day's meeting will be held tomorrow. The visitors are stopping at the 'Y.'"

February 20, 1920

Kansas City, MO
"Baseball Men Write League Constitution - Western Circuit Organized; to Become Effective April 1, 1921 - Kansas City, Missouri, February 20. - A Western Circuit National Baseball League of the United States, was organized here last week in the rooms of the Community Center. Newspaper men and sports writers became the arbitrators for the baseball magnates. It was the first time in the history of a baseball meeting that there was exhibited so much harm(illegible) and good spirit. Andrew 'Rube' Foster was chosen as the temporary chairman and secretary. He stated the aim and purpose of the gathering and then said he would leave it to the newspaper men at the meeting to decide all questions, select players for the various teams and write the bylaws and constitution for the league. No sooner had he said this than C.I Taylor of the Indianapolis A.B.C.s assented, also 'Tenny' Blount of the Detroit Stars. - The Player Question - The player question was the first to come up for consideration. It is a well-known fact that some of the managers have been dickering with each others players which has caused a great deal of confusion during the past years. This was thrashed out and all agreed that the newspaper men should embody this question in the laws and constitution of the league. In the best judgement of the newspaper men all the players for the league were selected. - Writers of the Consititution - The writers of the consitituion and bylaws of the new league were Dave Wyatt, Indianapolis Ledger; Elwood C. Knox, Indianapolis Freeman; Cary B. Lewis, Chicago Defender, and Attorney Elisha Scott of Topeka, Kansas. These men were up all Friday night and part of Saturday morning, framing the 'baseball bill of rights' to guide the destiny of the future league. At noon Friday it was brought before the conference. The preamble was read and adopted. The constitution was ready by articles and sections. Correction after correction was made and finally it was approved by Attorney Elisha Scott. The consitution was signed by Andrew Foster, American Giants, Chicago; C.I. Taylor, A.B.C.s, Indianapolis, Indiana; 'Tenny' Blount, Detroit Stars, Detroit, Michigan; Chicago Giants Joe Green, Chicago; J.L. Wilkinson, Kansas City Monarchs, Kansas City, Missouri; Lorenzo Cobb, St. Louis Giants, St. Louis, Missouri. Each manager paid his $500 fee to bind them to the league and constitution. - Will Operate Next Season - The Western Circuit, National Baseball League, will not operate until next season. This meeting is the bundation for next year. The circuit will not officially operate until each city has a park, either leased or owned and this will undoubtedly be by April 1, 1921. Those who had no lease this year claimed they would have one next season. Mr. Mattews of the Dayton Marcos, who was ill with the 'flu,' sent a special delivery letter stating that he would be in perfect harmony with whatever was done at the meeting. He sent his per ratio to pay for the expense of the newspaper men who acted as arbitrators. Several road teams had representatives and paid their part of the fee to play in the circuit as per schedule. Nat C. Strong of the Nat C. Strong Amusement Company, New York City, sent a letter stating that he was ready to do anything that would promote the best interests of baseball all over the country. After the Western Circuit is put into operation successfully Mr. Foster will then call a meeting of the organization of a national Baseball League, taking in every large baseball city in the EAst. - Newspaper Men Select Players - The newspaper men had the day at the meeting. No manager had aught to say about players. They were selected on account of their RELATIVE STRENGTH to each team. The newspaper men will form an arbitration board to settle all disputes and act as publicity agents for games. The following players were selected for the teams in 1921: Detroit Stars - Pete Hill, Bruce Petway, Frank Warfield, Edgar Wesley, Joe Hewitt, Mack Eggleston, LeRoy Roberts, Henderson E. Boyd, Bill Holland, Richard Whitworth, Jimmie Lyons, Johnson Hill, Lefty Hill. - Kansas City, John Donaldson, Jose Mendez, Frank 'Bluekoi' Blattner, Jackson, Walter Muir, Rube Currie, Vicente Rodríguez, Bartolo Portuondo, Sam Crawford, Wilbur 'Bullet' Rogan, W. Harris, Bernardo Baró. - St. Louis Giants, Tullie McAdoo, Dan Kennard, Charles Brooks, Charles Scott, William Drake, Lunie Danage, Felix Wallace, Charles Blackwell, Eddie Holt, John Finner, Lee Hill. - American Giants, George Dixon, Jim Brown, Leroy Grant, Elwood 'Bingo' DeMoss, Robert Williams, Dave Malacher, John E. Reese, Thomas Johnson, Thomas Williams, Richard 'Dick' Lundy, Cristóbal Torriente, Edward 'Judy' Gans. - Chicago Giants, Lawrence Simpson, Walter Ball, Lemuel McDougal, Edward Jones, John Beckwith, William Greene, Thurman Jennings, Frank Jefferies, Horace Jenkins, Joe Green, Clarence Winston, Tom Clark. - C.I. Taylor's A.B.C.s - James 'Jim' Jeffries, 'Steel Arm' Johnny Taylor, Morten Clark, Russell Powell, Herlen Raglen, William Webster, Oscar Charleston, Ed Rile, Mitchell Murray, William 'Dizzy' Dismukes, Decatur Johnson."

February 21, 1920

Kansas City, MO
"Negro Base Ball League Assured. - The Peace Dove Soared Over Camp of the Organizers and Harmony Prevailed. - (By Dave Wyatt.) - Kansas City, Missouri - The much heralded Negro Base Ball League was launched into actual being when a three-day deliberation by the high statesites of the diamond pasttime ended one of the most successful and (illegigle) gatherings ever witnessed among our people; most especially so when the interests involved, sacrifices made, financial considerations and many other features, any one of which is enough to cast one into deep depression, is taken into account. The initial efforts, prior to the real formation of a league, was a grand success. In order not to misguide our followers, it can safely be said that the league is not as yet in existence. The parent body of the organization was put into activity at the Kansas City session, from it will spring the real league. The clubs that are members of this tentative organization and that were represented at the meeting were: Chicago Giants - Joe Green; Detroit Start - Tenny Blount; Indianapolis A.B.C.'s - C.I. Taylor; St. Louis Giants - Charlie Mills; Dayton Marcos - J. Matthews; Gilkerson's Union Giants - Attorney Scott; Kansas City Monarchs - J.L. Wilkinson; American Giants - Andrew Foster; Cuban Stars - A. Molina. These clubs are the foundation upon which the league will be built. This present association of clubs is known as the Western Circuit of Negro National Base Ball League. Affiliated with this circuit are clubs extending from Omaha, Nebrask a to and including Nat C. Strong's New York Base Ball enterprises. Fans, who are fortunate to be in the cities which form this circuit will, beyond the shadow of a doubt, witness the grandest exhibition of the national pasttime among our people that has been observed since the Negro took this form of athletic endeavor. The old rule of things as heretofore existed, ahs been waived aside. Each and every manager was forced to give up valuable players, when who, if placed upon the base ball market would bring thousands of dollars. These valuable assets were given up without the exchange of a penny and all for the good of this organization. The idea was to have all clubs composing this circuit to be just as evenly balanced in playing strength as could be. Fro the lineups comprising the various clubs it will be seen that the idea has been carried out to the complete satisfaction of all the owners and manager and no doubt exists over the manner in which this new turn of affairs will be viewed by the fan public who support the game. The biggest sensation ever experianced in the history of baseball was hurled into the opening meeting the first day. Andrew "Rube" Foster, who perhaps has more at stake than any fifty men in baseball that could be named, hurled a huge boom into the magnate's camp, when he arose and declared, "Gentlemen, the assets of the baseball club which I represent is more than all the Negro baseball clubs in existence, still if it pleases you all, I am willing to throw all these assets upon the mercy of the decision of this body of newspapermen who are present." The news writers then were unanimously chosen to settle all questions arising disputes over players, disposition of players and many other vexatious problems. The news men present were Elwood Knox, Indiana Freeman; Dave Wyatt, Indiana Ledger; Carry Lewis, Chicago Defender; A.D. Williams, Indiana Ledger."

February 28, 1920

Indianapolis, IN
"Way is Clearing For Baseball to Enjoy Its Greatest Boom - Game's Fate is UP to Magnates, Aided, of Course, by the Fans. - (By Dave Wyatt.) - That was certainly a mighty fine pre-lenten affair that the baseball magnates handed to the fans. One month ago it looked as though peace in baseball would be as hard to bring about as for the League of Nations pact to do any good. The plans of the factions were kept so well guarded that it was not until just three weeks ago that things began to come ot a head. That was when the western club owners and the Nat C. Strong enterprises held their initial confab, and later all the moguls of the middle-west held their historical love feast as the guest of Kansas City's foundation for peace before and at the banquet is shown by the fact it required only three session of peace conferences, one at Detroit, one at Chicago, and one at Kansas City, before the peace pact was signed and the storm wave was wiped out of existence It must be recognized by this time that the recalcitrant ones surrendered and that the vicory belongs to organized ball. After all, the fans will care little about who got licked and who did the licking. The thing is, baseball is once more in for an uplift. Now the time has arrived when the good old national game should get back to its feet with a rush. The baseball skies as well as the financial skies have cleared. If the people really want baseball as much as circumstances would indicate, they should soon notify the magnates after the playing season starts in 1920. Prosperity has put the dollar into circulation, and the plain fan has all share of the dollars. If he stays away from the box office in 1920 it will be because he has lost his love for the game, and not becaus ehe is unable to qualify for a ticket of admission by putting down the price. The situation is put to order for the club owner and the players. They are in for a new deal. How they cut the cards will play a big part in the future development of the game. There will doubtless be some bickering and heart burnings over certain star players. It probably will not be until the actual opening of the season that it will be known what clubs will get the cream of the playing talent. In any case, the acquiring of these stars and probable trades among the cubs should stir the interest of the fans during the remainder of the winter and put them on edge for the opening of the now league race and the fight for the international championship. The fans wanted new faces in some cities and they are going to get them, both as regards magnates and players. Will the magnates and the players, however, profit by experiences of the past? They will undoubtedly endeavor to so shape their affairs that another attempt to float another warfare will not be made for years. In the meantime, the A.B.C.'s can be expected to play the same smooth article of ball that they reeled off in 1916. A large part of Taylor's work will be to instill into the minds of his men that the team has not irreparably shot to pieces by the absence of some of the once familiar faces. The American Giants, too, will have missing links. The title holders got some great pitching last year and they are likely to get lots more of it this season, even if Dick Whitworth will not be there to electrify and even if "Beans" Williams sticks in the East. Dave Brown is just about ready to step up and take his regular turn in the box. Detroit looks good to me. Whitworth is bound to win as many games for Detroit, and he will have an able box assistant in Roberts, the eastern crack. St. Louis will be dangerous at times, though that team lacks the punch that the others have. Many of the fans pick Kansas City for first honors. If the Kaws don't win out, they should be close. The Chicago Giants ought to give fierce battle. The way they showed up during the 1919 campaign causes them to be conceded as a formidable foe for all. Dayton is expected to have a team of youngsters that will make all sit up and take notice. In all, 1920 should be a grand and glorious season."

"National Negro Baseball League is Formed - Western Managers Meeting at Kansas City a Great Success. - (By Charles D. Marshall.) - Wouldn't the late Frank Leland rejoice were he alive today and informed ofhte fact that a real, live Negro base ball league had been formed by colored base ball magnates of the West. This noted base ball man (once owner of the famous Leland Giants of Chicago) had for year labored hard to induce colored owners and managers to come together and play organized ball, but to no avail. He died with the proposition far from becoming a reality. But today the plan almost a surety for when the umpire shouts "play ball" May 1, 1920 it will be under a new heading for eight clubs of the West and that will be organized ball. That will mean much to thousands of colored fans as well as hundreds of ball players all over the country. Just what they have been arguing about for the past 15 to 20 years is at last to be a realization. It was bound to happen when such strong men as Rube Foster, C.I. Taylor, John T. Blount, Charles A. Mills, J.L. Wilkerson, John Matthews, Carey B. Lewis and Elwood C. Knox, got behind the movement and made effort to see it through. Rube Foster slipped the cog and selected the place and time to hold the meeting and out came these noble stalwarts and like magic a league was formed, officers elected, and in other words the ball started rolling by these live leaders of the great game. Of course it is nto be understood that their work is not really started but an attempt has been made and the best part of it is they have come together with an understanding. Now they are to get busy and make rules and regulation that each must abide by for the protection of all. A franchise for each club is to be made; the salary basis and limits are to be considered for the player as well as the umpires. A playing schedule is to be made and park admission prices should be made for the protection of the poor fan, with the understanding that the public is paying for professional major league palying and not outlaw or semi-professional pastime. No better selection could have been made than Andrew "Rube" Foster for president of the league for this wily old master of the great game is best suited for guiding the organization safely past all of the pit falls and loop holes that it is certain to encounter in base ball. Mr. Foster and the rest will have much to do to get everything in readiness for real organized ball playing by May 1, 1920. But it can be done very easily if every official will give it their earnest attention. A commission should be selected to prepare rules and regulations that should be enforced. But of all things, let this be one race organization of clean ruling with officials of no selfish motives or unfairness to hand out, to one another. Give the players a square deal and in turn let the player be square and fair. Make it possible that every player in the league be given a salary according to his worth and by that let us eliminate the "tramp ball tosser." Colored baseball will always have good financial support from both races, and even better when clean, professional games are played. Give us more men like C.I. Taylor, Tenny Blount, Foster and J.L. Wilkinson who urge the playing of clean ball."

Kansas City, MO
"Coming Baseball Season - Since the proposed baseball league out West, headed by Rube Foster, Tenny Blount, and others, which got under way recently, and who held a session at Kansas City, all the baseball bugs out this way have awakened from their slumber and are making preparations for the biggest season in the history of baseball. John Henry Lloyed has falled in line with the Royal Giants, while Santop, the well-known catcher of last leason is below the Mason and Dixon line digging up material to present to New Yorkers. Guy Empey sends us word that he more than likely will have a Race team this season, while Brooklyn will have several representative teams. Joe Williams has shown himself on the horizon and predicts a great season for himself.

"Baseball Writers and Managers are Royally Entertained - The baseball managers and newspaper men were royally entertained. The officers of the Community Center, where the league met, were very courteous. They wanted for nothing to make the meeting a success. On Friday night, J.L. Wilkinson, manager of the Kansas City Monarchs, entertained with a ten-course dinner at the DeLuxe cafe. Saturday night, Q.J. Gilmore, exalted ruler of the Elks, and the Elks of the city gave a banquet and smoker at the De Luxe cafe. Among the speakers were C.I. Taylor, 'Rube' Foster, Cary B. Lewis, 'Tenny' Blount, Dave Wyatt, Lorenzo Cobb, C.D. Williams, Dr. Howard Smith, Undertaker Watkins, Q.J. Gilmore, Attorney Elisha Scott, J.L. Wilkerson and others. Sunday, Mrs. Felix Payne entertained the visiting gentlemen. Mr. Payne, who is at Detroit, Michigan, with an automobile invention, telegraphed Mr. Snell to act as host for him. Mrs. Payne served a delicious dinner. Felix Payne Jr assisted in the service. Later in the evening, Dr. and Mrs. Howard Smith served dinner for 'Rube' Foster, 'Tenny' Blount, Dave Wyatt, and Elwood C. Knox. Mr. Foster remained over a few days to talk baseball matters over with the manager of this city."

March 4, 1920

Twin Falls, ID
"Cuba Claims Batter Equal to Babe Ruth - Cristóbal Torriente Said to Be Powerful Fellow with Club - He's Black - In far away Cuba there is a ball player named Cristóbal Torriente. The Cuban fans and baseball scribes think so highly of Cristóbal Torriente's slugging ability that they are now alluding to him as the "Black Babe Ruth." Torriente, like Ruth, is heavily set and possess a powerful pair of shoulders. Several National League luminaries who recently played against the "Black Babe Ruth" declared that if Cristóbal Torriente could be painted with a coat of white-wash he would be nearly as big a sensation in the major league as our own Ruth. "He's a tremendous hitter," said Jeff Pfeffer the other day. "He puts his shoulders behind every drive, and how that old ball sails when he lands on it! I found it quite a task to get the ball by him. At the bat he reminds you of Frank Schulte. He has Schulte's grace in swinging at the one." Like Ruth, Cristóbal Torriente bats and throws left-handed. In 10 games played by his team against the Pittsburgh National League club in Cuba, facing such big league pitchers as Pfeffer and Cadore of the Brooklyn Robbins and Carlson and Ponder of the Pittsburgh Pirates, the "Black Babe Ruth" pasted the pellet for the healthy batting average of .377."

March 13, 1920

Indianapolis, IN
"Shortstop Bobby Williams, One of Rube Foster's Trump Cards. - Williams Reaching for a High One - American Giant Players Soon to Report. - Time is drawing near for Chicago fans to get a peep at the boys that will represent this city this season. Many players are now ready to report - the lineup is now complete, and on April 4th all men will appear at Chicago. The ground hog has come and gone. Thousands of fans wait for the magic word, play ball. - American Giants to Open Season April 11th. - The opening date has been set at April 11th. All we wish for is for the day to be anything but zero. The new players that will don the uniforms of the Giants will be given a welcome that will go with them as long as they are connected with baseball. Chicago is known to lead in all things. There is but one Chicago. - Contract jumping Bon of Contention. - Players had got to the place where they had no respect for contracts. The owners encouraged this. Their utter folly was wrecking baseball. It was their only salvation to come to an agreement. This was done and we regret that such clubs as Hilldale and Bacharachs were not included. Both clubs have built up clubs with players taken from other clubs. Their one hobby was to wreck a club. Any club that appeared there with good men, they immediately proceeded to start dissection with the men and make them dissatisfied. They will reap their reward, in the big controversy with Foster, as he said modestly, stolen success is only temporary. They don't know baseball. Their works have shown their business qualities, we will do the rest. - Hilldale and Bacharachs Clubs Unfair. - False rumors have been appearing in some papers from the East saying that American Giants and Bacharachs would play all Western clubs. Such rumors are misleading, as we were at the meeting at Kansas City and knew these clubs will not meet. Bolden and Conners were offered an invitation to come to the meeting. After they had refused to allow the Western men to come there, to try and protect contracts between the clubs, allowing them to keep what men they had, to pay any salary they could, they turned down such an offer and was outlawed by the League."

Chicago, IL
"Giants in Readiness for Season of 1920 - By a Ball Fan - Time is drawing near for Chicago fans to get a peep at the boys who will represent this city this season, many players are now ready to report, the lineup is complete and on April 4 all men will appear at Chicago. The ground hog has come and gone, thousands of fans wait for the magic words, "play ball." - American Giants on April 11 - The opening date has been set at April 11. All fans want is for the day to be anything but zero. The new players that will don the uniforms of the Giants will be given a welcome that will go with them as long as they are connected with baseball. Chicago is known to lend in all things. There is but one Chicago. - President Rube a Busy Man - President Rube Foster is a real busy man. He is closing the details of the league in such a manner that when completed his great effort will be handed down to posterity long after he is dead. His work will stand as a tribute to athletics, the crowning efforts of a life in promoting a game that from the beginning has been a task few men would undertake. - Other Clubs Unfair - False rumors have been appearing in some papers from the East, saying that the American Giants and Bacharachs would play all western clubs. Such rumors are misleading. Bolden and Connors were offered an invitation to come to the meeting after they had refuse to allow the western men to come there, to try and protect contracts between the clubs, allowing them to keep what men they had, to pay any salary they could. They turned down such an offer, and were outlawed by the league. - Bone of Contention - Players had gotten to the place where they had no respect for contracts. The owners encouraged this. Their utter folly was wrecking baseball. It was their only salvation to come to an agreement. This was done. Such clubs as Hilldale and Bacharachs were not included. Both clubs have built up clubs with players taken from other clubs. Their one hobby was to wreck a club. Any club that appeared there with good men, they immediately proceeded to start dissension with the men and make them dissatisfied."

March 20, 1920

Indianapolis, IN
"Dave Brown - Rube Foster's Flashy South-paw who for the first time will display his goods for the inspection of the baseball bugs, as he swings around the new circuit. - Base-ball was not expected between the East and West. The organizing of the Western Circuit of the National Colored Base-ball League will prevent any clash or interference between either faction. (by Charles D. Marshall.) It seems that Eastern sport writers, (finding nothing else to do or say) have started the rumor that the Hilldales, Bacharachs and other big Eastern clubs would invade the West whenever they got ready and play any of the Western clubs without the knowledge of the officers of the Western Circuit of the National Baseball League. But any good sport should know that such a report, must certainly be poor business for that is one of the main reasons that a league has been formed. But it is also the intention of President Foster and his official assistants of the league to so readjust colored baseball, so as to give every owner, manager, player and follower a fair and square deal, preventing wars, clashes and kicking of any kind in the great pastime among our people. Hereafter a players' contract is to mean just what it says and therefore, it is bound to be respected. No one or two men are to run baseball. The idea of rule or ruin must be discarded as a clean body of men met at Kansas City, Missouri last February, and formed a league of protection against such outlawry. It is the opinion of many that as soon as this league of organized ball gets into working order it will not be long before such men as Bolden and Connors (who refused to allow the Western men to come there and protect contracts between the blucs) will hoist up the flag of truce and calmly walk into the fold of protection. - Beware Players who jump contracts. - I think it will be well for the ball player who is signed up in the Western Circuit of the National Colored Baseball league to beware in jumping a contract. For it will mean much ot him if once he is put on the black list. In fact, no player should ever be willing to leave a club or organized ball when he can be assured of getting all he is worth whether the club makes good or not. Organized ball in a large way, is a great benefit to the player. If ever the colored player expects to get a salary worth talking about it is certain to be through organized ball."

Chicago, IL
"Rube Assigns Players to Giants - Indications are that this will be the greatest baseball season in the history of the American Giants. Fans have begun talking about the available players of the American Giants. Rube Foster has been planning all the winter for the coming season. All his tryouts are ready to report and those who show any class at Schorling's park will be assigned. - Classy Players - From the following players ordered to report Foster says he will maintain the standard of play of the Giants: Jim Brown and George Dixon, catchers; Leroy Grant, Bingo DeMoss, Bobby Williams, Dave Malarcher, infielders; Judy Gans, Cristóbal Torriente, Chaney White and John Reese, outfielders; Tom Williams, Dave Brown, Tom Johnson and String Bean Williams. This club in itself can defeat any ball team in the country, but for fear some of the players may have slipped, these new men will be here for trial; Chaney White of Dallas Texas, Orville Singer of Zanesville, Ohio; Cristóbal Torriente of Havana, Cuba; Jas. Oldham of Brownsville, Tennessee; Orville Riggins of Colp, Illinois; Jack Marshall of Kansas City, Missouri; Leonard King of Fullerton, Alabama; Edward Chapman of Berwyn, Illinois; James Edwards of Compton, Ohio; R.W. Fagen and C.W. Aulston of the 25th infantry, Nogales, Arizona. From this array of talent Foster is confident of developing many stars. - Gigantic Enterprise in 1920 - From the plans outlines by Foster there will be a National League. The South will have a league. Many clubs outside the league will be affiliated. It will be handled the same as organized ball. The players developed in these subordinate clubs will be drafted, sent to the league. Those too slow for the league will be transferred to clubs of lower classifications. In this way we are assured of better baseball, better discipline and better standing. - Stars of the Game Distributed - The wisest move made by Foster was in distributing the stars to various clubs, equalizing the playing strength, and each series will be better attended. Rube Foster sent Dick Whitworth and Oscar Charleston, the two greatest stars in the profession, both idolized by the fans and great drawing cards, to Detroit and Indianapolis. Blount sent John Donaldson and José Méndez, two more great stars and drawing cards, to Kansas City. Charley Mills sent Jimmie Lyons to Detroit. Some sacrifice, yet each of these clubs will be big cards. The fans in the cities opposed losing their idols, but as the plan was explained they warmed up to it and said, 'Well, I guess this is best; so long as we see them it will do.'"

March 27, 1920

Indianapolis, IN
"Chairman Foster's View on Grave Subjects - The Big Chief On Umpires and Players Not Quite in Accord with Effectual systems in Vogue of Disciplining Unruly Players - By Dave Wyatt. - The following extract is from an interview with the Chairman of the Board of Directors of the Western Circuit of the Proposed Negro National League. - As this, the coming season, will perhaps mark an epoch in the government of Colored Baseball, the public no doubt will be greatly interested in knowing what system will prevail in the handling of all that important subject, umpire controversy. I am a firm believer in preserving the utmost good order on the ball field. I am strict disciplinarian, but far from a martinet. The only person who can preserve order on a ball field is the umpire, and in matters of discretion and judgement, where he is not specifically guided by rule, he should be supreme. I do not wish to be understood as meaning that an umpire should be a law unto himself; that his manner should be dictatorial, his attitude arrogant and his entire demeanor evince a self-satisfied air that would brook no argument or intercession. Right the contrary, I think an umpire should be pacific but firm, positive but polite, quick but unshowy, strict but reasonble. I have seen arguments on the field where I considered the umpire at fault. "A mild answer turneth away wrath." In my judgement, many a scene on the diamond could be prevented by a little - Discretion and Deliberation - on the part of the umpire, who frequently uses his authority in an arbitrary manner. One of my principal alms will be to instill into the umpires a spirit of peace and discretion. You ask me whether I believe in at once disciplining the player, immediately on receipt of umpire's statement of the facts in the case. I could answer that question with one word, but I am going to adduce some reason to show why I am opposed to the general practice employed in meeting out punichsment to players for offenses committed on the ball field. In the first place, I was a ball player myself and naturally believe in them as a class. As a rule they are reasonable, honorable, clean-living class of men, and this thought should be considered in all dealings with them. In the second place, one of the Cardinal Principles of Justice is that ever man should have an opportunity to be heard, to present his side of the case. If the player is guilty of the charges submitted by the umpire and has no reasonable defense, the end of justice and the morale of discipline can be served just as well by suspending the player some days after the violation has occurred, and all the evidence received and investigated, as by immediate suspension following the report of the umpire. Then there is another view of the question, namely, that the club owner is really the one who suffers most by a player's suspension. If we fine the player, true he may loose a small sum as a result of his infraction of the rules, and his salary goes on while he is out of the game. But his absence weakens the team and in the long run the club is the real sufferer. Therefore, if the effect of discipline can be preserved and at the same time the interest of the owner conserved, there is no reason why such cases should not be considered in the most lenient attitude possible, and by all means obtain the facts in the case from both sides before the player is punished by suspension."

Indianapolis, IN
"Will Colored Umpires Be Given a Tryout? - Will Colored Umpires Be Given a Tryout in Organized Ball. - Baseball Authorities Say They Will, But It Is To Be a Real Go - Who Knows? - (By Charles D. Marshall) - Several days ago a communication came to me from an enthusiasic fan who wanted to know "Whether Colored Umpires would be given a tryout this season over the Western circuit of the Negro National Baseball League." Of course I got busy and tried to find out from the powers that be in organized ball but as yet have been unable to get enlightened further than to say that they will be given a trial and that much came from an uncertain party. But to answer the question from my point of view I should think that, without a doubt colored umpires should be given a trial. Of course we know that some players as well as some managers and fans alike feel that the white umpire's decision carries more weight and generally comes closer to the right decision than the colored official. In most cases just because he is white. On the other hand the white umpire can be easily bluffed into deciding in favor of the losing side than can our own brother. Often the case is that a white umpire is secured who will easily decide in favor of the club who is paying him for his services. To my mind I have always felt that the white umpire looked much out of place in a game of ball played by two colored clubs. It may be that the white umpire has a better knowledge of the latest rules in baseball and that he is not easily shaken up by a broiling crowd of hot headed fans in calling a strike, but there are any number of students of the game in our race who would make good umpires. The commission of the Negro National Baseball League should make it a rule to employ nothing but colored umpires throughout the Western circuit, as we have any number of efficient men for the position. We must establish confidence in our men if we are to have organized ball. In either the major or minor leagues, they have not found room for us, no even as mascots. Why can't we manage and play the game ourselves without the aid of the other race, for certainly we know how."

Chicago, IL
"American Giants - When everybody picks on a certain ball club to win the high honors the manager of that unanimously selected aggregation generally fears for the coming season. His players really discount themselves then because of the imagined handicap they are working under. They are a bit afraid because of the fact that all eyes are on them and they have become the pick of the majority for the high honor of the season."

Chicago, IL
"Dixon on the Job - George Dixon - George Dixon, the star catcher of the American Giants, will be on the job again this season. He knows that the Giants this year will not only retain their great standard, but will come out of champions of the season with honors under their belts. George Dixon is the mainstay of the American Giants' catching staff. The bulk of the work of all the hard games is on him and he says he will be master of the situation. - Bobby Williams, Shortstop - Bobby Williams - Bobby Williams is one of the greatest shortstops in the country. He is the crack member of the world's famous American Gaints, of which Rube Foster is manager. In filling the place made by the loss of Lloyd, Williams tackled a tough job. The verdict of the fans is that Williams is here to stay and will prove a wonder this season. - Rube Foster Talks - Speaking to a Defender reporter, Rube Foster said, 'We are making every effort to round out a winning combination for this fine baseball city, and I hope to be able to announce some names soon. The team we hope to put in the field this season will be one developed along safe and sane principles. I am not going to try any new-fangled systems. Every man has his own ideas, and I have mine, but down at the bottom of it all the fans like the old base hit in the pinch and the old fast one or curve that fools the other fellow with three on. New ideas may be pressed into service now and then, but the game is about the same as when I was in the limelight as a player. The assertion that the Giants are stronger than last year will not be challenged by the well informed, but the statement relative to Foster's bunch may bear careful scrutiny. That the champions are stronger than last season may be proved, however, by the process of elimination, comparison, substitution and careful analysis. Far be it from me to overplay a good thing, to flatter, to make claim that may turn to the gray ashes of remorse, and chagrin. But win or lose, let the future go as it may, I believe that I have given Chicago a ball club that plays the sort of games folks like to see. The club may not appear to be of championship caliber; and neither has it been polished into smooth running order. But it is a club that can be looked up on to play fast ball, keep things stirred up and, even as a loser, will make the other fellows wear their very hearts to beat it down."

April 3, 1920

Chicago, IL
"Foster Wastes No Time On Uncertainties - Chicago Manager Calls to His Colors Only Players He Feels Sure Can Stand New League Pace. - (Dave Wyatt.) - Just a little breathing space, and then the new league hurley-burly will begin. Those dearly beloved Giants of ours are about as well prepared as anybody in the league - better I think, than several other clubs - and ought to put up a rattling argument from the first gong - if they will only hit that ball. The past week, uncle "Rube" was seen mailing a whole bag of vouchers for transportations; so the diamond gods should soon be rollng in from all points of the compass. As at present constituted, the Giants' team is made up of good batsmen, Yellows who should hit hard and often, but the question is how soon will they strike their gait? On all around class and machine-like polish, they should get a big lead on the other clubs in the Western circuit of the League during April and May, but if they don't hit their full stride until after that time, they are likely to be smothered. It is not the easiest thing in the world to get Rube Foster to talk about the strength of his league and the clubs therein, whether for publication or for private enlightenment, and there are times when he will not say anything about his own team, but ordinarily he will wax optimistic about his own men. "Our defense is to be just as strong as it was last year in pitching and in catching and in the infield. It will be as strong in the outfield, where we will have plenty of speed, and throwin garms the equal of last year. I am uncertain as to just who will make the regular combination out there. At any rate, you will see as much difference between the Seniór Cristóbal Torriente of today and of last year as there is between night and day. Then in batting, I believe my team this year will be a better combination for me. I have speed which can carry through plays which were flat failures last year because the men who were as asked to carry them out lacked speed. The element of speed will have a big influence on our play this year. Some of the smart teams of the circuit who thing they have our style of play down pat will be surprised. The Giants have been handicapped in the past by not having the fleet-footed men with which to make certain organized plays. Look over the fast men we have secured this season. There are Dave Malarcher, John Reese, Tom Williams, Cristóbal Torriente, Judy Gans, Bingo DeMoss, and Dave Brown, all faster than the average ball player, and most of them among the very fleet men of the game, the sort of players to bother an infield and the battery as well for fear of bunts, and swinging bunts and everything else like that. I am sincere in saying that I believe Bobby Williams will have a good year at shortstop. It's my belief that he will be there at the start of the season and that he will go great. In the unfortunate event of any of the regulars being unable to play, the team will be better fortified with second string material than in years. There are one or two positions which require some consideration as yet; but for the most part the selections have been definitely made. First base, second base, third, and center field are nothing to bother about. I would like to know that John Reese would come through for left field; for if he does his hitting will mean considerable. We should have good pitching. Dave Brown looks as though he ought to have another good year, and the same is true of Tom Johnson, Tom Williams, "Beans" Williams, and the others. We have an excellent supply of flinging material. George Dixon, our first string catcher, is in excellent form and his able assistant, Jim Brown, bids fair to develop into one of the most dependable maskmen in the circuit. Maybe in a week or so I will be able to state definitely what men are to be retained and which are to be set adrift. We have twenty-five players in the preparatory work at present; we will not carry that many but a short while after the season opens. In concluding, I want to assure the fans of Chicago and to tell those of all the circuit also that I am going to do my level best to have a winning team this season. I am not saying how or what we are going to do, but I am saying that we have a much better combination that we had last season, and that we will positively not be with the rans in the race. No matter what betides us, you will find us working all the time."

Chicago, IL
"Success of the League is Up to the Fans - Will the Many Hardships Endured by the Promoters Be Acknowledged? - At the Turnstile? - By Dave Wyatt - If as recent as two seasons ago a fan ventured to say that Bill Francis, Dick Whitworth, Pete Hill and Oscar Charleston would pass to other clubs without a vast protest on the part of owners and fans, he would have been recommended to the madhouse. Yet in this brief period the American Giants greatest pitcher, one of their most wonderful infielders, and their most sensational outfielder have passed on to other fields of endeavor. Salvos of indignation may be fired at your uncle "Rube," but no doubt he justified his stand. Rube Foster has made more sacrifices for the good of the game than all the managers together, who at present constitute the personnel of owners and all those who may come. During the eleven or more years that he has headed a club the Chicago manager has been the chief benefactor to a few hundred players and promoters who have basked in the sunshine of baseball popularity at various times. He has been with players and owners alike, as well as the fans. - Congenial and Considerate - Rube Foster broke up one of the greatest playing machines of all time that baseball be put upon a firm bases in Detroit, and sighting the necessity of organization, he decided to advance a few strides farther in the game of sacrifice. When the idea of a foundation for a Colored baseball League was conceived its sponsors at once hearkened to the popular demand for a circuit as evenly balanced in playing strength as was possible. It was seen that success could only be attained by the distribution of players so that each club in the circuit could at least acquire one, two, or three players of such established prestige that it would at once arouse the interest of the public through the various cities to a point where there could be no possible doubt of a complete evolution of antiquated ideas into a full realization of modern methods of baseball government. - Vicissitudes and Operation - Foster has been the rock against which many a wave of adversity has been dashed to nothingness. He has weathered the storm of fierce criticism; he has sailed smoothly over the many obstacles that the combined power of his adversaries had placed in his path. For the season of 1920 he is facing the greatest triumph, a realization of a life's dream. But his hopes are not fully realized. True, all of his former foes are gleefully parading under his baseball banner. But what of the fans - will they harken unto the call of organization, as well as the high cost of existence, will they keep the mechanism of the turnstiles lubricating and shining? The American Giants' park is operated upon a basis that makes it entirely different from any similar field in the country. The cost of operation will equal, if not surpass, many of the high class minor league plants. Reduction in baseball has reached such an advanced stage that many of the other leagues are cutting off the bleacher accommodations altogether, while those who retain a few seats in the sun sections are negotiating the increase in admission of former seasons. Baseball paraphernalia, salaries and incidentals necessary to operation have about doubled in cost in the past few seasons. Travel and food, as well as sleeping accommodations, are extremely menacing to an owner's pocketbook. Therefore, it would appear that in those cities where conditions warrant it, and where as we learn that extensive and elaborate plans for the accommodation of the fans are in the making, if the new venture in baseball is to be a success, increase in the price of admission must be met by the public; for with the clubs playing to crowded stands on one day of the week and to practically empty seats the other days, the overhead expense of the league operation cannot be met with any amount of satisfaction to the owners. No doubt whatever exists over the fans' desire for good, fast, clean baseball, and if they are to cooperate with the men who are making such things possible, they will soon be in a position to allow the fact to be known by qualifying for such admission as the promoters deem just and fair and their acquiescense in that respect will go a long way in the forging of a strong link in the chain of cities that are to form the Negro National Baseball League."

Chicago, IL
"Giants Mobilizing - That American Giants will be the club that National League clubs will have to beat this season to win championships, is the opinion of all the wise heads of the different clubs. The club Foster will present to all the fans shows all the class of all former clubs, for the first time this year, the players sure to be retained and who are here published, are George Dixon and Jim Brown, catchers, best in the business; Leroy Grant, 1st; Bingo DeMoss, 2nd; Bobbie Williams, shortstop; Dave Malarcher, 3rd, the greatest infield in history of Giants. The outer gardeners are John Reese, Cristóbal Torriente, Judy Gans and Chaney White. The pitchers are Tom Williams, Tom Johnson and Dave Brown. Of the newcomers, Orville Riggins, a speed marvel, Jack Marshall, James Edwards, Orville Singer, these players have the class to make any club and will be kept on the Giants payroll, even without these players the Giants could beat any ball club, yet the preparedness of the future warrants such promising players to be retained. With the departure of several of the Giant headlinesrs, Rube said he had no fear of the future of the Giants, that their superior inside play will tide them into the championship, that the going will be hard, yet ultimate success is sure. It will be a great season, and when the fans see the club they will marvel at the fastest club that has represented Chicago. The fans are invited Sunday to take a peep at the many strange stars that will represent them. They will practice from 1 to 3 Sunday. Also orders for season boxes will be taken. Those wishing last year's reservations will have to renew the reservation."

Chicago, IL
"Whitworth Goes - Richard Whitworth, pitching ace of the American Giants, said good-bye to his many Chicago friends last Sunday, when he left for Detroit, Michigan, where he will play the coming season as a member of the Detroit Stars. There is no denying the fact that Whitworth is today one of the greatest pitchers in the game, he has met and defeated all the crack clubs of both races, beating such twirlers as Cyclone Joe Williams, Cannon Ball Dick Redding, Juan Padrón, Phil Cockrell, Tom Williams and others of that high type. When Rube Foster handed the great player his transportation it was plainly evident that the latter realized what a loss to his team was taking place, but in his usual good natured way said: "I hope that you have even better success in Detroit than you have had with me." Whit, as we call him, was idolized by the fans and it is certainly that when the Stars play here this summer he will be given a royal welcome by his legion of friends."

April 10, 1920

Chicago, IL
"Giants Pitching to Be Big Factor - Rube Foster Believes it Strong Enough to Win. - (By Dave Wyatt.) - Unless I am very much mistaken the American Giants four first -string pitchers this year will be Tom Williams, Lieutenant Tom Johnson, Dave Lefty Brown, and Jack Marshall. The latter is a Kansas City product, and early spring lampings on the lad undoubtedly gives him a place with the first four. Nothing definite as yet can be said of "Blaus" Williams, and should he luckily show up, he has a bright chance of being headed Detroitward or in some other direction where high class services are needed. Not that "Blaus" is not alright, but it looks as if the Giants have annexed the class of the pitching field and "Blaus" with the present staff would look like a corner on the pitching market. Yes, Marshall is a most promising looking heaver, right hander, a world of speed, and he brings up his offering with a kick that is bound to play havoc with many an aspiring batter's average. Buck Ewing, a high school lad from Massilon, Ohio, has displayed some real class behind the bat, and he looks good to be detained for complete and expert inspection. Several of the newcomers look good and may land a berth with some of the clubs. It is certain that many hopes trying out here cannot be retained, therefore it is barely possible that by chance some team may pick up a diamond in the rough. One thing is certain, there is a fellow named Wiggins, a coal miner from down state, there is not a chance of anyone landing him. If the lad can bat anything like up to his class of fielding there he will be a grey old man when Rube Foster turns him loose. He is a shortstop and we vouce for the statement, he looks like a fixture. At any rate the Giants are going to size up awful strong. Buck Ewing, Riggins and Jack Marshall, with Jim Brown to jump in and help out the established regulars of George Dixon, Leroy Grant, Bingo DeMoss, Bobby Williams, Dave Malarcher, Judy Gans, Cristóbal Torriente, and John Reese, with a hurling string of Tom Williams, Tom Johnson and Dave Brown, we opine that the going is bound to be mighty rough for the other fellows. True we haven't heard from Uncle C. I. Taylor and Tenny Blount hasn't sent us any world fair reports. Mills says absolutely nothing and K.C. does not connect. Dayton is beginning to perk up and Rube Foster's new talent interests Joe Green. It looks like a case of hurry brother magnets or the windy city crew have landed another one best bet team. Sunday, April 11, the Giants open the season with Rogers Park, a Chicago League team, so we can get a real line on Foster's gang. But no matter what transpires within the next few days we have given you the lineup that you can just about look to wear the Chicago colors for the season of 1920."

Chicago, IL
"Nothing Lacking to Make Giants Great; "Rube" Has Fine Team by All the Dope - Problem that Confronts Him Just Now is How He Shall Select from Wealth of Playing Material - By Dave Wyatt - "Rube" Foster is engaged here in whipping into shape a batch of material for the strongest ball team that ever represented Chicago. That statement goes without qualification. It is as conservative as possible, or the least that we can say. It is foreign to our nature to wax enthusiastic about ball teams in early April, as weather conditions will not permit of a fair estimate of the goods packed by the athletes. But in this case the players and their records speak for themselves. Not only is the team which Foster is fashioning the best that ever wore Windy City war paint, but the big chief has supplied the material for what at this time appears to be one of the swiftest fielding combinations ever seen on any team amongst out clan. On paper and in practice it would seem to compare favorably in hitting power to former teams of established presige, and most of the players are young, as compared with past aggregations of strong-arm gents. The main body of the team has been in action here for a week, and the players are just now beginning to show their first traces of real form. - A Bunch of Hitters - Not only in size, but also in personnel, the roster reads not unlike a big league roll call. Foster has twenty men in the preparatory work. With Leroy Grant at first base, Bingo DeMoss at second, Dave Malarcher at third and Bobby Williams or Bill Riggins at shortstop, which seems to be the final arrangement, the club will present the unique spectacle of an infield composed entirely of men who should, in the language of the diamond, be top hitters in this new circuit, while Cristóbal Torriente and Judy Gans in the outfield are certain to camp around the select circles of the swatsmiths, John Reesethe new outfielder, comes here from the Hilldales of Philly. He has been facing all the high class twirling of the Eastern hurlers, and if there are anything to signs, then he supplies that punch which the fans so feared might be missing. Then there is a possibility of one of the catchers developing into a slashing hitter. Anyway, it seems certain that the club will have at least six men hitting up around the coveted goal, and they will be in there battling every day. With that kind of hitting a team ought to win, if given just fair pitching, and from the class of men composing the slab staff it would appear that the heaving is to be of a very high order. Not only are all of last year's holdovers coming back stronger than ever, but the new men are showing to advantage, and this includes the youngsters. Tom Williams, the former Eastern crack, is a late arrival and a few days' work has convinced him that he will be able to stage that same brand of pitching that so annexed the favor of the Chicago fans some three seasons ago. All know what Tom Johnson figures to do in the circuit. Lefty Dave Brown has made a showing that makes him a formidable candidate for the honor of a regular, while Jack Marshall, a wirey, strapping fellow, with a bafling delivery, will make a vigorous bid, and no doubt will be retained. - That Infield - The infield problem has been solved. Davy Malarcher, this season's guardian of the hot horner - third base - needs no introduction: his work is destined to yield a great surprise to the fans, for no doubt whatever exists Dave Malarcher is one of the grandest ball players that ever wore a spiked shoe: in fact, Malarcher is so efficient at all positions that even a wise old own like 'Rube' fears he may no place him properly. Bobby Williams is showing speed and class and should be well groomed at short, as he and Davy paired on the infield some years ago; however, in case Bobby's oversea injury slows him up, then Bill Riggins, a new man from Southern Illinois, will no doubt lend first aid. This lad is a coal miner, and from the form he is now flashing it is going to be a mighty tough job to keep him out of the regular position. If this lad can hit the pill up to the standard that he grabs and flings the sphere, then it is da, da to the other clubs on the circuit. Many of the other new boys reveal streaks of coming class and may be retained by other clubs of the circuit. Buck Ewing, a husky high school boy from Ohio, bids fair to break into the ranks of Foster's catchers, for with Jim Brown's prowess as a batsman, his ambition and all-around playing ability, with 'Chunk' George Dixon catching, Jim Brown will soon convince the chief that such a man as he belongs somewhere in there every day, and with the retention of young Buck Ewing, Jim Brown will eventually break in there every day. Unless I am badly mistaken, the Giants' line-up this year will read: Leroy Grant, Bingo DeMoss, Bobby Williams, Bill Riggins, Dave Malarcher, infielders; John Reese, Cristóbal Torriente, Judy Gans, outfield; George Dixon, Jim Brown, Buck Ewing, catchers; Tom Williams, Tom Johnson, Dave Brown, Jack Marshall, pitchers."

April 11, 1920

Chicago, IL
"Giants Get off Bad, Leaguers Down Them in Opener - By Dave Wyatt - Tom Williams' wildness, John Reese and Bobby Williams' misjudgement of batted balls, coupled with the inability of Rube Foster's gang to bing the ball, proved the undoing of the Chicago representative of the Western Circuit of the Negro National League. Tommy Williams had a little too much stuff on his heaving and the ball went wild often enough to get the star into a hole from which he never recovered until his gang was beaten. The fielding of the Giants was up to the standard and only for the heavy gale that swept the grounds, John Reese and Bobby Williams, no doubt, would have handled the chances which were offered them successfully, as it was, along about the fifth after a couple of bobbles etc., had filled up the stations, a leaguer worked Tom for a base, forcing in a run and then some husky chap near cleared the stations with a drive, the Colored boys failed to hit after the first round, and they also failed to score. Jack Marshall, the Kansas City recruit, unfurled rare form and had the leaguers doing some mighty funny stunts trying to hit his fast shoots and snake-like curves. Jack Marshall looks and impresses in a manner that abodes no good for the batters who face him this season. Wriggin, a new infielder, displayed streaks of cunning greatness and got in good with the fans. Rube Foster has a world of good playing material. They all field and throw well, just how good they can hit as yet to be found out and what they will do on the bases is another question. Anyhow, the big manager has two more yet to come and they are reported as finds; so there is no fear of the Giants not being able to live up to past good deeds. Next Sunday, April 18, they tackle one of Chicago's best clubs, the Magnets, and we should learn a whole lot about the Giants in that game, as well as the series they are now playing out. The old heads, such as Leroy Grant, Bingo DeMoss, George Dixon, and Judy Gans are going to just about as of old. Now if the new men come through, we may have some real live news of the Rube Foster gang soon.

Chicago, IL
"Giants Lift Lid Sunday - Baseball played upon the diamond by men in uniform is almost upon us here in Chicago. The warm sun is out and the fans are beginning to lay their bets and inquire as to starting time of the games. The owners of the American Giants are wel satisfied with their efforts thus far towards giving the fans a winner, and while not making any early predictions, have very strong convictions about how strong the Giants will contend, and know that they will be among the leaders. What sort of a team have we really got? What pitcher for the grand occasion of April 11? How will the remodeled infield stack up? Such are the queries, and such are the questions that will keep discussion going vigorously till the start of the opening battle."

April 11, 1920

Chicago, IL
"Foster's Crew Are Trounced - Leaguers Pull Up from Behind and Put the Local Champs to Rout - By Dave Wyatt - These local champs of ours ran into a mighty tough snag Sunday, when they essayd to bump-off the Rogers Parks of the Chicago League. Long accustomed to winning conquests in inaugural events, the dark crew threatened to live up to past prestige, and jumped right out in the first fram and shoved two markers across the counter; they signified an intense liking for the pitch offering of the pudgy pale-faced heaver of the other side, and incidentally threw a whole bunch of cheer into the large audience by touching up the old apple to the tune of three bingos right off the real. With two runs across the pan, and Tom Williams going big guns, the huge throng of fans settled back into their chilly surroundings bent on witnessing a baseball killing, with the locals as the chief offenders. Williams' pitch wing was functioning in grand style, and continued to do so for three innings. However, somewhere in that particular frame the old souper developed engine trouble and our Tom stood voucher for two free passages to the first station. Tom should have been yanked right there, not so much over his charity, but these chilly days will not safely permit of more than a three inning go for any hurler, unless he has had a chance for a fair amount of workouts, and our dark hopes have not had that opportunity for work that would assure them going the full or even half the nine inning distance. The leaguers relayed three pitchers through the nine innings, starting with the most unlikely, who, after the first spell, held our gang hitless for two rounds; then Black, a classy southpaw, pushed the other three, and our hopes could only see him for one hit, no runs. Mack, one of the niftiest twirlers around these parts, stepped the last three for the whites, and our boys failed to put the willow to his stuff; John Reese stepped into one for a bingo, and that was all. After having the doing, apparently, all stacked away, oneo r two of the southsiders got mixed up with the wind, upset the pedestal of hope and spilled the goodies. It was this way: Tom Williams was still shooting as late as the fifth, when Winkler stepped up and pushed a high one into the shortstop (illegible), which Bobby Williams misjudged and muffed; the next man singled sharply to center field, while the batter following him pushed a little roller past pitcher Tom and acquired first base. With the hassocks crowded, the dark heaver lost the way to the plate, thereby forcing in a run. With the bases still ganged, Madigan slammed out a fierce looking drive in the direction of left field. John Reese tore in, misjudged the flight of the sphere, and it fell safe, while a couple of runners took advantage of the mishap and crossed the pan. A moment later the outfielder bobbled on another and the leaguers annexed the fourth run. Jack Marshall, the cyclonic heaver of Kansas City, mounted the hill in the sixth and at once put the league crowd into a flurry. They just couldn't solve his delivery. Jack Marshall's long suit is speed, a sharp breaking drop and a side-arm crossfire that makes the flesh of the batter crawl, that is coming as it does right behind one of those ligtning-like darts, close in. All the regulars displayed the class of former seasons, and while Rube Foster worked a patched up outfield Sunday, that is only a temporary circumstance, as Cristóbal Torriente will get in soon and another outfielder from the Texas sod is also on the way. A boy, touted as a world beater, is also due to arrive soon. This lad is a Zanesville product, and can go the hundred yards in ten seconds flat; so if the new men live up to the expectations of the big boss, then we expect to see the local gang show their heels to a lot of ball clubs ere the season progresses. Bill Riggins, the recuit infielder, was given an opportunity to display his goods, and the fans voiced their approval of his form and ability. Young Buck Ewing, the kid catcher, will have his chance soon; right now he must watch the old heads and get wise to the batters, then we think that he is in for a lot of work, as he looks and appeals to us like one who will make good. The Magnates of the Chicago league will tackle the Giants Sunday, the 18th and if they gather the best players from the other clubs in the league, as the Rogers Parks did, then the fans are undoubtedly in for a real ball game."

April 17, 1920

Chicago, IL
"Joe Green's Giants are working out daily with the American Giants, and the old heads are cutting some mighty pert capers. Joe has had an unusual string of good fortune in the fact that he did not have to worry over new material. Many of the players that Rube Foster is priming no doubt will revert to Green, and, as quite a few of them flash streaks of baseball class, Joe will be the beneficiary thereby. The Chicago Giants open at Indianapolis May 2, and they are carrying a team that is destined to give C.I. Taylor's gand a tussle for honors."

April 18, 1920

Chicago, IL
"Magnets Play American Giants at Schorling Park Sunday - What is perhaps the best club coming out of the Chicago League will be the attraction at 39th street and Wentworth Avenue Sunday. This club is the one and only one that could be depended upon to bring into camp such strong teams as the Beloits, Joliets, Gunthers and other teams, who in the past have made life miserable for Rube Foster's crew. Nate Kaplan, oener of the Magnates, is president of the Semi-Pro League, therefore it is reasonable to assume that with the wealth of big league material working out around these parts, the Magnates are bound to present a front that no doubt will extend the men that 'Rube' has gathered to the full extent of their ability, and it is more than likely that the south side pets are in for a first class trimming. Nate Kaplan has succeeded in shaking loose from the big leagues some of the high class players who is the past performed around here, and of whom we had mourned over the loss to this kind of company. These fellows would go out in any kind of weather and under the most trying conditions if it means the undoing of the Giants. Rube Foster has sent a hurry call to Cristóbal Torriente, the Cuban outfielder, and he will be in on time to enter the Sunday contest. White, another whirlwind infielder of this season's Giants, will also be on hand, and a ten second man whome 'Rube' has signed will no doubt give the fans a sample of his speed. Singer is the new man's name, and he comes highly touted by those who know. Big Taylor, a pitcher who has done wonders on Eastern clubs, will show the fans a few things in the pitching line, so if the clatter that is coming from the camps of the two teams that play Sunday is significant, then the fans of Schorling park are in for a very rare treat. The games are called about 3:15 p.m. and with standing room at a premium in last Sunday's chilly breezes, we would advise those who like comfortable views of a contest to get out early or make reservations no later than today, for indications point to some crowd, and it will be some game. Phone Yards 6820."

Chicago, IL
"American Giants Park, 89th Street & Wentworth Avenue - Sunday, April 18, American Giants vs. Magnets of Chicago League - Games Called at 3:00 p.m."

April 23, 1920

Philadelphia, PA
"Philly Fans Look - Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, April 23. - The Madison Athletic Park at 34th and Reed streets staged a big opening when they played the McCullough's Giants of this city. 'Rube' Foster, chairman of the western circuit of the National League, came all the way from Chicago to be a participant in the opening ceremony. He incidentally gave the lid tilting a big boost by hurling the first ball of the season over the plate. A big smoker was given at Scott's hotel in honor of the big Western promoter and he assured the fans that he would, in the near future, bring his famous team here for a series against the locals. Dan McClellan, the veteran player and manager, has succeeded in roundin gup a collection of players that look good to hold theirs inmost any kind of company. Otto Briggs, who has performed on any number of the big teams of the country, will act as captain, and that assures us of a class of playing that will measure up to any form that is being displayed by any big club in the country. The Madison Athletic park and field will be one of the most spacious and pretentious arenas for athletic endeavor ever sponsored by a Race enterprise, and nothing but the very best attractions will show there. It is barely possible that a great many of the big Western teams will play here, as the Western clubs are now busy on plans pointing to that end, and as there appears to be a wealth of playing material that will not be used up by the Westerners, we look to see some classy material being headed this way. In that case the Madisons can be depended upon to show a team that is bound to make the fans of Philly feel proud."

April 24, 1920

Chicago, IL
"Dave Malarcher, the spectacular third baseman of the Chicago champs, ran afoul of a pair of mighty sharp spikes, sustaining a very severe wound in his hand. He is out of the lineup at present and is undergoing treatment at Provident hospital. Bill Riggins, a flashy youngster, will cavort around the third station during Dave's absence."

Chicago, IL
"Singer, the young college lad that is trying out for an infield job, with the American Giants, has shown himself to be a mighty nifty fielder, also a pretty wise chap on general baseball maneuvers. The lad's throwing arm loses much of its caste when pitted against the men that have been assembled here, especially on the infield, as 'Rube' has the greatest bunch of flingers on the inner works to be found outside the big show."

April 25, 1920

Chicago, IL
"American Giants Park, 89th Street & Wentworth Avenue - Sunday, April 25, American Giants vs. Dodger Training Athletic Club of Intercity Association - Games Called at 3:00 p.m."

Chicago, IL
"Dodger-Trainers Will Tackle American Giants - Big Taylor Will Display His Wares Against the Chicago Leaguers - If we get the weather the fans of Schorling Park will have an opportunity to view what, according to advance reports, will be a real ball game; incidentally they will get first peek at big Taylor, the pitcher that Rube Foster has been fashioning for the edification of just such teams as the Chicago leaguers, and a few of his own clan as well. The Dodgers are in tip top, mid-season form, as many of the players have been doing basketball all winter, while others have been keeping in form by means of indoor baseball. It is barely possible that the league fellows will spring a mighty big surprise on our uncle 'Rube,' for the leaguers all know that by putting a up a good show they cinch a return engagement, and with thousands of fans on the south side clamoring for a squint at the athletes that our local manager has gathered, the team that can put up an even fight or forge to the front on the stamping grounds of the dark champs has a chance to acquire more kale in a three game series out here than they would annex in a half season on the Chicago League circuit. Rumor has it that a tip has gone out that Lefty Sullivan will perhaps be turned over to some of the local leagues for further seasoning, and a hot fight is on in the ranks of the league crowd for first call on that worthy pitcher's services; Dyer, a recent acquisition from the ranks of the Detroit American league, has been sparring for an opening on some of the local clubs, and with the old and familiar system in vogue, and successfully operated - that is packing or assembling all the best from all clubs, when they tackle the Giants - we expect the league crowd to give our champs an awful rub for the honors Sunday. Taylor, the big pitcher, created quite a stir down East, where he was a member of the same club from which Tom Williams was secured; he is an overseas hero, is of fine physique, has a world of smoke on his offerings and knows the game. Bill Riggins, the sensational youngster that Foster uncovered, will have a chance to show the fans that he is just as efficient at third base as at short, for in the expected absence of Dave Malarcher throuh injury, the recruit will guard third base territory. These games will give the fans a chance to judge for themselves as to how the local champs will shape up for the new circuit which will be ushered into being on May 2; there will be no necessity for experimenting then, so the fans in these games that are being played will have the best chance to view all the material that will represent them in the new league."

Chicago, IL
"Leaguers Rout the Giants - Big Taylor, the pitcher recruit who was put on triel for his baseball life with the American Giants, was forced to consume an awful bunch of punishment right in the very first round on his local debut last Sunday. About the only alibi that could be offered for the slaughter of the new hurler would be little Williams' failure to hold a pop fly on a hard chance, and that would have retired but one. After all five batters touched the sphere for a total of eight hits, with a base on balls, which netted them five runs, however, Williams did get his staff to working when he allowed two ball to get by him, the same two men subsequently scoring. Bill Riggins was not at home on the hot corner, and Dave Brown seemed out of place in right field. The old standbys, George Dixon, Judy Gans and Bingo DeMoss, by the aid of Leroy Grant, Tom Williams and Taylor, pulled some mighty fast plays. The boys hit well, but not at opportune times. When the Giants have had an opportunity for regular work, with Cristóbal Torriente here, and others, also when the newcomers become free from being crowd shy, no serious doubt exists over the class that they are expected to reveal. As it is, raw recruits, some of whom never saw a big league game before coming here, then being called to fill the shoes of some of our greatest players, and to do it before hostile and biased fans, we say it is a task. More than twenty years of experience in the game here has taught us to know that Chicago is the toughest town in the world to break in at. Rube found that to be true in 1902; he left and returned a star. Bruce Petway did likewise. That should be some consolation to the youngster who is now having a hard row to hoe."

New York, NY
"Foster Visits Gotham - Andrew Rube Foster, the Western John McGraw of baseball, blew into the city last Sunday from Philadelphia, where he was royally entertained by many old friends. Rube's business in Philly was to look over the new Madison Athletic baseball park at 34th and Reed Streets. From all reports the new field is a knockout. While in Gotham, Rube was in conference with James A. Kelly of the Capital City Giants, Washington, D.C.; Connie Savage and Jeff Tesreau, representing Dyckman Oval; John Connors, Nat Strong and others. While not authoritively stated, it is though that many of the Western teams under Rube's control will be sent to New York off dates after June to play at Dyckman Oval on Sunday and Saturdays. When the wizard was approached on the subject he was mum. If such should be the case, Eastern baseball will have an opportunity of seeing the American Giants, A.B.C.s, Kansas City Monarchs, Detroit Stars and other famous teams in action."

May 1, 1920

Chicago, IL
"Held Up - Cristóbal Torriente, star center fielder of the American Giants, has been held up in Tampa, Florida, by immigration officers pending a hearing from Chicago. Rube Foster communicated with authorities at Tampa, through the immigration office in Chicago, and received word that Cristóbal Torriente would be released in time to take part in the opening of the Western Circuit League, May 2."

May 2, 1920

Chicago, IL
"Schorling Park, Chicago, Illinois, Sunday, May 2 - Romeos of Chicago League vs. American Giants"

Chicago, IL
"Teams Are Well Framed - Many Players Signed by Clubs will be Strangers to Fans on Western Circuit - By Dave Wyatt - Sunday, May 2, is the opening date of the new circuit, and if the organization gets off to a good start, under fair skies, with good crowds in evidence, and if there is anything in beginning right the season should be all the most optimistic have predicted, so far as material success goes. As to the other end of it - how the teams will run on the diamond - the seventh sons of the seventh sons have been on the job all spring doping out the winner, and it is generally conceded that Chicago, Detroit, Indianapolis, Kansas City, St. Louis, Dayton, the Cubans and chicago Giants will win the gonfalon - it all depends where the home of the prophet is that you touch for the inside dope. Each of the clubs in the new circuit has some particular department in which it looks strong and yet no club stands out with a head and shoulders advantage over the other clubs that would threaten a runaway race. Kansas city is the only club in which the dopester cannot put his hand right on one department and point out exceptional strength. But Kansas City is working under a strange manager, whose methods are not generally known, and he has assembled a few players from the far West whose work is not familiar on the circuit, also a few Cubans, so it is hardly logical to attempt any judgement on the Kansas City club at this time. - Some Strong Features - Foster is strong on pitchers and infielders, and his outfield looks good. Detroit is strong in its infield combination. The Cubans are strong on pitchers and on hitting strength, but if they lose and Portuondo the Islanders have no longer what looked like the best club in the circuit. St. Louis should work into one of the best hitting clubs in the circuit, and the pitching staff looks strong. The A.B.C.s are out in front in its superiority in outfield material and the infield will rank close behind the American Giants. Through the conditions that prevailed at the time of the formation of the circuit nobody outside of Chicago is willing to give the Giants a tumble, but a little thing like that never worries the big chief. That bird was wise in his day and generation and never does any kicking before or during the season. If the team fails to cop he has no alibis to concoct, and if the boys romp home he can sit back with a wise look. Rube Foster has a whole raft of Roks in his camp and he retains quite a number of aspiring youngsters for further inspection. Bobby Williams, Bill Riggins, and Singer are battling for a place in the infield; two of them are sprinters and the latter has a 10 second record in the 100 yards. Williams has been with the team for a couple of seasons and the other two are grand prospects, but it appears that Captain Bingo DeMoss will have to select from the trio, about two, for young Ewing, the catcher, is looming up mighty strong, both as a receiver and hitter; he is also a grand thrower and ambitious. If Jim Brown flashes enough form to warrant his being placed in the outfield or on the infield, with the most likely looking youngster's retention, the Giants will be amply safeguarded against the injury to regulars and at the same time will be able to put a real team on the field at all stages. While the season is extremely young, some idea can be obtained of the number of finds. Detroiters are raving over Boyd, Hill and Mack Eggleston, youngsters who seem to be able to do everything. Chicago bugs opine that Jack Marshall is one of the best righthanders who ever made his temporary home at Schorling Park - and there have been a great group of North-Paws there. Indianapolis enthusiasts declare that Tick Houston is the best second baseman they have ever seen since the days of Bingo DeMoss. St. Louis fans cannot help but feel proud of their kid left-hander, Luther. Considering everything, the crop of 1920 youngsters is one of the best we have had in a long time."

Chicago, IL
"American Giants Pull a Win - Fast Playing and Healthy Walloping Brings Victory to the South Side Crew - By Clarence Freeman - Rube Foster's return from the East had an invigorating effect upon the rapidly passing confidence of the baseball athletes that he had gathered to represent this city in the new baseball circuit. Last Sunday the gang romped off with their first victory of the present season, and they did it in such a businesslike way that their admirers are once more rallying under their banner and procleaiming them to be all that advance notcies have pictured them to be. Rube had his boys pulling their stuff that has in seasons gone by snatched many a victory from certain defeat. In the first inning, after John Reese had gone out on an easy chance, short to first, Dave Malarcher came up and tapped the pillet down the third base line, beating the throw to first base; Bingo DeMoss released a blow good for two stations, while George Dixon followed with a rap that released the bags of their burdens, resulting in two runs. George Dixon slugged one that ascended too high for the first baseman to handle, and thus the South Siders laid the blows next to a (illegible) again. Rube offered the (illegible) squeeze and it worked successfully. Leroy Grant rolled one down to third, on which the guardian of that station erred. Bobby Williams squeezed one base on his push to the pitcher, the (illegible) ending with the Giants five runs to the good. The Romeos could do absolutely nothing with the cyclonic delivery of Jack Marshall, registering but two blows off his offering. At the end of the third Tom Johnson took up the pitching burden, and after (illegible) innings of the lieutenant's (illegible) hurling the opposition tallied (illegible) safely. At this juncture Tom Williams went in, Tom had too much stuff and encountered difficulty with his control At any rate, the Romeos (illegible) to score two men who had undoubtedly acquired first on (illegible) in the (illegible) first on balls (illegible) is the (illegible) so the two (illegible) visitors (illegible).

May 8, 1920

Chicago, IL
"Jim Brown - Catcher, American Giants. - The receiving of the great brother battery, Dave and Jim, is not only one of the most efficient ball receivers, but he has displaced enough all round ability to stamp him as the real find of the 1919 season. Jim Brown's efforts in utility roles is bound to create a decided impression upon some of the regulars, for with his ability to clot, throw, run, field and the readiness with which he absorbs the fine points of the game, it is certain that the big chief will soon sight the necessity of having such a man in the line daily; for with George Dixon, the premier of the league, on deck, Jim Brown is too valuable to the team to warm the bench, and we predict that he will not."

Chicago, IL
"Eastern Sport World - By White - Rube (illegible) the East - Little did baseball fans think when Uncle Rube Foster blew into town Monday, two weeks ago, he primarily came on a peace mission to straighten out the past in some complicated baseball matters that had been hanging fire for years between the Western wizard and John Connors of the Bacharach Giants. But such is the case, with the result that Connors came across and is now in sympathy with the activities of the West. At 3 p.m. Wednesday evening of last week Rube handed Connors a receipt for $500, which identifies him with the new league out West. Connie Savage, of Tesreau's Bears, was the prime mover at the peace conference, which lasted nearly 24 hours. This state of affairs will bring all of the Western teams identified with the Negro National League East this year after July 1, the majority of which will be seen in action at Dyckman Oval - the home of the Bears. Among them are the American Giants, Taylor's A.B.C.s, Kansas City Monarchs, St. Louis Giants, Chicago Giants, Dayton Marcos, Detroit Stars and Chicago Giants."

May 9, 1920

Chicago, IL
"Sunday, May 9 - Chicago Giants of Western Circuit N.N.L. vs. American Giants - Games Called at 3:00 P.M."

Chicago, IL
"Foster's Crew Puts Kibosh on Chicago Giants - Visiting Pitcher's Control Goes Bad and Rube's Gang Piles up Big Lead - By Captain James H. Smith - The American Giants and the Chicago Giants of Chicago hooked up in their annual scrap last Sunday at Schorling Park and, as always, interest was at fever heat. The largest crowd of the season turned out and the bantering was continuous throughout the contest. Joe Green has a pretty good team together this year and with a little more team work should make good around the circuit. Walter Ball, the old reliable, was wild as a March hare and put his team at a great disadvantage right at the start and they never recovered, especially while Dave Brown was on the rubber, they simply could not see his offerings. When Tom Williams ascended the mound they seemed to take a liking to his curves and started to pound them around the lot, but were too far behind to catch up. Dave Malarcher and Bingo DeMoss were the stars with the willow, each securing three hits. Cristóbal Torriente, who, by the way, had just arrived in town Saturday, crashed a loud double to right center in the third inning. This was the hardest hit ball in the game. Next Sunday the Dayton Marcos will oppose the American Giants and the fur will fly, as the Giants are still smarting from that 4 to 0 defeat handed them by this team last year and are out for sweet revenge."

May 16, 1920

Chicago, IL
"Sunday, May 16 - Dayton Marcos N.N.L. vs. American Giants at Chicago, Illinois."

Chicago, IL
"Semi-Pro Baseball Today. - Dayton Marcos, at Schorling's Park."

Chicago, IL
"Dayton Marcos Here Sunday - The Marcos of the Western circuit of the new league are coming here with a team that is expected to give the American Gaints a hard tussel for the honor of winning the first league contest between these two clubs. The Marcos proved mighty tough foe for the American Giants last season, taking the local pastimers into camp here on the home grounds by a shut-out and later going 13 innings at Dayton before the Foster crowd could tab up a win. The Marcos downed the Giants in a game later and thus gained the honor for being the real stumbling block for the locals. This year the Marcos have a team composed of just enough youngsters with a sprinkling of vets to balance the aggregation to a smooth running maching; they have won all games played this season, recently taking the strong Weidmans of Cincinnati, Ohio into their camp; they won over the champion Gyms of their city and down the All Italians one of the strongest semi-pro teams of the country. George Britt, the star pitcher that Foster has tried for three years or more to land for the local team, is with the Marcos. George Britt is one of the really classy slab performers that constantly refuses to hook up with such teams as the A.B.C.s, American Giants and other teams of great prestige; he is the sort of pitcher who takes delight in swinging in with teams supposedly inferior in class to the big fellows, then when the boss team coms around, his main stunt is to beat them. George Britt downed the A.B.C.s a few seasons ago in an exhibition game with the American Giants at Cincinnati; then he hurled for the A.B.C.s and put the kibosh on the Cuban Stars. The Marcos have a string of hurlers that can be depended upon to show class in any sort of going, while their infield has a little best of the majority of the circuit to date. John Cunningham at short, Cary at third, Jim Taylor at second, with Bruce Hocker at first, frames up in experience, fielding and general class to a level with any of the inner works on the new circuit. Center Fielder George Brown is one of the most dependable players in the game today, while Willie Gray and Isaac Lane are young pitchers that will be heard from as they carry the goods that are bound to earn ready recognition of their prowess. Like the majority of the clubs, the Dayton Marcos have been fortunate in securing backstop material, David Wingfield, the first string man is said to measure up to the best forms that will be shown on the new circuit. The Marcos are here for a series and there is going to be a real battle, especially the games that George Britt works, as Rube always wants to beat a man who will not swing with him, and George Britt is just as anxious to show that he stays away for the purpose of getting a chance now and then to down the Foster crew."

Chicago, IL
"American Giants Walloped by the Dayton Marcos - Rube's Youngsters Blow Up in Pinch and Toss Off Game to the Visitors - Kansas City Monarchs Play Here Next - By Captain James H. Smith - In a contest replete with some of the wildest and uncanny plays perpetrated on a ball field, the Dayton Marcos one of the teams in the Western circuit, defeated the American Giants Sunday at Schorling's Park by the score of 6 to 5. The Daytons were literally presented with the game through the miserable fielding stunts of a couple of inexperienced recruits who were being given a try-out by the "chief," and who plainly showed effects of having stage fright from being suddenly changed from the bushes to fast company. Of course, the new hurler, Jack Marshall, was really responsible for putting his team in such a bad predicament by his inability to locate the platter, but with any kind of decent support would not have been scored upon but for several blunders on the part of the aforementioned recruits, as the visiting team only connected with his delivery for one safe hit, and that did not figure in the scoring of the runs. A bad throw to Ewing to stop a man stealing second started things going; then, with a runner trapped between third and the plate, he threw the ball to left field and two runs galloped across in the first inning. The Giants got one of them back in their half on a two-base hit by John Reese, followed by another by Christobal Torriente. Things went along well until the third inning, when with two out Lane secured the only hit made off Jack Marshall; then two bases on balls, coupled with three errors by Wingfield, at shortstop, gave the Daytons four runs, bringing their total to six. At this point Rube injected the old heads into the game, and the Giants set about trying to drag the old game out of the fire, and were only prevented from doing so by some swell pitching by Wilson, who had relieved Lane when the Giants were threatening to make good. This, with some of the freakiest kind of breaks ever seen in a ball game, combined to stop the home club just one run shy of a tie, and the game finished that way in spite of the fact Rube rushed up some heavy reinforcements at the crucial moment, who tried hard, but could not produce the necessary tally to tie it up. The large crowd completely unnerved the youngsters, and they will have to have more seasoning before they can hope to make good in fast company. Dave Brown, who relieved Marshall in the fourth inning, pitched a remarkable game, holding the hard-hitting Daytons to a solitary hit and striking out ten men. He pitched to only three men per inning, beginning with the fourth, and if the Giants could have scored one more run for him he would have easily defeated the visitors, as they could not fathom his benders at all. Christobal Torriente was the leading hitter, securing three of the Giants' hits, including a two-base wallop that scored the first run for the home team."

Chicago, IL
"Marcos, 6; American Giants, 5. - Dayton Marcos defeated the American Giants, 6 to 5, in a game of few hits but many bases on balls and errors."

May 22, 1920

Chicago, IL
"Big Game Saturday - In order to satisfy the popular demand of the fans for another look at the Marcos the team has been held over and will play the American Giants Saturday at Schorling Park. George Britt, the great all around players, will pitch for the Marcos and "Rube" will pit Southpaw Dan (Dave) Brown against the Dayton star. Game at 3 p.m."

May 23, 1920

Chicago, IL
"Chicago American Giants 6, Kansas City Monarchs 5, in 11 innings."

Chicago, IL
"Sunday, May 23 - Kansas City Monarchs N.N.L. vs. American Giants at Chicago, Illinois"

Chicago, IL
"K.C. Monarchs Here Sunday - With the new baseball circuit launched out in full swing of their schedule, the devotees of baseball in Chicago are in for a lamping of some real attraction in baseball from now on until the curtain is finally rung down on the close of the season. Sunday, May 23, the Monarchs of Kansas City will open up at the local park and they will go through a five-game series against Foster's American Giants. The Kansas City group have been going big guns since they started their invasion of the territory East of the big river. They set a pace at St. Louis that was killing and jumped from that point to Indianapolis, where they got away to a ten-inning win in their first game against the A.B.C.s. the K.C.s have a team composed of a mixture of nations: Mendez, the great Cuban player, is field captain, and he has surrounded himself with Portuondo, the flashy Cuban third sacker; with Rodriguez, another Cuban of much baseball note, doing the catching for the team. Frank Blukoi Blattner, a filipino, is the regular second baseman and he is one of the most dependable and experienced players in the game today. One or two of the players have the good, old Indian blood coursing through their veins, so this combination of talent gives the K.C.s that fighting caste that is always sure to make the contests just what the fans most desire. This gang are on their toes from tap of the going until the last man is dead; they play with life and pep, carrying the fight to the other fellows, wielding the willows, with dire effect as they go along. John Donaldson, the great southpaw pitcher, is with this gang, and he is playing in the best form that he has shown in years. The pitchers of the club are youngsters of husky build and they are primed to go through long drawn out battles, being schooled to give and take, reserving enough for a hurricane finish if it comes to that. Edgar "Blue" Washington, who has been featured recently in the motion picture, "The Haunted House," is playing first base for the K.C.s, and he is not only a grand fielder, but he is one of the heaviest batters in the game today. The Monarch, perhaps, has one of the greatest outfields on the circuit. Hurley McNair in left has always been rates as one of the game's greatest hitters and fielders, while Donaldson, when not pitching, shapes up to the very best in the outer works. George Carr, a fielder from the coast, flashes streaks of greatness and is believed to be one of the most timely hitters, fastest runners and right up to the best as the fielder and run getter. Rube Currie is one of the shining lights on the pitching roster of the new circuit and Lightner, Sam Crawford, Harris and one or two others give the far west crowd an edge on the slab that is hard to offset. At any rate the five-game series here will give the fans a real line on just what sort of show the American Giants have in the new circuit. The local machine has not been running smoothly here of late, so if they get away to a win or an even break with the Monarchs, with the latter's already proof that they are as good, if not better, than any on the circuit, then that should be a morsel of consolation to the admirers of the local team, and should buoy the local players up to the point where they will jump out in front and stay there."

Chicago, IL
"American Giants Win in 11th - Plucky Fight of Visiting Pitcher Goes for Naught When Teammates Falter - By Dave Wyatt - More than 7,000 persons witnessed the hand-to-hand battle between the Kansas City Monarchs and American Giants last Sunday. It was a sort of tug-of-war affair, with honors just about even as well as errors and faulty judgement. Rube Currie, a youngster right off the bush circuit, was forced to measure his skill as a pitcher with the American Giants' crack moundsman, Lefty Brown, and college boy Tom Williams. Rube Currie pulled up on the short end of the score, but after going through the blanket of fire that he did for 11 innings, with his teammates pulling all sorts of depressing stunts and the Foster crowd engineering every trick in the books, young Rube Currie acquired instead of losing prestige. Southpaw Dave Brown couldn't get his arm to function up to the regular standard, so was relayed, by Tom Williams, the latter getting in on the receiving end of a hot reception, but pulled through to a win after letting out all that he had. The Kansas City catchers put the visitors in an awful hole, especially Rodriguez, while Dink Mothell was flashy in spots, but wobbled in the pinches. The Monarchs appear to carry as much class as batsmen, the outfield, perhaps, being one, if not the best, in the circuit. With the infield all shaped up and the catching a little more steadier, the Kansas City crowd might be a grand choice for front runners all the way in the new circuit. The Monarchs open their home park Saturday, May 29, and C.I. Taylor's A.B.C.s are their opponents. The teams go through Sunday, Decoration Day, on into five games. Kansas City plans the biggest blow-off of any city on the circuit for the opening, and as the Elks of that city are behind the noise-making, we look for all records for opening attendance to be smashed. The two teams have broke even on the games plyaed between themselves so far, so the series at Kansas City will be hard fought. In the meantime the American Gaints will have the time of their lives trying to down the Cubans, who start at Schorling Park Sunday, May 30, and go Decoration Day and on into a five-game series."

May 24, 1920

Chicago, IL
"American Giants Beat Kansas City Monarchs - The American Giants won their second game of the series from the Monarchs of Kansas City yesterday, beating them 5 to 0 at Schorling's Park. Lieutenant Tom Johnson did the hurling for the Giants and had the visitors at his mercy. He allowed but three scattered hits, a pinch hitter getting one of them in the ninth. A catch by Gans was the fielding feature. The third game of the series will be played this afternoon."

Chicago, IL
"Monarchs Lose Second - Tom Johnson worked the second game of the series against the Kansas City Monarchs, and the American Giants won by the shut-out route. Sam Crawford pitched for the Monarchs. The latter received rocky support. Score 5 to 0."

May 25, 1920

Chicago, IL
"Giants Score Another Victory Over Monarchs - The American Giants scored another victory over the Monarchs of Kansas City, beating them at Schorling's Park yesterday. Tom Marshall twirled airtight ball for the winners, holding the Monarchs to four hits. He would have whitewashed his opponents but for an error. The same teams play again today."

May 26, 1920

Chicago, IL
"Foster's Giants Win Another - The American Giants won from the Monarchs of Kansas City beating them 3 to 2 at Schorling's Park. It was the fourth straight victory for Rube Foster's nine. The final game of the series to be played this afternoon."

May 27, 1920

Chicago, IL
"American Giants Win Again - The American Giants won the final game of the series with the Monarchs of Kansas City, beating them 6 to 5. Catcher Rodriguez dropped a throw at the plate that allowed the Giants to score in the eighth."

May 28, 1920

Chicago, IL
"Logan Squares Beaten by American Giants - Bill Harley was nearly the whole show in the game at Logan Square, where the home team was defeated, 8 to 3, by the American Giants. Harley clouted a triple in the first with the sacks loaded. Gibby Nelson was hit hard."

May 29, 1920

Chicago, IL
"Logan Squares Beaten by American Giants - Bill Harley was nearly the whole show in the game at Logan Square, where the home team was defeated, 8 to 3, by the American Giants. Harley clouted a triple in the first with the sacks loaded. Gibby Nelson was hit hard."

Chicago, IL
"American Giants on a Rampage - Goster's rejuvinated crew downs all competitors, winning six straight against three of their toughest foes. The work of the American Giants in the past week points very much to them, not only as the class of the new baseball circuit, but the dazzling work of the teams has once more established a strong belief on the part of the devotees of baseball here that Chicago has a team that can be depended upon for those same winning conquests that have surrounded their efforts in the past. The Foster team perhaps has the strongest pitching staff in the country today, and their infield has the edge on all so far seen for the present. Although the Detroit Stars and A.B.C.s inner works are right onto the heels of the locals. The outfield may not lead, but they compare favorably with any on the circuit; but in speed of limbs, inside knowledge of play and general efficiency it would appear that the local team has an edge on its rivals that is going to be stubbornly contested before supremacy is finally yielded. The Giants downed the strong Monarchs in a five game series, put the bees to buzzing in the bonnets of the Logan Squares of the Chicago League and trounced the Cubans. They lock horns with the Magnets of the Chicago League Sunday and a spirited go is expected. The Americans leave town Sunday night and they will shy off to St. Louis, where they fight it out for five days against the St. Louis Giants. The Mound City crew has a big club this year and have been making it awfully warm for all teams of the new circuit. They went 11 innings last week against the A.B.C.s and only succumbed after 11 innings of the fiercest kind of fighting by the score of 1 to 0. The Americans return here and their next league opponents will be C.I. Taylor's A.B.C.s who will show up here for Sunday, June 13."

May 30, 1920

Chicago, IL
"Schorling Park, Chicago, Illinois - Sunday, May 30, Decoration Day - Cuban Stars vs. American Giants 5 Game Series."

Chicago, IL
"Cuban Stars Here - The famous Cuban Stars will be the next aggregation of ball tossers to tackle the American Giants. The Cubans start their battling here Sunday, May 30, and will go on through Decoration Day and a series of weekday scraps. The Cubans have a real team and many faces new to the fans. They have managed, though handicapped by cold, wet weather, to break even on the series played with the A.B.C.s and they fought the Detroit Stars to a level. Hernandez will make his initial bow to the fans and he is one of the brainiest pitchers that has come over from the islands in a long spell. In Bill Drake the fans will see a hard hitting and fast outfielder, one of Cuba's best. Lopez is one of the best fielding third sackers in the game and Herrera and Valdez, also Guerra, can be depended upon to put up an article of ball that will please. The boy wonder, Abrien, is catching in that form that made him the favorite of the baseball populace last year and Baro is hitting and fielding in a manner that is depressing to all opponents. Manager Molina has found hopes of reinforcements by the time he gets here; so with the men who are expected from Havana, with those already here going good, the fans of Schorling Park are in for some real pastiming next week."

May 31, 1920

Chicago, IL
"American Giants Win Another From Cubans - Another record crowd turned out at Shorling's Park to see the American Giants win the second straight game from the Cubans, 3 to 2. The third game will be played this afternoon, Count José Leblanc and Lieutenant Tom Johnson hooked up in a twirling duel, the latter having the best of it, holding the Islanders to three hits. The Giants got seven hits off José Leblanc, four of them going to Cristóbal Torriente."

Chicago, IL
"Schorling Park, Chicago, Illinois - Monday, May 31st - Cuban Stars vs. American Giants."

June 1, 1920

Chicago, IL
"Cubans Drop Another to American Giants - By hitting the ball hard, the American Giants won another game from the Cubans, beating them 7 to 5, at Schorling's Park yesterday. The fourth game of the series will be played this afternoon."

Chicago, IL
"Amer. Giants, 7; Cubans, 5. - The hard hitting American Giants won another game from Cuban Giants, 7 to 5, at Schorling Park yesterday. The fourth game of the series will be played today."

June 2, 1920

Chicago, IL
"Cubans and Giants Play Today at Schorling's - The game scheduled for yesterday between the American Giants and the Cubans had to be called off on account of rain. It will be played this afternoon, and it will be the only game in Chicago, for the Cubs and Sox are out of town. Lieutenant Tom Johnson will dod the hurling for the Giants while the Islanders will depend on José Hernández."

June 3, 1920

Chicago, IL
"12 Straight For Schorlings - The American Giants won their twelfth straight game yesterday, defeating the Cubans, 3 to 2, in thirteen innings. Three errors in the final inning lost the game for the Islanders. Jack Marshall fanned thirteen."

June 5, 1920

Danville, IL
"American Giants, 7; Danville, 0. - Danville, Illinois, June 5. - The American Giants won their thirteenth straight today, defeating the locals, 7 to 0."

June 6, 1920

Chicago, IL
"Schorling Park, Chicago, Illinois, Sunday June 6. Magnets of Chicago League -vs- Chicago American Giants."

Chicago, IL
"Magnets Are Easy for Giants - Rube Foster's rejuvinated charges, lead by the chief himself, pulled everything on the Magnets of the Chicago League, except stealing bases in reverse direction. Tom Williams had one of his good days on and the leaguers were at his mercy all the way. Conlon, the crack southpaw of the Chicago prairies and big league tryout, released a pretty good mechanical show of heaving, but when put to the test on inside play the southpaw went up and his mates went with him. The Americans piled up enough stolen bases, pulled enough bunts and squeezed enough runs across the pan to last for a season. The Giants left for St. Louis Sunday night, where they were scheduled for five games. If they annex the series they will have won 19 straight games. Sunday, June 14, C.I. Taylor's A.B.C.'s, with Oscar Charleston, Connie Day, Ben Taylor, and other stars will tackle the American Giants at Schorling Park."

June 7, 1920

St. Louis, MO
"Tom Johnson's Pitching Defeats Giants, 10-1 - Tom Johnson's clever pitching was too much for the St. Louis Giants and they went down in defeat by a score of 10 to 1 to the Chicago American Giants. Bill Drake was hit hard and given poor support, which enabled the visitors to pile up their big score. The second game will be played today."

St. Louis, MO
"Special - Rube Foster's American Giants, June 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 at St. Louis, Missouri."

June 8, 1920

St. Louis, MO
"Chicago Giants Win From St. Louis Team - Dave Brown, pitching for the Chicago Giants, held St. Louis to three hits. Luther Farrell pitched good ball for the local team, but errors helped the visitors to all of their scores, three of the four errors aiding in the scoring of runs. Charlie Blackwell got all of the Giants' three hits."

June 9, 1920

St. Louis, MO
"St. Louis Giants Lose Third Straight, 6-0 - Inability to hit Jack Marshall's pitching and loose play in the field was the main cause of the Giants' third straight defeat at the hands of the strong Chicago team. The fourth game of the current series will be played today."

June 10, 1920

St. Louis, MO
"St. Louis Giants Win From Chicago Team, 3-2 - Bill Drake's good pitching and hitting enabled St. Louis to defeat Chicago, 3 to 2, yesterday. The local pitcher made two hits, both of which counted in the runmaking. Eugene Moore lead the hitters with three hits in five attempts. The final game of the series will be played today."

June 11, 1920

St. Louis, MO
"St. Louis Giants Drop Final to Chicago, 6-3 - St. Louis Giants yesterday lost the final game to Chicago, 6 to 3. Bingo DeMoss and Dave Malarcher lead the hitters with two hits each out of three times at bat. Eugene Moore made a great play when he scored from second base on an infield out. The Giants play in Kansas City next week."

June 12, 1920

Chicago, IL
"On the Circuit - All the circuit teams were up against each other sure on Decoration Day and they ran off some mighty good games, many going into extra innings. But the most satisfactory part of the whole affair is the fact that 66,000 persons paid to see the circuit teams perform. When the Taylor A.B.C.s show up in Chicago Sunday, June 13, all records for attendance are expected to be broken. With Oscar Charleston, perhaps the greatest player of the Race, going like a house afire, the A.s are drawing big everywhere. Taylor's gang holds the record for big drawing, or did until the Cubans drew out 16,000 here at their recent appearance. Taylor would have beaten that some years ago, but the fans broke down the fence and hundreds came in without the count. At that they played to 15,000. All previous records are expected to be smashed Sunday when the A.s show. If the St. Louis Giants have a leg to stand on when Rube and his gang are finished fighting them, they will jump over to Kansas City, where, starting Saturday the 12th, they play the Monarchs for five days. Needless to say, they will meet with stiff opposition, for the far west crowd is putting up a nifty game."

Chicago, IL
"McCoys, 6; American Giants, 4. - Milwaukee, Wisconsin, June 12. - The McCoy-Nolans downed the American Giants of Chicago today, 6 to 4. The McCoys rallied in the eighth, pounding in four runs."

June 13, 1920

Chicago, IL
"Sunday, June 13, 1920 - A.B.C's vs. American Giants at Chicago, Illinois. Games called at 3:00 p.m."

Chicago, IL
"A.B.C.'s are Beaten as First Overflow Crowd Witnesses Trouncing of Indians. - Chicago, Illinois - After putting the works to St. Louis and holding their own at Kansas City, the A.B.C.'s jumped over to Omaha and won two, they downed Gary, Indiana Saturday, but they were pulled up with a terrific smash, Sunday, when they tackled the American Giants. The defeat reads 9 to 1; at that the A.'s looked better than the score indicates. Jim Jeffries pitched a fair game, but his support in the close places went woozy and the Hoosier bats failed to work when toll meant runs. Rube Foster's gang had blanket orders on Oscar Charleston, and the speed boy couldn't pull a thing. Day put on a good show at third. Morten Clark was at his best, and, despite the hoodoo that has been trailing the crew and the heartless manner that the American Giants have been slaughtering all comers, the A's look to hold their own if they get the pitching. The A.B.C's go to Detroit, Saturday and Sunday."

Chicago, IL
"Giants Victorious - Playing before one of the largest crowds of the season, the A.B.C.s of Indianapolis went down to defeat in their first game of a series of three against the American Giants. Tom Williams held the heavy hitting squadron of the A.'s safe all the way, the most dangerous batsmen being unable to negotiate his offerings with any effect. Jim Jeffries pitched fairly good ball for the Hoosiers, but his support was a little off color, the Giants taking advantage of every little slip and seemingly turning the same into scores. The feature of the contest was the batting of Cristóbal Torriente, who released a fine exhibition of fielding, running and all round play. Connie Day for the visitors put up a highly pleasing game at third, but for some unknown reason the old A. machine did not function up to the standard of former years. However, the C.I. Taylor crew have been up against hard lines for some weeks, having either lost or released the pitchers of much class here of late. Big Ed Rile, Owens and Herlen Raglan put the A's up against a mighty tough position when their failure to ob(illegible) the proper deportment resulted in them casting their lot with others on the Taylor crowd. The club has been up against their regular second sackers, having already had three. The Hoosiers go to Detroit, where they open against the Detroit Stars on Saturday, play Sunday and a series. In the meantime the American Giants will try next Sunday to get on even terms with Rogers Parks, one of the Chicago League teams that dished out a beating to them earlier in the season. Rain prevented the second game of the series between the Giants and the A.B.C.'s scheduled for Monday."

June 14, 1920

Chicago, IL
"Rain prevented the second game of the series between the Giants and the A.B.C.s scheduled for Monday."

June 15, 1920

Chicago, IL
"A's Lose Two Games. - Chicago, Illinois, June 15 - The A.B.C.'s were defeated twice here this afternoon by the American Giants by the scores of 6 to 2 and 7 to 0. Dizzy Dismukes was wild in the first game and was succeeded by Dicta Johnson. Jim Jeffries went the route in the second game, but lost because of poor support."

June 26, 1920

Muncie, IN
"A's Drop Tough One. - Rube Foster's Club Beats Locals, 5-4, In a Fast Game. - Muncie, Indiana. - June 26 - The American Giants, of Chicago. leaders in the Western Colored League, took a hard fought game from C.I. Taylor's A.B.C.'s here this afternoon, 5 to 4. The Indianapolis club had opportunities to put the game away in the late innings, sensational fielding cutting off several hits and runs. Cristóbal Torriente scored the winning run in the fifth on his hit, DeWitt's error on J. Brown, Judy Gans's infield out and Leroy Grant's sacrifice to left field. Hits by Powell, George Shively, Wesley Clark and Oscar Charleston, together with Day's walk, let four across for the A's in the third. The A's had a good chance to cop in the sixth, but the rally fizzled. Frank Wickware walked Oscar Charleston, Ben Taylor and Brown, but George Shively forced Oscar Charleston at the plate and DeWitt fanned. George Shively's fielding and Ben Taylor's one-handed catch of a high line drive were the fielding features."

Indianapolis, IN
"DAVE BROWN - Dave Brown, crack pitcher of American Giants, he will be seen in action here in the big series between the A's and American Giants, the fans who journeyed to Chicago and saw him shut the A's out 1-0, are fearing that he will repeat when the Giants start him. He is some pitcher."

Indianapolis, IN
"Rube Foster, Bull of Basham - Leaders of American Giants, who will invade Indianapolis Sunday, Foster's club is leading club in league. They have won; Five straight from Kansas City, 4 from Cuban Stars, 1 out of 5 from St. Louis, 1 from Chicago Giants and broke even with the Dayton Marcos, and handed A.B.C.'s three crushing defeats the past week. He has been the guiding star. Foster Biggest Speculator Ever in Game - All the big money deals engineered in colored base ball, he has been the guiding hand. Last season, he paid $1,750.00 for Navin Field two days, and made over $4,000.00 on the venture. He has refused $2,000.00 a Sunday to play his club East. C.I. Taylor offered Foster percentage on 12,000 paid admissions, rain or shine, to come to Indianapolis, yet Foster refused. Said he would gamble on his chances. The big fellow is lucky in his ventures, and always has proved his judgment once accepted was the best thing. - Colored Base Ball Lucky to Have Foster - All the managers through the Western circuit are praising Foster. They unanimously claim that his wonderful resources are unbelieveable. May and june, considered bad baseball months before, Foster has manipulated the clubs that up to date, not one of the Western clubs has received less than $1,000 for each Sunday this season. Each city is drawing better than, at any other time in the history. - Foster's Club Biggest Drawing Card in Base Ball. - The American Giants, under Foster, have proven time and time again, that they are the best card in base ball, and when they appear here Sunday, he will be greeted by the largest attendance that have ever seen two clubs of color battle. People who never see games, always go when Rube comes to town. He has a following of ministers, doctors, lawyers, teachers and from every profession and all walks of life. He has the confidence of all that has ever met him. His friends are numbered by the millions. Fans here are waiting to see him again. Indianapolis opens her doors to him."

"JAMES BROWN - James Brown, Catcher of the American Giants, this star will be seen here in action with the American Giants. He has no superior as a catcher, he is sure death to base runners. Fans of Indianapolis will have their first time to see him in action. Those of us who journeyed to Chicago are sorry we saw him, among the saddest, Morten Clark, George Shively and Oscar Charleston."

June 27, 1920

Indianapolis, IN
"Look Here Fans - Standing of the Clubs of the Western Circuit of the Proposed Negro National Base Ball League. - These figures are based on a percentage of won and lost and are for all game splayed up to week of June 27th:

Chicago, IL
* Same article, from the Chicago Defender

Indianapolis, IN
"A.B.C.'s On Home Ground Win 2, Tie 2 and Lose 1 to Rube Foster's American Giants - Tenny Blount's Detroit Stars Here Sunday. - Big Crowd Sees A.B.C.'s Win 1-0. - Brace of Errors in the Tenth Give Locals the Game and End Fierce Pitching Duel Between Ed Rile and Dave Brown. - By Dave Wyatt. - Playing before one of the largest audiences ever assembled at a base ball game in this city, the American Giants of Chicago, and A.B.C.s, the local pets, went ten innings, every one being replete with thrills. Big Ed Rile, the main pitcher on the A. squad, to all appearances, pitched a sort of ragged game, giving out a whole string of base on balls; but the fact remains, the Chicago boys could only touch him safely about four times, so the undeniable fact that so many were able to reach a base and then the visitors were unable to cross the goal to scoredom, it must be admited that Ed Rile either knew his lines or the A.'s got him out of some mighty tough holes. Dave Brown, Rube's classy southpaw, pitched a game, which under ordinary conditions, should have brought a win; seemingly all the breaks went against the Giants' twirler, as his mates had glaring opportunities for pushing over markers, but just as the time appeared ripe for such a scene, and it was two or three, the batter was either outguessed, a sign went wrong, or a flashy play on the part of some A. cropped up to blast all hopes. The A's did not have the chances that the visitors did, as Brown held them to two hits for the ten innings, and that time but two of the locals had reached third; one advanced that far in the ninth and the A's looked to have a grand chance, but a pinch hiter could not produce the thrill stuff, and the opening was tossed to the discard. However, in the tenth the visitors began to show signs of wavering under the gruel of the fierce battling; when DeWitt came up, he hit towards Bingo DeMoss, the fielder intercepted the hit, handling it perfectly, but he wild-pegged to first and the runner was safe. Day, following, hit to Dave Brown, who also heaved to first in a manner that did not permit of a put-out. Big Ed Rile came up, he had been hitting them hard and far away and in tough luck; this time he caught hold of one of Brown's best offerings, slammed it straight at short-stop Bobby Williams, the latter fielded it in grand style, but unfortunately, the ball fell from his hands to the ground, and DeWill romped across, with the winning and only score of the ten inning affair."

Indianapolis, IN
"Foster's Giants, Color Loop Leaders, to Play A.B.C.'s Here Sunday. - Rube Foster's American Giants, of Chicago, said by many to be the fastest colored baseball club in the country, will be the attraction at Washington Park Sunday, meeting C.I. Taylor's A.B.C.s in a double-header, the first game starting at 2 o'clock. Foster's team has not been seen here for a number of seasons, and it is expected to prove a big drawing card. The famous Chicago aggregation is now leading all clubs in the Colored Baseball League and is putting up a real article of ball. The A.B.C.'s, who are ending their series at Detroit, with the Detroit colored club, are in third place in the colored loop standing. Since taking the long road trip, which comes to a close this week, Manager C.I. Taylor has run into plenty of bad luck. His second baseman, Samuel DeWitt, received a broken ankle in one of the road series and is now here. Then one of his pitchers, Ed Rile, jumped the club, and on top of this Oscar Charleston, star Center Fielder, injured his leg and was slowed up a great deal. To top things off, both of his catchers, Russell Powell and Mitchell Murray, were injured, and Taylor had to grab on to an inexperienced receiver."

"A.B.C.'s and American Giants Open Here Sunday. - After playing at Muncie tomorrow, C.I. Taylor's A.B.C.'s will return to Washington Park for a stay of five weeks and some of the fastest colored teams will be seen in action here. The Indianapolis club has been a month on the road, breaking a little better than even in games won and lost, but Manager C.I. Taylor lays a number of defeats to his crippled lineup and now that his team is almost in full fighting force again, he is ready to show the home folks how his club is up in the race for the Western Colored League championship. Two games will be staged Sunday, the A's meeting the famous American Gaints, of Chicago, the team that is setting the pace in the colored loop. Rube Foster's aggregation from the Windy City is rated as the best colored club in the country. Single contests will be played Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday, The first Sunday scrap will start at 2 o'clock."

"A.B.C.'s Get New Pitcher for Game with Giants. - Manager Taylor, of the A.B.C.'s in order to attempt to take the coming series with Rube Foster's famous American Giants, of Chicago, was in New York yesterday after two players who would bolster the local colored club, and the As will trot out on the field Sunday with probably the strongest lineup they have had this season. Two contests will be staged Sunday, the first starting at 2 o'clock. C.I. Taylor landed Pitcher Ed Rile in New York, and stated that he would have another infielder when he got in town. Ed Rile will twirl the opening scrap. Samuel DeWitt, flashy second baseman, is still on the injured list. The speedy Windy City aggregation has not been seen in action in Indianapolis for four years and a great crowd is expected to turn out and witness the battles. Rube Foster's club is rated as the best colored team in the country and winning a series from the visitors is something to brag about. The A.B.C.s are now in full fighting force and will be working hard in order to show the home folks what they are made of."

"A.B.C.'s Defeat Giants. - C.I. Taylor's A.B.C.'s defeated Rube Foster's American Giants, of Chicago, in a ten-inning scrap at Washington Park Sunday afternoon, 1 to 0, and the team tied 2-2 in a five-inning scrap that was stopped at 6 o'clock because of the Sunday law. More than 7,000 people saw the games. Ed Rile pitched both games for the A.B.C.'s and his hitting won the first game for the local club. The same teams play today, Tuesday, and Wednesday."

Indianapolis, IN
"Foster's Crew Blanked by A.B.C.s - By Dave Wyatt - Indianapolis, Indiana, July 2. - More than 8,000 persons witnessed the struggle for supremacy between the American Giants and the A.B.C.s of this city last Sunday, in which Pitchers Ed Rile and Dave Brown palmed out to be the dualists of the fray. After ten innings of the fiercest fighting ever witnessed on a baseball bield the unbiased fan would call honors even, both as to pitchers and general team play; in fact Ed Rile was up against the toughest going most of the way as Rube had his gang on their toes all the route, and with the big A's pitcher walking on an average of two men per inning and the Chicago crew running bases with reckless abandon, that strategy board of the Hoosiers was kept busy, as the Foster crowd pulled everything in the book. But the kind hand of Providence, according to the Indiana folks, seemed to away in the A.s behalf. Ed Rile was well entitled to the honors earned, for the Chicago boys had many chances for a knockout blow, but upon each attempt to put over a stopper to the doings some one either lost his lines, they were outguessed or the breaks went against them. At any rate, the As had no such openings for a win, as none of them were fortunate enough to reach third base until the ninth; then, with Oscar Charleston on third and apparently a grand chance to end the fight, C.I. Taylor elected to put over the big noise punch by acting as a pinch hitter. He didn't come close and, incidentally, caused much pain among his supporters. However, in the tenth, with no one out, the strain began to show on the Chicagoans. Samuel Dewitt hit to Bingo DeMoss, who threw wild to Leroy Grant at first, the runner acquiring the base; Connie Day hit to Dave Brown; the pitcher also threw wild. With two on the hassocks, Big Ed Rile, who had been smashing them hard all day, but in some waiting hands, took hold of one of Dave Brown's shoots. It went straight to Bobby Williams at shortstop, but proved too hot for the little fellow, so the blow let down the bars to victory for the Hoosier crew. Big Ed Rile pitched the second game also, but the closing law stopped what looked like another duel between him and Tom Johnson. The second game ended in a deadlock, 2-2."

June 28, 1920

Indianapolis, IN
"Monday's Thriller - The A.B.C.'s and Rube Foster's American Giants staged an unsatisfactory 10-inning tie game, Monday. In the abscense of the regular umpire, C.I. Taylor officiated, and being confronted with many close decisions, brought forth kicking from both sides. However, his work pleased many."

Indianapolis, IN
"Giants and A.B.C.'s Tie - After battling ten long innings the American Giants and the A.B.C.'s ended their third game at Washington Park Monday afternoon in an 8-8 tie. The same teams play again this afternoon. To date, in the present series, the A.B.C.'s have won one game, and two games have been ties."

June 29, 1920

Indianapolis, IN
"Rube's American Giants Fall in Tuesday's Game. Giants 5, A.B.C.'s 6."

Indianapolis, IN
"A.B.C.'s Win Again. - The A.B.C.'s again trounced Rube Foster's American Giants at Washington Park yesterday afternoon. The score was 6 to 5. The windup of the series was to be played this afternoon provided rain did not interfere and the local team was confident of making a sweep of the series. Four games have been played and the A.B.C.'s have won two and tied two. The Chicago stars were outclassed at the bat yesterday."

June 30, 1920

Indianapolis, IN
"American Giants Cop the Final Game From A's 6 to 2. - Rube Foster's American Giants took the final game of the series with C.I. Taylor's A.B.C.'s at Washington Park Wednesday afternoon, 6 to 2. It was the only contest of the series that the Widy City aggregation was able to cop. Taylor's club grabbed one scrap Sunday and took Tuesday's affair, while two of the games were tied. Dizzy Dismukes and Jim Jeffries were the pitchers used by Taylor in an attempt to halt the Giants. Although getting but seven blows, Foster's team harched them and got the "breaks" of the contest. The A's gathered nine safeties in all, but they were good for only two runs. The Indianapolis colored stars started right off in the 1st inning with a run, but Foster's team grabbed one in the second, and three in the fourth. Sunday, Monday, and Tuesday, the Detroit Stars, who are resting in second place in the Western Colored Base Ball League, will be seen in action here against the A's. Some more classy baseball is expected. A single contest will be staged Sunday, with two scraps Monday and a single game Tuesday."

July 3?, 1920

Chicago, IL
"Big Circuit Games for 4-5. - The Cuban Stars, who have just completed a swing around the circuit, will tackle the American Giants in Chicago, at Schorling Park, Sunday, July 4th."

July 5, 1920

Chicago, IL
"Rogan Pitched Kansas City Monarchs to a 4 to 2 Victory."

Chicago, IL
"K.C. Monarchs Win First. Giants 2, Monarchs 4. Batteries - Dave Brown, Jim Brown, George Dixon; Bullet Rogan and Vicente Rodríguez."

Chicago, IL
"Rogan Stops the American Giants - By Dave Wyatt - Uncle Sam has just recently turned loose a whole flock of baseball players from his army of athletes; St. Louis Giants grabbed three classy boys, one a catcher who is said to be the peer of them all. When the Kansas City Monarchs fastened a hold on Bullet Rogan and Dobie Moore they gave the old baseball game a lift that will be felt throughout the entire circuit of the present organization. Pitcher Bullet Rogan acquired fame from the easy manner in which he was able to defeate the All American baseball teams that invaded the Island where the 25th regiment was stationed; several players from the big leagues declared him to be a wonder, so Manager Wilkinson signed him early last spring; the boy made a three nights' ride and jumped out with strange support, facing one of the best teams in the country and gave an exhibition of hurling that had 10,000 fans yelping and the American Giants standing on their heads. Bingo DeMoss, who had hit a home run in a morning game, was the ony player able to tap the offering of Rogan to safe and sound territory. Bullet Rogan stopped the Giants after they had won six straight games, the A.B.C.s, Daton Marcos, Normals of the City League and the Cubans being the victims. The St. Louis Giants, the team carded to tackle the locals here Sunday, have been tabbing win with alarming regularity here of late, and with the star players just released from the Army in the line the fans undoubtedly are in for some real pastiming for the series."

Chicago, IL
"K.C.'s Down Reuben in First. Americans Beat Cubans 1-0. - Chicago, Illinois Special - The American Giants' wild career of winning a long string of games was stopped Monday, when Rogan, a recent acquisition from the U.S.A. put a quietus in those hammering players of Rube Foster's and almost stopped their bats from working all together. The Army lad was as wild as they come, giving many bases on balls, but he was airtight in dangerous places, holding that highly spririted crew of Chicago well in (illegible) and beating them 4-2. Before the Westerners took the measure of the Foster crowd, they had piled up a string of six straight wins, beating the A.B.C.'s, Marcos, Chicago leaguers and downed the Cubans. The Sunday game with the Cubans was won in the first inning, when Dave Malarcher cracked one of Pitcher José Hernández shoots for three sacks and was later scored on a slashing single to center off Bingo Demoss's bat."

Chicago, IL
"Food for Fans - By Charles A. Starks. - Hurrah! Hurrah! The mighty have fallen! Even though they get up again and regain their equilibrium, still the mighty have fallen. And this is so satisfying that we rejoice. The fall took place in the old home town, where the mighty may fondly expect that 70 percent of the favoritism (that if there be any) will naturally drift their way. All of which is to say that the Monarchs started their series of games with the American Giants Monday and brought home the bacon from large crowd. A telegraphic reports brought the very pleasing news that the Monarchs had won out in the first tussle with the redoubtable Foster Giants in an early afternoon wire, just when old Eighteenth Street was the tramping ground for the holiday strollers. So when the news came there was rejoicing. The close score and the meager hits counted were gratifying to local fans who demand that somebody play ball if they expect any attention from such August persons as themselves. The Monarchs got busy right off the reel and scored three in the first round. The Giants scored two in the third, and it was all for the day, except in the eighth round when the Kansas City boys surplused another one, making the score 4 to 2. Bullet Rogan, the Monarchs' new star pitcher, made the Giant men look like puriles in their efforts to safely connect with the ball - one little hit they received during the whole nine sessions. Rogan was kind to the Giants in the third, as he elected to favor two batters with a gift to first. Some Monarch then aided the spirit by committing grievous error just when someone was hitting to first - result, one hit, one score. The Giants managed to amass six hits off Brown, the Giants' star pitcher."

Chicago, IL
"Monarchs Hold Fosters to 1 Hit for 4-2 Triumph - American Giants were held to one hit by Bullet Rogan of the Kansas City Monarchs yesterday, and the visitors won the first game of the series at Schorling Park, 4 to 2. The Monarchs put victory on ice with three tallies in the first."

July 6, 1920

Chicago, IL
"Giants Beat K.C. Monarchs - The American Giants won an 8 to 6 game from the Kansas City Monarchs at Schorling's Park. Both teams hit the ball hard. The third game of the series will be played this afternoon."

Chicago, IL
"Foster's Giants Win From Kansas City Monarchs - The Kansas City Monarchs got their big bats to working early in the second game against the American Gaints, scoring four runs as early as the third inning and piling up seven hits off the delivery of Tom Johnson. Dobie Moore, the Army lad, hit in fiendish fashion, and the whole Kansas City crowd wielded with effect, netting them six funs as early as the sixth inning. The Giants waited out Crawford's offerings, securing several base on balls and they put the advantage to good use by stealing several bases, then by neatly executed maneuvering and a sprinkle of hits, they pulled up from behind and took the Kansas City crowd into camp by the score of 8-6. Jack Marshall went in with the score tied and thus receives credit for the win, although Tom Williams finished the game, letting the K.C.s down without much effort."

Chicago, IL
"Tuesday's Game. - The American Giants won out in today's game, beating the Monarchs 8 to 6 in a well fought contest. Things looked good for the Kansas Citys up to the fourth round when the tide began to turn. The Giants got to the visitors for 14 hits, while the Monarchs got 10 off the Giants. Rube Foster wisely made two replacements in his mound performers."

Chicago, IL
"Kansas City Monarchs Lose, 8-6, to American Giants - The American Giants won an 8 to 6 game from the Kansas City Monarchs at Schorling Park. Both teams hit the ball hard. The third of the series will be played this afternoon."

July 7, 1920

Chicago, IL
"American Giants win in 12th - The American Giants had to go twelve innings to beat the Kansas City Monarchs 2 to 1 yesterday at Schorling's Park. The same teams play today."

Chicago, IL
"Chicago, July 7. - The Kansas City Monarchs were defeated today by the Chicago American Giants in a 12-inning game, 2 to 1. Rube Currie pitched for the Monarchs. In the twelfth inning when he walked the first man, a hit by Bingo DeMoss and Torriente's sacrifice fly won the game. Jack Marshall was hit hard, but wonderful fielding by the Chicago club saved the game several times. Christobal Torriente, the Cuban outfielder for Chicago, and Dobie Moore, the Monarch's new shortstop, both starred at bat and in the field."

Chicago, IL
"American Giants Win in Twelfth Round, 2-1 - American Giants won in the twelfth inning against Kansas City Monarchs, 2 to 1, yesterday at Schorling Park, bunching singles for the winning run. The teams play again today."

July 8, 1920

Chicago, IL
"American Giants Win Again - American Giants defeated the Kansas City Monarchs, 6 to 1, yesterday at Schorling's Park. Tom Williams won in great form for the Giants, allowing but five scattered hits. Leroy Grant hit a home run in the third inning, scoring Judy Gans ahead of him."

July 11, 1920

Chicago, IL
"Giants Win From St. Louis - Frank Wickware and Bill Drake Stage Fierce Go with Honors Resting with the Veteran Heaver - Chicago, Illinois - Bill Drake, the young pitching star of the St. Louis Giants, found himself up against an awful force last Sunday, when he essayed to do things to the Foster crowd, with Frank Wickware, the hero of many a tough struggle opposed to him on the slab. The Windy City folks jumped right out in the first stanza and proceeded to put the game on ice, egged on, of course, by ragged support at the receiving end of the Mound City battery dished out to his mate. The visiting infield was thrown off their stride as a result of the catchers defection and displayed streaks of both good and bad, mostly the latter. Bill Drake pitched a good game and was entitled to a better deal than he received. Finding his support all to the fag, the pitcher went to it with renewed energy in each frame and succeeded in handling five different chances, all but three of the total assists of the whole team. Frank Wickware was master of the situation at all stages and convinced the ten thousand fans who watched his effort that he is but a whit below the form that made him the talk of the baseball world some seasons ago. The St. Louisians staged a batting rally in the ninth furnishing a welcome thrill, but the flash was squelched, the game ending 5 to 2, with the Windy City gang the winner."

Chicago, IL
"Fosters Trounce St. Louisians - By Dave Wyatt - Had young Bill Drake of the St. Louis Giants received that help from his mates that he was entitled to last Sunday there might be a different story to tell. As it was, after one of the most ragged exhibitions ever seen, in support of a pitcher, young Drake, as well as 10,000 fans, were forced to witness the ordeal of a whole flock of home players crossing the platter in a manner to indicate that the St. Louis crowd had their hands tied. Catcher Dan Kennard to all appearances was the worst offender in the first-aid ordeal to the home guards, the locals pushing three over the counter in the first spell. The visitors touched up the offering of the veteran Wickware to the tune of four safe hits, the greater portion of that number coming in the ninth, when the vet hurler checked up a notch or so; that little shift allowed the Mound City boys to score two runs and thus evade a shut-out. Drake received a great hand from crowd for the earnest effort that he made to win; he was on the difficult end of five of the assists that his team acquired, one being a double play, the whole outfit only tabbing eight assists. Wickware fanned six and Drake did as well; there was not much to choose between the two on steadiness, but the Windy City heaver grabbed better support, had more timely hitting behind him and thus won."

Chicago, IL
"Fosters Upset St. Louis Giants - Rube Foster's American Giants defeated St. Louis Giants, 5 to 2, at Schorling Pakr. Frank Wickware had an easy time for eight innings, but in the ninth St. Louis scored two runs on three hits and a walk. The same clubs play today."

July 12, 1920

Chicago, IL
"Giants Annex Another - Tom Williams again proved to the fans that no team in the circuit has much of a chance to beat him when with but little effort he held the St. Louis Giants to two runs and a small smattering of hits, while his mates grabbed four markers and the second game. Christobal Torriente and George Dixon seized the opportunity for a fattening of the bat average and each one tore off a single, double and a triple. Many of the others took a part in the bat-fest and thus gave Big Finner a warm reception, this being his first show here. The Dayton Marcos will open here next Sunday and the fans will get a real run for the time spent at the park. The Marcos have already downed the locals and they believe they can do it again; at any rate, they have the talent. In Lane, Alexander, Britt and Winfield the fans will have a chance to see a quartet of batters that are not excelled in the circuit and the big first baseman, Hocker, also Jim Taylor, each are liable to break up a game at any stage. The pitching staff of the Marcos is right up to the form of the best and from their recent showing against the locals it appears like safe and sane reasoning to figure them to have a real good chance to cop in the Sunday game."

Chicago, IL
"Foster's Giants Win Again, 4-2 - With the scored tied in the sixth inning and the bases full, Grant singled, counting two runs for a 4 to 2 win for American Giants over the St. Louis Giants at Schorling's Park. The same clubs play today."

July 13, 1920

Chicago, IL
"Fosters, 7; St. Louis, 6. - Opportune hits by Torriente and Grant were big factors in the 7 to 6 win of the American Giants over the St. Louis Giants at Schorling's Park. The same clubs play today."

July 17, 1920

Gary, IN
"Gary, Indiana. - Britt and Hocker, star players of the Dayton Marcos, suffered injuries in the game here last Saturday playing against the American Giants and will be out of the line-up for some weeks."

July 18, 1920

Chicago, IL
"Herlen Ragland Wild - Marcos Lose - Chicago, Illinois - Special - The Marcos were downed by the American Giants Sunday, when Herlen Ragland's wildness was mainly responsible for two runs and in the second frame when he did get the ball over, the Giants encountered but little difficulty in connecting with his offering. George Britt, one of the main stays of the Marcos was injured at Gary Saturday, and Bruce Hocker the first sacker also suffered along the same path and will be out for some time. Arthur Coleman, a big likely looking southpaw finished the game for the Daytons and displayed streaks of such form that may cause him to be heard from before the season closes. One of the largest crowds of the season watched the game."

Chicago, IL
"Marcos Lose to the Giants - By Dave Wyatt - Operating with a makeshift team, as a result of injuries to the important cogs in their playing machine, the Dayton Marcos were lucky to cross the platter in the game here Sunday against the league leaders. The Marco pitchers failed to hurl the ball so that it could be hit, so the Giants walked to first, then not a few of them stole near the whole route to the home base. The locals are bound to continue their lead on all circuit rivals unless some throwing catchers show up on the circuit soon and the pitchers learn to hold the men on bases. Tom Williams gave a grand exhibition of how to watch the bases and, incidentally, satisfied the huge throng of fans that he is the most efficient slab artist that the Giants have ever owned. The Marcos appear to have the material for a grand team, but it must be whipped into line, and like many of the other teams, that seems to be the real problem. There appears to be a dearth of field generals, that is, the sort like the old school used to boast of, and the Foster clan are pulling stuff on all circuit competitors that is making the show look amteaurish in the extreme. There is not a team on the circuit but what has material that measures in ability to the locals, but they have not the leaders who can instill that fighting spirit of do or die. Dad Johnson, Sol White, Earl, and others of the old school still live and are active; we are going to have more fighting on the diamond; the fans are tiring of a one-team league."

Chicago, IL
"Giants, 8; Dayton, 1. - An overflow crowd saw the American Giants hand the Dayton Marcos an 8 to 1 lacing at Schorling's Park. Tom Williams hurled effectively for the Giants, allowing only five scattered hits."

July 20, 1920

Chicago, IL
"Giants Beat Dayton Marcos - The American Giants won another game from the Dayton Marcos, beating them 3 to 1."

Chicago, IL
"Giants Win Again - Frank Wickware and Herlen Raglan engaged each other in the last game of the series here, and the former displayed superiority by being more steady in the pinches, striking out several men in close places, aiding his own victory by batting. The Giants played a snappy game, engineering two fast double plays, Catcher Brownbeing on the important end of both; in addition, the receiver pulled down the house when he hurldled the visitors' bench and grabbed a foul fly for a putout."

July 23, 1920

Chicago, IL
"League Standings, as of Friday, July 23."

July 24, 1920

Chicago, IL
"Melrose Parks Lose to Giants - Strunk's wildness, coupled with errors, gave the American Giants a 6 to 0 victory over the Melrose Parks."

Chicago, IL
"Wickware Holds Melrose Parks as Giants Win - Saturday Frank Wickware held the Melrose Park nine (white) to three hits at Schorling's Park and the American Giants won, 6 to 0. Cristóbal Torriente went to third in the place of Dave Malarcher, who is out of the game with a bum ankle. Strunk, the visiting pitcher, was a trifle wild and errors aided the home club in getting some of their tallies."

July 25, 1920

Chicago, IL
"American Giants Trouce Joliet, 6-0 - By Mister Fan - Schorling's Park, Sunday. - Everything was on tap this afternoon from threatened fist fights on down, and when the final out was made the Giants went home on the long end of a 6 to 0 score. The game started late, owing to the presentation of a beautiful silk American flag to the 8th regiment (370th A.E.F.) after a regimental review and the presentation of a huge silver loving cup to Col. Otis B. Duncan by the Negro Business Men's league of this city. Mickey Ryan was on the mound for the visitors, while Tom Williams did the twirling for Rube. It looked lik a pitchers' battle from the start and Tom had the best of the argument by his ability to catch men off bases. Arron, the third sacker of the Joliet nine, evidently was cut out for a prize fighter from his actions, but he cooled down considerably when the umpire threatened not only to put him off the field but to mix it with him. Jelly Gardener scored the first run for the Giants in the fourth; with one gone he singled and was promptly sacrificed to second by Bingo DeMoss, Christobal Torrienti walked and Brown hit a slow roller down the third base line, which Ryan fielded too slow to get the batter going to first. He was so amazed that his mates yelled for him to get Jelly Gardener, who had come all the way from second and was legging it home. Seeing himself trapped, he jockeyed up and down between third and home, finally being deliberately blocked and the run was allowed to count, owing to the interference on the part of the visiting catcher. Joliet players raised an awful howl. From then on they kicked, once threatening to leave the field. That came in the sixth inning when Judy Gans scored from third after Leroy Grant had singled and John Reese flied out to right. Twas a beautiful peg to the plate, aided by the wind, and the runner was called out, but the decision was reversed when Schemltz dropped the ball. Schmeltz caused another big howl in the ninth when Bingo DeMoss called the umpire's attention to the batter using a bat that was full of splinters. Tom Williams, on the other hand, caught four of the eight men who got on the sacks. The crowd was with him from the start, even some of the Joliet fans who really were fairly pulling for him, getting disgusted with the actions of their own team. - Notes of the Game - Leroy Grant was robbed of a two-base hit in the third by a wonderful catch by Swanson. The wind kept the ball in the air too long. Grant also got a round applause from the crowd in the eighth when he went to the edge of the crowd and got Ryan's high foul fly back of first. Rube and his gang boarded a rattler for St. Louis late Sunday, where they play a five game series. Saturday they move to Kansas City, playing four games. The Chicago Giants and Rogers Parks will be the attraction at Schorling's Park Sunday. The much touted Dick Lundy, crack Eastern shortstop, Dick Redding, Jesse Barber, and the Bacharach Giants of Atlantic City will open here August 8. Fully 18,000 fans crowded the park, despite the cool weather. Many were disappointed when they found Dave Malarcher was out of the game with a bad ankle and Jacobs, the star catcher of Joliet, was not in the visitor's lineup for some reason. Christobal Torrienti played third."

Chicago, IL
"Fosters, 6; Joliet, 0. - The American Giants scored another shutout yesterday at Schorling's Park, defeating Joliet, 6 to 0. Ryan twirled good ball for the losers, holding the Giants to five hits, but the breaks were against him."

July 26, 1920

St. Louis, MO
"American Giants Face Crucial Test - The Much Mooted Question of Superiority Is to be Settled. When the Windy City Gang Undergo Baptism of Fire in the West. - Rube Foster and Bingo DeMoss, will land westward with their charges, immediately after the game Sunday, opening at St. Louis, against the Giants of that city, Monday, July 26, and will fight it out for five days there. The men signed from Uncle Sam's array of athletes are expected to be at liberty to participate in the Mound City end of the battle, so the query, are the Foster crown as good on the road as they loom up on the home lot, should undergo quite an airing. Be it as it may, the circuit lot, that is those who unfortunately have falled under the ban of the Chicagoans present form - and it includes all save the Detroit Stars - will have much open space to close between themselves and the Americans for at this writing the latter have shown such a clean pair of heals to all circuit competitors that the dust has long ceased to obstruct the vision of the unfortunates and they now only entertain dreams of pennant hopes. In far off Kansas City, there is a clamor of thousands and an unmerciful wailing and gnashing of teeth for the life blood of big Rube and his baseball fighting band. The Kansas City Monarchs have the fighters and the war clubs necessary for a successful waging of battle; but pray tell us, where in the history of base ball batting, has a heavy hitting club won the big honors. The Monarchs are a heavy hitting, plodding aggregation, who pose much after the fashion of the old time prize ring battler who turns up in a sorry looking plight after a boxing lesson at the hands of our highly spirited twentieth century ring artists. At that, the Kansas City Monarchs might take the Rubenites to camp. The big scrap will start on or about July 31, and go for five days."

St. Louis, MO
* Same article, from the Chicago Defender

St. Louis, MO
"Chicago Giants Win From St. Louis Team - The Chicago Giants defeated the St. Louis Giants in the first contest of the series by a 6-to-4 score. The fielding of Lee Hill and Cristóbal Torriente was the outstanding feature of the game. Doc Dudley topped the hitters with three blows in four times at bat. The second game will be played this afternoon."

July 27, 1920

St. Louis, MO
"Chicago Victor Over St. Louis Giants, 4-1 - Brown outpitched Carr as the St. Louis Giants met defeat at the hands of Chicago, 4 to 1, yesterday afternoon. Chicago bunched two hits in the second inning with a base on balls and a hit batsman, which accounted for three runs. Chicago added another in the fifth and the Giants scored their lone marker in the ninth innning. The third game of the series will be played this afternoon."

July 28, 1920

St. Louis, MO
"Finner Pitches Local Giants to Victory, 5-0 - Finner's masterful twirling and Wallace's timely hit for two bases in the first inning with the bases full enabled the local Giants to win from Chicago, 5 to 0, yesterday afternoon. Finner held the visitors to six hits, which were scattered in as many innings, and but one man reached third base and only two touched the middle sack. Kennard lead the hitters with three hits in as many times up. The fourth game of the series will be played this afternoon."

July 29, 1920

St. Louis, MO
"St. Louis Giants Win From Chicago, 8 to 4 - The St. Louis Giants fell upon the offerings of Pitcher Jack Marshall in the sixth inning and defeated Chicago yesterday, 8 to 4. Eddie Holtz lead the hitters with three hits in three times at the bat for the visitors, he getting a two-base, a three-base hit and a home run in four trips to the pan. The final and deciding game of the series will be played this afternoon."

July 30, 1920

St. Louis, MO
"Chicago Giants Win Final from St. Louis - The Chicago Giants won the final game of their series with the St. Louis Giants yesterday, 9 to 2. Dave Brown, a left-hander, baffled the local team throughout, giving only two hits. Wayne Carr of the St. Louis Giants was knocked from the box in the fourth inning when the visitors chased over eight runs."

July 31, 1920

Kansas City, MO
"Monarchs Swamp the Mighty Rube - Teams Play to Record-Breaking Crowds. - Tight Playing and Close Results, Every Game a Bitter Struggle for Supremacy. - By Charles A. Starks. - Negro baseball is traveling like a star base runner, hitting all the bases, but making the greatest speed. Local fans were worked up highly over the very prospect of the outcome of the tournament of contests between the two wonderful machines. Speculation and enthusiasm have indeed, bordered on the fanatic. The wise birds saw in the Foster Giants a superior aggregation of players over their local scious, and it is said that this wisdom has proven quite costly, since the wise ones are known to have strongly backed up their 'knowledge' with their kale. Rube Foster, himself, probably reasoned upon the very lovical basis of the sterling record he has made in the first season of the league. The talented players, whom he controls with a never-fagging genius, naturally would lead him to think optimistically of the outcome. But there is something grander and bigger in the game itself than the mere results of the series. It is the psychological effect the organization of the league is having upon our people. Think what it means to have the bulk of the people's minds centered on one institution (Negro baseball means more than athletics to him) which employs so extensively and lucratively the brain and brawn of our people. It is a great thing to have Negroes to become daily enthusiastic about something their fellows are doing. It means more race pride, more solidarity. The same is working in old K.C. We must not tell everything we hope or expect Negro baseball to do for the race, but we know that it is doing a wonderful lot of good. - A Review of Games.

"Saturday found the Monarchs and Giants waiting for the gong to sound and they were off, the locals in the lead. But the Giants came from behind and won after trailing the Monarchs at the discouraging clip of 2 to 7 up to the first half of the 8th inning. Yes, our boys were going fine, but a comedy of costly errors turned the tide and the old masters put up the first win for the Chicagoans. Local fans were disgusted with this and it was the town talk. Currie pitched for the Monarchs, Johnson for the Giants. Score, 9 to 7 in favor of the Giants."

Kansas City, MO
"Fist Fight Livens Kansas City Game - Leroy Grant and John Donaldson Mix it, but American Giants Win Game 9 to 7. - Kansas City, Missouri, Saturday. - Coming from behind in the eighth frame, Rube Foster's American Giants copped the first of a five game series at the American Association Park, 9 to 7, as 5,000 looked on. A fist fight in the first added much to the afternoon's doings. It started when John Donaldson, Center Fielder of the home club, slid viciously into Leroy Grant at first and collided with the Chicago first sacker. Police rushed on the field and quiet was restored. "Rube" Currie hurled a splendid game for the Monarchs up to the eighth chapter, letting the visitors down with three blows and a pair of runs. In the eighth, however, the Rube Foster crew gathered their war clubs together and staged an attack which clinched the victory, five Giants denting the home plate before the smoke cleared away. The Giants jumped into the lead in the opening frame, collecting a couple of runs, but the Monarchs came back in their half of this round and put three counters across, adding another run in the second inning. The game then developed into a scoreless battle until the fifth inning, when the Monarchs added another tally. In the sixth the Monarchs counted two more runs. The Giants tied the count in the eighth, however, and stowed the game away in the ninth by gathering a pair of markers. Cristóbal Torriente, the black Babe Ruth of the Negro League, fully lived up to his reputation by spanking the apple to center for a triple in his first trip to the plate. Tom Johnson, who was on the elevation for the Giants, hurled great ball, but was handicapped by several costly boots on the part of his mates. Bartolo Portuondo and Hurley McNair had a good day with the timber, while George Carr brought the crowd to its feet in the second round by boosting the pallet over the right field wall."

August 1, 1920

Kansas City, MO
"Giants 4, Monarchs 5. Batteries - Chicago, Williams, Marshall-Dixon. - Monarchs, Rogan-Ray, Rodriguez."

Kansas City, MO
Monarchs Won in 12 Innings - A Crowd of 15,000 Saw Giants Defeated in 5 to 4 Game. - Before a crowd of fifteen thousand, the largest gathering at Association park this season, the Kansas City Monarchs evened up the series with "Rube" Foster's Chicago American Giants yesterday, capping a 12-inning melee, 5 to 4. In addition to hurling a splendid game, Wilbur Rogan, the Monarch hurling ace, won his own game in the final frame with a double, scoring Donaldson with the winning run. Tom Williams, Chicago hurler, who had not lost a game previous to the second tilt with the Monarchs hurled a splendid game for the Chicago gang, allowing the Monarchs eleven hits, while his mates collected a down off Rogan's tenders but the Kansas City flinger kept the base knocks well scattered and retired thirteen opposing batters via the strikeout route. With two down in the ninth, and the game apparently lost, the Chicago club staged a rally and succeeded in tying the count, a trio of healthy blows doing the work. In the twelfth inning Moore was wounded, Donaldson followed him and scored when Rogan followed him with a double. A wild demonstration followed, the Monarch heaver being carried from the field on the shoulders of many admirers.
In the third game of the series this afternoon ... likely will do the flinging for the Giants, while Crawford or Donaldson will be on the mound for the Monarchs."

Kansas City, MO
"Foster Loses in the 12th. - Kansas City, Missouri, Sunday. - Playing before the largest crowd that has ever witnessed a game at American Association Park here, the Foster crew demonstrated that they are the gamest set of ball players that ever trod on baseball sod. AFter coming from far behind on Saturday and winning out, they were compelled to face the same ordeal on Sunday. Rogan was master of the situation at all stages of the contest, hurling and batting in fiendish fashion. Tom Williams did not loom up as the Tom of former days. Dave Malarcher's judgement was bad on two plays and in the end they loomed up like a mountain; then Jim Brown, doing emergency first base duty, put another rock in the pathway of the Chicagoans and College Boy Tom aided. At that the Chicago crew puled up to even scores and for several frames they carried so much fight to the Westerners that is was hard to figure who would win. In the 12th frame, after John Donaldson had slammed out a drive, Bullet Rogan stepped into one of Jack Marshall's shoots, the latter replacing Tom Williams, sending over the winning run."

"Sunday - Great Game, Great Crowd. - Before the largest crowd that ever viewed a game in the history of Association Park, Rogan, the wonderful speed demon, worked his mighty arm with rigit effect. For twelve long, fought innings, he battled with the star twirler of the Foster crowd, and finally won out by knocking a triple himself in the 12th period - winning the game to the delight of the vast number of local fans. Carr, the brilliant Monarch, who covers first base, kept the Giants from scoring in the 11th. There was a runner on third and the batter hit a hot one to first base, Carr fielded it, but had to make a spectacular slide to beat the runner to first. He did, and the Giants lost the much coveted score. Christobal Torriente featured a sensational catch in the sixth session. It was a long drive, but he got it. John Donaldson scored the winning run from second off of Bullet Rogan's triple. The crowd who viewed the game was as interesting as the game itself. The multitudes found their way through the enclosures on to the grounds, making special rules necessary to govern the game. There were fully 20,000 people, if one. Of course, we don't have to make the dailys' studied estimate of the number present, we know that their conservativeness is not calculated to be so accurate as it is something else. While the estimates of the crowd may vary, but there is no question of the high quality of baseball the fans got for their money. As said, Bullet Rogan pitched a great game against an equally great pitcher, Tom Williams, and won out. Rube Foster, as a piece of maneuvering, pulled the great Ace and put in Jack Marshall in the ninth, after they had tied the score."

August 2, 1920

Kansas City, MO
"Giants 4, Monarchs 5. Batteries Marshall, Dixon, Crawford, Rodriguez, Ray."

Kansas City, MO
"Third Game to Monarchs - Marshall Was Hit Hard and the Giants Lost, 4 to 5. - The Monarchs made it two out of three in the series with the Chicago American Giants at Association park yesterday, bunching eleven safe blows off the delivery of Marshall for a 5 to 4 victory. Crawford, who did the flinging for the Monarchs was in great form and kept the visitors five hits well scattered. The Giants scored their four runs during the first two frames walks and miscues, along with a quartet of healthy bare knocks setting a pair of tallies in each stanza. After this Crawford was invincible, allowing only one additional hit, which came in the fourth round.
Marshall was hit freely by the Monarchs during the first two chapters, five safe blows being collected by the Monarchs crew, but only one run (illegilbe). In the fifth, however, the Monarchs gathered their war clubs together and made a trio of hits (illegible) for a pair of (illegible). Another counter was added in the sixth after two more clouts netted the final tally in the seventh. Currie likely will be on the mound for the Monarchs in the fourth game of the series (illegible) which will be ladies' day, while Johnson (illegible) for a turn on the firing line for the Giants."

Kanas City, MO
"Kansas City Beats Foster's Crew - Kansas City, Monday - Rube Foster's American Giants wend down in defeat today before Wilkerson's Kansas City Monarchs in a ninth inning rally."

Kansas City, MO
"Monday - Monarchs Repeat Victory. - Again the Monarchs marched home with the proverbial long end of the beacon. Sam Crawford, a seasoned Ace, performed the manly functions on the mound today for his fellow Monarchs, letting them down only with six disintegrated hit, while his own mates appropriated ten bingles for their own use. Bullet Rogan again figured in the lime light with another triple in the sixth. Otto Ray was on second - he ran in and tied the score, the Monarchs having been trailing the Giants. In the seventh Jose Mendez shot a steaming grounder down the foul line for a single - scoring Otto Ray and practically winning the game. John Donaldson made a speedy catch of Christobal Torriente's line drive in the eighth, preventing a probable score. Yes, it was a case of the Giants starting grandly and finishing poorly, and the Monarchs, this time, coming from the rear and winning. The Giants made two runs in the 1st inning and two in the second - after then the Monarchs closed the ledger, there were no more entrants."

August 3, 1920

Kansas City, MO
"Giants 5, Monarchs 6. Batteries - Chicago, Williams, Wickware-Dixon; K.C., Currie, Crawford and Ray."

Kansas City, MO
"Late Ball Games - Tuesday at Kansas City - American Giants, 4; Kansas City Monarchs, 5."

Kansas City, MO
"Tuesday - Bing! Again! - It looks like the Monarchs in the series between them and the fighting Giants. Today's win made three straight for the locals. The home boys knocked the 'stuffins' out of the wares that Mr. Thomas Williams offered on behalf of his Chicago associates. But the Monarchs have proven to be a wild west bunch, and consequently, they treated Mr. Williams to some rough and ready stuff. They batted him clean out of existence in the third inning. The Giants didn't score until the fifth, when they registered 3. They then succeeded in getting 2 more in the seventh, tying the score. The Monarhc fasted on to one in their turn and it was all for the day. Hurley McNair made a wonderful shoestring catch in the seventh off of Dixon's Texas leaguer - saving the game. Sam Crawford, who relieved Rube Currie in the seventh, struck out the 'Black Babe Ruth' (Christobal Torriente) with three on bases. Moore used more 'Vim and Vigor' (apologies to Theodore Smith) in the same inning and got a home run. Hurley McNair made his second feature catch in the eighth period and again saved the game unto the Monarchs."

Kansas City, MO
"Kansas City 5, American Giants 4. - Kansas City, Missouri, August 3. - Kansas City defeated the American Giants, 5 to 4."

August 4, 1920

Kansas City, MO
"Wednesday we lost, Rogan suffering his first defeat but at that it was a fight all the way through. Brown pitched for the Giants and was given splendid support. Giants 4, Monarchs 2."

Kansas City, MO
*Same game, different newspaper
"FIRST DEFEAT FOR ROGAN. - The Chicago Giants Bunched Hits for Victory Over Monarchs. - Wilbur Rogan, the Monarchs hurling ace, suffered his first defeat of the season yesterday when Rube Foster's Chicago American Giants bunched ten base knocks off his delivery for a 4 to 2 victory at Association park. The Monarchs gave Rogan a lead in the fourth ward, clouting the fast ones and knocks off "Lefty" Brown for a pair of fouls while the Giants collected a number off four blows in the same chapter, Rogan settled down after this round and hurled a steady game up until the eighth, when the visitors staged a rally which netted a trio of runs and clinched the fifth game of the series.
In the final game of the series this afternoon, Crawford or Donaldson will do the flinging for the Monarchs, while Johnson is slated for a turn on the elevation for the Giants."

Kansas City, MO
"Rube Foster and his men journeyed to Kansas City last week and had a lot of their chestyness taken out of them. The Kansas City Monarchs recently strengthened with several 'real up and doing players' fought them to a stand-still. Thirty thousand fans saw the five games."

August 5, 1920

Kansas City, MO
"Monarchs Won The Series - Giants Lost the Final Game Yesterday, 0 to 4. - The Monarchs made it four out of six in the series with the Chicago American Giants, gathering four runs on five safe blows in the final combat yesterday at Association Park and bagging a 4 to 0 victory. Crawford, who was on the elevation for the Monarchs, was clouted for seven bass knocks but his mates backed him up with errorless support and gathered hits off Torrienti's portsiders at crucial periods. The Mendez crew, as a whole, played a brilliant fielding game and took advantage of the Foster crew's lobbies, counting all their runs in the opening frame on a lone hit and a pair of (illegible) by the visitors.
Starting tomorrow, the Dayton club, which is rated as one of the fastest clubs in the middle West, will be here for a series of five games and the Monarchs hope to climb to first place."

August 7, 1920

Gary, IN
"Food for Fans - The Bacharach Giants, who are now finishing their series with the Detroit Stars, will invade Chicago Sunday in the second game of their series with the American Giants, the first to be played Saturday at Gary, Indiana."

Gary, IN
"Food for Fans - The Giants returned home Friday after a strenuous trip in Kansas City where they won two and lost two, the fifth game being thrown out because the umpire allowed two runs to score on a ball that had hit him. After a day's rest they journey Saturday to Gary, Indiana where they lost to the Bacharach Giants, 11 to 4. Cristóbal Torriente's home run featured the game."

August 8, 1920

Chicago, IL
"Rube Foster's American Giants Beat Bacharachs by Score 7 to 3. - Chicago - Before the largest crowd that ever attended a ball game at Schorling Park, Rube Foster's wonderful ball club defeated the invaders of New York."

Chicago, Il
"Rough Stuff! - Actions on the Baseball Field That Should be Immediately Stopped - Baseball is and always should be a clean game, and no matter how hard the game or how hotly contested, the fact that a team is in the rear should be no excuse for the ill mannerism of some of the players. The invasion of the Bacharach Giants to these parts of the country brings to light some very unpleasant things that must be nipped in the bud. The life of the game depends on the patronage that the game draws from the different classes of people, who seem willing to pay to see good sportsmanship, but who are opposed to indecent actions. Sunday's game was marred by Oliver Marcelle's capers. Tom Williams uncorked a wild pitch, and Oliver Marcell, not standing in his box, came near being hit in the head. He walked directly toward the pitcher's box with the firm intention of starting a fight. This was prevented by the quick action of the players of both teams. He should have been put out of the game then and there, but for some reason he was allowed to continue. In the third frame he again went to the plate and was booed and hissed by the crowd. With his back toward the boxes on the left side of the grand stand he proceeded to make immoral movements with part of his body that would resemby a hoochy-coochy dancer. Again he was hissed; this time the hissing came from the boxes. Fans might stand for this sort of treatment in the East, but not here, and this class of player must understand that many of Chicago's best ladies were in those boxes, thus making it possible that he draw a decent living salary. If such actions are to be displayed on the field, it is far better that the player be either barred or that the team with which he is identified be kept from appearing in Chicago. This applies to other teams as well. The Bacharachs' trouble in Detroit, where the game was stopped four times, once taking 40 minutes before it could be resumed, has left the fans of that city with the opinion that the longer they stay away the better the fans believe they do not care to see them play if the fans are laying down their hard-earned coin to see such actions as they saw Sunday."

Chicago, IL
"American Giants, 7; Bacharachs, 3. - American Giants won the opening game of the series with the Bacharachs of New York, 7 to 3, at Schorling's Park."

August 9, 1920

Chicago, IL
"Bacharachs Lose in Tenth - Monday afternoon the Bacharach Giants held a two-run lead until the sixth frame when the Giants tied the score. The score was untied in the tenth when Jelly Gardner went to first on a single and advanced on an error. Dave Malarcher's single to right sent him home with the winning run."

August 10, 1920

Chicago, IL
"American Giants, 5; Bacharachs, 1 - The American Giants won the third straight game from the Bacharachs of New York, 5 to 1, at the Giants' park Tuesday. Rube Foster's nine got away to a two-run lead in the first inning and cinched the game in the fourth by batting in three more tallies."

Chicago, IL
"Am. Giants, 6; Bacharachs, 1. - The American Giants won the second of the three game series with the Bacharachs of New York, 5 to 1, at the Giants' park. Goster's nine got away to a two run lead in the first inning and clinched the game in the fourth by batting in three more tallies."

August 14, 1920

Gary, IN
"Rube again journeys to Gary this coming Saturday, this time to play the Cuban Stars. The Cubans are booked Sunday against Rube at Schorling's Park. Tinti Molina has his team going in great shape and after a string of victories in Cincinnati they are prepared for Rube Foster's crew."

August 15, 1920

Chicago, IL
"The Cuban Stars opened against the American Giants at Schorling Park, Chicago, August 15, with an exhibition game on tap at Gary Indiana, Saturday, August 15; following them came the Kansas City Monarchs for a three day conclusion of the fierce battle that was waged here of late in the far West city; as these two teams pulled everything except Civil war in their late go, the Fosterites getting the worst of the fighting."

Chicago, IL
"Cubans Beat American Giants. - Chicago, Illinois, Special - The Cubans won the opening of the series with the American Giants, beating them 8 to 5 at Shorling's Park."

Chicago, IL
"American Giants Leading League - The standing of the clubs to date, reveals the fact that the American Giants have a comfortable lead and it will probably endure until the close of the season. The Western Circuit leader recently won four games out of six over the Bacharach Giants, the Eastern Circuit representative, so the showing up to date gives the Western Circuit Runner, an edge as to who is who in championship flag fight for the season, 1920. The percentage table shows that there is a real battle on for the runner-up position, with the A.B.C.'s and Kansas City Monarchs, spouting over who shall take it from the Detroit Stars. The Detroiters are out for a string of games on foreign territory and may return in a lower position. Immediately upon their return from the far West, they tackle the American Giants and that meeting is bound to result into circumstances that will precipitate a fierce three-handed fight for second place. Through the fact that the Monarchs and A.B.C.'s were unable to retain a hold upon their grounds at opportune times, they no doubt have been up against the toughest fighting end of the schedule oftener than the leaders. It appears that the Hoosiers have tackled the stronger clubs 33 times and the weak sisters 30; not so bad. The Monarchs have faced the strong boys 41 times and the weak ones 23. The Detroit Stars have went 50-50 all around and only for playing so many home games, really would deserve the palm. They have went an even number against both the weak and the strong; one of the stellar clubs they have not played at all, and they have not locked horns with the leaders. The American Giants have pounced upon the underdogs 32 times and have won 15 of the 21 games played against their nearest rivals, the Kansas City Monarchs and the A.B.C.'s having yet to tackle the Detroit Stars. The Hoosiers standing seems to represent the average winning percentage, of the organization, and shows it to be quite an evenly balanced circuit from a playing standpoint, but with quite a margin for improvement, especially with the Dayton Marcos and the Chicago Giants."

Chicago, IL
* Same Article, From the Chicago Defender

Chicago, IL
"Cubans Defeat American Giants - Schorling's Park, Sunday. - The Cuban Stars defeated Rube Foster's American Giants this afternoon in a game full of hitting and weird playing. Four singles mixed in with two pop fly outs were responsible for the first brace of Cuban runs. The Giants came right back with two out and scored two runs on Mothell's single to right. In the Cubans' third, with the bases full, Eufemio Abreu sent a long drive to left center. Both Judy Gans and Cristóbal Torriente started after it and the Cuban, failing to bear Judy Gans yelling that he had it, made a desperate leap. The ball hit his gloved hand, but he failed to hold it, the impact with the flying Judy Gans sending both to the ground. When they recovered and fielded the ball the batter had made third and the bases were cleaned of the three men who previously had perched on them. The Islanders added one more in the fourth and another in the fifth. Two two-base hits were responsible for the Giants' tally in the second, and is the third two singles and an infield out put the other over. The home team's final run came in the ninth, with two gone, after Jim Brown had strolled. Matías Ríos erred on Jelly Gardner's error, Dave Malarcher singled, scoring Jim Brown, but Bingo Demoss popped to Bienvenido Jiménez."

Chicago, IL
"Cubans 8, American Giants 5. - The Cubans won the opening of the series with the American Giants, 8 to 5, at Schorling's park."

August 16, 1920

Chicago, IL
"Cubans at American Giants - Schorling Park. The second game will be played today."

Chicago, IL
"American Giants Cop, 9-2. - The American Giants won a heavy hitting game from the Cubans, beating them 9 to 2. A home run by Christobal Torriente over the right field wall featured. The same teams play today."

August 17, 1920

Chicago, IL
"Cuban Giants at American Giants."

August 21, 1920

Chicago, IL
"Kansas City Here Sunday - The Kansas City Monarchs come to the 39th street grounds Saturday and Sunday for two games with the American Giants. This team played the Giants to a standstill in Kansas City and really should have taken the Sunday game here on the last appearanace but for poor head work on bases. Since the show-me boys have visited Chicago last they have added Dobie Moore, a crack shortstop from the Army."

August 22, 1920

Chicago, IL
"In Chicago last Sunday the only game played in the series, the Monarchs lost 4 to 1, with some mighty rotten umpires, although the team failed to give Sam Crawford the support."

Chicago, IL
"Giants 5, Monarchs 1. - The American Giants won another game from the Kansas City Monarchs, beating them 5 to 1, at Schorling's Park. Dave Brown and Sam Crawford each allowed five hits."

Chicago, IL
* Same article, from the Chicago Daily Tribune

Chicago, IL
"American Giants Take Kansas City's Measure - Schorling's Park, Sunday. - The American Giants had little trouble in convincing the Kansas City Monarchs that they were not their equal, the visitors going down on the short end of a 5 to 0 score. The Brown battery (no relation) worked for Rube, opposed by Sam Crawford and Vicente Rodríguez. The visitors' only run came in the seventh inning when Bullet Rogan singled, John Donaldson and George Carr fanned, Bullet Rogan pilfered second as Vicente Rodríguez took a healthy swing and missed, the Cuban hit to left, Judy Gans misjudged the ball in the sun and it landed safe, but the left fielder fumbled long enough to let Bullet Rogan, who had stopped at third, score. The home team did their scoring by playing real baseball, crossing the visitors time and again. In the first frame three infield hits eased one run across. In the third Cristóbal Torriente, the first man up, tripled. Jim Brown walked and stole second. Judy Gans rolled out Joaquín Arumís to George Carr, the Cuban scoring. Leroy Grant poked a slow one and was out on a close decision to George Carr, Jim Brown scoring. Three runs in the lead, the Giants added two more in the eighth. Clever base running of Bingo DeMoss, who stole second and third, also Dave Malarcher and Judy Gans's theft of second and Jim Brown's theft of third, a single, an infield hit and a fielder's choice doing the work. Next Sunday the Giants meet one of the hardest foes of the present season in Rogers Park, the crack semi-pro white team that makes the home lads extend themselves to win."