1910 Chicago Leland Giants

A Calendar, Including Newspaper Clippings, of the 1910 Chicago Leland Giants

1910 Chicago Leland Giants

Stories are placed in order of the date they appeared.

January 29, 1910

Denver, CO
"Popular Baseball Team's Long Tour. A great deal of interest is being taken by lovers of baseball in the Leland Giant team of Chicago, which is on a 9,000 mile tour, playing exhibition games in the middle west and in the south. On leaving the western section the team will go as far south as Palm Beach, Floriday. They are due to return to Chicago about the 15th of May."

March 19?, 1910

Houston, TX
"Leland Giants 3, Houston Black Buffaloes 2."

March 20?, 1910

Houston, TX
"Leland Giants 3, Houston Black Buffaloes 1."

March 26?, 1910

Galveston, TX
"Rained out"

March 27?, 1910

Houston, TX
"We returned to Houston and were royally entertained by the city's best citizens, the boys being fairly carried away with enthusiasm and high-class entertainment."

March 29?, 1910

Prairie View, TX
"We then journeyed to Prairie View, Texas, and played the college team (Texas A&M University) before more than one thousand students. The boys simply played with the college team and defeated them by the score of 10 to 1. Bobby Marshall hit the ball like a demon, getting three hits and a home run in this game. We were shown all the courtesy possible at the college, and the students overdid themselves in making it pleasant for the team. We left that evening in wagons to catch our train at Hempstead, riding six miles over the country roads and through streams above the hub of the wagon wheels. It was a beautiful moonlit night, and all enjoyed the novelty of the ride hugely. Our special car, a handsome Pullman sleeper, met us at this point, carrying us to Dallas, Texas, Wednesday morning."

March 30?, 1910

Dallas, TX
"In the afternoon we met the Dallas Black Giants and defeated them by the score of 5 to 2. Chappie Johnson and Walter Ball were the battery this day, and they worked like beavers instead of baseball players."

March 31?, 1910

Dallas, TX
"The following day we again played the Dallas Giants and defeated them by the score of 6 to 2. Cyclone Joe and Chappie Johnson were in the points for Lelands, and it was in this game that we got a real idea of Cyclone Joe's ability as a pitcher. His curves are of a lightning order and he is a wonderful slab artist. Harry Moore was the star hitter of this game, getting two hits and tw 2-baggers."

April 3?, 1910

New Orleans, LA
"Sunday we met the New Orleans Eagles and defeated them by a score of 10 to 0. All New Orleans was out to see the game, and for more than an hour there was almost a riot among the people to secure admission to the grounds. Steel-Arm Johnny pitched and he was invincible. The boys secured 15 hits in this game. Chappie Johnson, Bob Marshall and Joe Green hitting the ball to the fence, but were only allowed two-base hits on account of the crowd on the field. Captain Harris is playing second base and Wallace shortstop. They worked together just like a piece of oiled machinery, and Marshall is smothering the first bag greater than ever before. The team in fielding is playing an almost errorless game, and people are going wild over their superb field work."

April 4?, 1910

New Orleans, LA
"We play today (at New Orleans) then leave for Moss Point, Mississippi."

April 5?, 1910

Moss Point, MS
"Leland Giants at Moss Point, Mississippi."

April 7?, 1910

Pensacola, FL
"Leland Giants at Pensacola, Florida."

April 9, 1910

New Orleans, LA
"Leland's Chicago Giants World's Champions. - Their Famous Trip Carried Them to the Gulf of Mexico - Victory! Their Slogan. - Special to the Freeman. - New Orleans, Louisiana, April 9. - We arrived in the city of New Orleans and found beautiful weather awaiting us. the team is in good health, fine condition and winning form. Since my last letter we have visited Houston, Texas and defeated the Black Buffaloes by the score of 3 to 1. The second game went 14 innings and the Buffaloes won, with the assistance of the umpire, by the score of 3 to 2. Our trip to Galveston was successful from an entertaining point of view, but rain prevented the game, and thousands of fans were disappointed in not being able to witness Chicago's greatest aggregation of baseball players. We returned to Houston and were royally entertained by the city's best citizens, the boys being fairly carried away with enthusiasm and high-class entertainment. We then journeyed to Prairie View, Texas and played the college team before more than one thousand students. The boys simply played with the college team and defeated them by the score of 10 to 1. Bob Marshall hit the ball like a demon, getting three hits and a home run in this game. We were shows all the courtesy possible at the college, and the students overdid themselves in making it pleasant for the team. We left that evening in wagons to catch our train at Hempstead, riding six miles over the country roads and through streams above the hub of the wagon wheels. It was a beautiful moonlight night, and all enjoyed the novelty of the ride hugeley. Our special car, a handsom Pullman sleeper, met us at this point, carrying us to Dallas, Texas Wednesday morning. In the afternoon we met the Dallas Black Giants and defeated them by the score of 5 to 2. Chappie Johnson and Walter Ball were the battery this day, and they worked like beavers instead of baseball players. The following day we again played the Dallas Giants and defeated them by the score of 6 to 2. Cyclone Joe and Chappie Johnson were in the points for Lelands, and it was in this game that we got a real idea of Cyclone Joe's ability as a pitcher. His curves are of a lightning order and he is a wonderful slab artist. Harry Moore was the star hitter of this game, getting two hits and two 2-baggers. Sunday we met the New Orleans Eagles and defeated them by a score of 10 to 0. All New Orleans was out to see the game, and for more than an hour there was almost a riot among the people to secure admission to the grounds. - Steel-Arm Johnny pitched and he was invincible. The boys secured 15 hits in this game, Chappie Johnson, Bob Marshall and Joe Green hitting the ball to the fence, but were only allowed two-base hits on account of the crowd in the field. Captain Harris is playing second base and Wallace shortstop. They worked together just like a piece of oiled machinery, and Marshall is smothering the first bag greater than ever before. The team in fielding is playing an almost errorless game, and people are going wild over their superb field work. Frank Leland joined us at New Orleans and will continue with the boys the remainder of the trip. We play today and then leave for Moss Point, Mississippi, Pensacola, Florida, Mobile, Alabama, and return to New Orleans Sunday next. My next letter will tell you of the receptions that have been tendered us, and especially, the magnificent entertainment that has been provided by Mr. J.A. Brown. We are going big in the South this year, and have established a reputation that may be equaled but never excelled. Yours, R.R. Jackson."

Mobile, AL
"Leland Giants at Mobile, Alabama."

April 10?, 1910

New Orleans, LA
"...return to New Orleans Sunday next."

April 14, 1910

Chicago, IL
"Leland Given the Pennant - Chicago Giants Secure Franchis Vacated by Leland Giants. - Chicago, Illinois, April 14. - The Chicago Giants scored the first victory in the battle for the local colored patronage when Frank Leland was awarded the pennant won by the Lelands last year in the Chicago Baseball League. The question of which club to award the bunting to came up for decision Monday and the league decided to give it to the club containing a majority of the players on the team that won the pennant. Ten of last year's players have stuck with Frank Leland in the split, while Rube Foster, claims only five. The Chicago Giants' veterans are Manager Nate Harris, Walter Ball, Pat Dougherty, Rat Johnson, Mike Moore, Bobbie Winston, Charley Green, George Wright, Billy Norman and Danger Talbert. Rube Foster has himself, Jimmy Booker, Pete Hill, Clarence Payne and George Strothers as the members of the team that landed the pennant. Another point that swayed the decision was the fact that the Chicago Giants now hold the franchise vacated by the Leland Giants Club when it jumped the league for the Park Owners' Association. The league decided to hoist the pennant on May 15 at Auburn Park, the game scheduled that day being between the Chicago giants and the Logan Squares, the team that ran second in the league."

April 15, 1910

Dallas, TX
"Dallas Makes Good Showing Against Lelands - Plays Two Tight Games in Texas City. - Dallas, Texas, April 15. - Major R. R. Jackson and his fifteen world beaters stopped here Wednesday and Thursday and played the Dallas Black Giants. Although the Lelands won, they had to do some hard playing and bring out their best assortment of ball to defeat Dallas. The fans of Dallas were all smiles at the creditable showing that the home team made, after only a few days practice. Manager Walker says that Dallas will be the best team in Texas this season. The scores were 5 to 2 in the first game, and 6 to 2 in the second. The attendance was good. The Lelands left here for New Orleans."

April 16, 1910

Indianapolis, IN
"In the Field of Sport. - By Harold C. McGath. - Where to Write Ball Clubs. - Their Names and Addresses of the Managers. - The following are the names and addresses of managers of prominent colored baseball clubs in the United States: - Frank Leland's Chicago Giants - Frank C. Leland, General Manager, 2551 State Street, Chicago, Illinois."

"Championship Race to be Hot. - Teams All Over the Country Will Fight for it. - Perhaps the most talked about event in baseball that is to happen this season will be the try-out for the world's colored championship by the most prominent colored baseball clubs in the country. It is expected that the world's series will begin immediately after the closing games of the various leagues throughout the United States. There is a longer list of teams of standing which will compete for the pennant than last year, and every one of them is working hard to get into the championship ranks, so that they might be given a chance at winning the flag. So far the list is quite limited as to the teams that will compete for the supremacy mark. It includes Leland's Chicago Giants, Leland Giants, Cuban Giants, St. Louis Giants, Birmingham, Alabama Giants, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Giants, Royal Giants of Brooklyn, New York, Kansas City Kansas Giants, Kansas City, Missouri Royal Giants, Louisville Cubs, St. Paul Gophers, and Minneapolis Keystones. - Should Award a Cup. - The Freeman is of the opinion that the various managers should get together and make the contest the more interesting by appropriating a certain amount to use for prizes. A loving cup of real silver should serve as the price to be won by the club winning the world's championship. It is also slated that these games are to be played in Chicago this year, where baseball is being richly supported each year, although much talk is going the rounds concerning the idea of holding the battles in New York."

"Success of the Negro as a Ball Player. - By Andrew Rube Foster. - Manager and Captain of the Famous Chicago Leland Giants, World's Colored Champions, Penant Winners of Chicago Baseball Leauge, Season of 1909. Great strides have been made by Negro baseball players in the past few years and if he continues to receive the encouragement and hearty support of his own Kinsmen in a business way, the distance between him and the paint designated as wonderful success will be materially lessened. I don't mean to say that Negro players at this time or in the past have been unsuccessful, but I must admit that he has been quite backward when we look around and note the number of leagues that have been formed and are succeeding. We are aware of the fact that the plants and franchises of clubs and leagues are not owned or controlled by the players. The players are a part of the business and are looked upon as the most active and valuable assets of clubs and leagues; without the players there could be no leagues, and without the leagues the players would be worthy of but a small amount of consideration. Therefore, we can readily see that one cannot be successful without the other. Baseball is a business just as much so as banking or manufacturing, and in order to be successful at either, one must follow the rules, laws and principles that have long ago been laid down by men who can spell success in half a dozen different ways. - Began Wrong - The Negro started wrong, and after doing so he has been the victim of all kinds of bad advice and has been an innocent praticipant in numberous wild schemes for promoting the game. In short, I will say that the business end of the game is sadly in need of repairs, and has failed to keep up with the pace for success, that the players have set. To speak of the success of the Negro as a ball player, practically fighting single-handed, with nothing but his health and strength to back him up, is a subject which requires no delicate handling, and I do not think that any one other than a score-worn warrior, who has been in the thickness of the many fights for success, can possibly make a statement which will pass the keen eyes of the critics of the game with anything like a chance to make believe that the Negro ball player has been successful. - Advanced in Many Ways. - From a playing standpoint the Negro has been successful in various ways. A few years ago the colored player was being used as an attraction, solely through the comedy or fun that his peculiar acts upon the diamond brought out; his baseball ability was a secondary consideration, and he was... he had a bad dozen... with a vocabulary of witting sayings and comical antics. The players some years ago would write for a job; and it was only necessary for the promotor to say yes and the player would catch the first freight train headed in that direction, usually landing with no mention whatever as to contract, lasary, etc... Such is not the case at present. The colored player has in the past few years advanced from the Knight of the Rod, and his playing ability has reached such a stage of development that promoters make it their special duty to see that the physical condition of all players intended for a team is safe-guarded in the best possible way. Training trips for colored clubs a few years back would have been looked upon as a joke, but at present such trips are a certainty, ans are considered a necessity, considering the class of teams that are demanded by the public and the many requests that are coming in for an opportunity to see the representative stars among our race. The people who support the game have advanced far beyond the circus idea in baseball. So when a team takes the field, the fans soon make the fact known that they are there to see baseball, an exhibition of the national pastime and not a farce comedy. The colored player was one of the first to recognize this fact, and he began at once to show a heated interest in the fine points of the game. He has studied the game and has experimented with it from all angles until now we have players who are classed with the best in the land. This fact might be disputed upon the ground that we have had no chance to show it. But, nevertheless, such an honor has been given unto the colored lads by some of the best judges of baseball players in the country. Quite often you hear the remar: 'Too bad he is a colored man.' or 'If so and so was only a white man he would be in the big leagues.' These together with many other complimentary praises have been hurled at our boys, and such remarks have not come in the nature of a jolly. But, on the other hand, they have appeared in print over the signatures of men whose opinions are worth something and whose ideas are being studied, and are receiving consideration of thousands of lovers of the game. This show that the Negro in a measure has been wholly successful as a player. - Up to the High Standard. - Physically, mechanically or mentally speaking, the colored player has no superior. We have players at this time who can safely be classed with the highest types; and considering our resources for training and traveling in the business, I doubt if any of the big league stars could maintain the high playing standard and preserve their physical makeup to the extent that the colored player has, when you consider that he is compelled to ride in ill-ventilated cars and make long jumps, and is forced to put up with all sorts of inferior hotel accommodations, usually exhibiting on diamonds that are ... corn fields. In spite of this handicap, he usually shows up in a condition fit to give battle to the best in the land. It is the honest opinion of many baseball ment aht were the Negro surrounded by the same financial resources of his white neighbor, that he would far outclass the latter. There is nothing, mechanically speaking, which applies to the great baseball player of the country. But what the colored player has added to his reertoire, and has practiced, studied and developed the same to such an extent that he has been given credit for adding many noted improvements to certain styles of play, which are in vogue at present. Considering the fact that the Negro has no league, it might appear that he does not study baseball. His doing does no receive anything like definite consideration, by the leading baseball journals of the country. But I want to say right here that such ideas are mistaken ones, I doubt if any race playing the game studies it more closely than the colored man. He is constantly upon the alert for something new, and if such does not appear, he sets to work trying to improve upon the old ones, It is a well-known fact that when his studies upon a play are ended he has polished the same to such an extent that no rough spots are discernable. There is not a play in the game today that is foreign to the Negro player, and many plays which are receiving two-column write-ups in the daily papers are being pulled off regularly by the colored boys. These are not receiving a great amount of attention because the best we can do is to mingle with the semi-pros; and the supposition is that all such class of teams are only copying after the big fellows. - Successful Artists. - The Negro in the past few years has advanced from the barnyard class of teams up to aggregations that many big league managers would be glad to annex to their string. Aside from being endowed through Nature with a grand physique, the Negro has developed to the highest point all in the way of art that should accompany the same. We have pitchers who can well be classed as artists from the fact that they have accomplished everything that has made the white player the talk of the country. I believe that our pitchers have brought more renown to our race than any other particular position named in connection with baseball. The pitcher is the most important personage upon a ball team. That is when the game is in progress. All eyes and attention are centered upon him, and the deportment of his associates to a great extent depends materially upon his actions. If he is in the proper condition and is going good, it has a bearing upon the men behind him, which means push in the way of success. But if the reverse circumstances are true, it invatiably has an effect upon his teammates, which often results in a rank failure of the whole team. It is my honest opinion that our pitchers are the real students of the game; they are constantly studying and designing ways to deceive the other fellow. He is upon the aggressive at all times, and my opinion is that to be aggressive in baseball it brings into action more brain work than to be in a defensive position. The great studies the pitchers have made in the way of making the batter powerless before their deliveries show that such is true, and we now have the whole country trying to devise some plan by which the effectiveness of the pitcher may be lessened. Now, considering the fact, quite a few of our pitchers have shown enough in the way of merit as to be classed with the best in the country, it must mean that the player of color is a success. Following close behind our pitchers come our catchers. The man behind the bat, to a certain extent, is looked upon for being responsible for the great effectiveness of the pitcher. Playing this position, we have players, were they white, they could name their own salaries. It is the opinion of many that the great studying of his position by the pitcher is putting catchin gast into the class known as a lost art. This is alarmingly true, not only among colored players, but also in the big leagues. I doubt if there are over a half dozen top-notch catchers in the whole country. Still in the list of what few we have there are men who can safely be classed in the best class. These latter facts tend to throw much light upon the success of the Negro player from the fact that our best representative players are shining in positions which are considered the head and brains of all clubs. We have players who are good as basemen and outfielders. We also have a few who are great batsmen, but how they would stand if working regular against the highest type of pitching is a question that time only can settle. - Should Organize. - In my opinion the time is now at hand when the formation of colored leagues should receive much consideration. In fact, I believe it is absolutely necessary. We have now been in the game for a score of years, and we are no closer related to our white neighbor than when we first started; in fact, we are farther apart, as he is going ahead, forming leagues in every little hamlet; and the forming of leagues produces a barrier which we can not surmount, try as we will, unless we come to understand the heading of - Organized Baseball. - What we need is the proper financial backing and encouragement. The business end of the game has lagged along to such an extent that we now find ourselves in a dangerous predicament. We have a country full of colored ball players, well developed as to playing; but the places for giving employment to them are being promoted with such an eel-like pace, and the majority are founded upon such an uncertain business principle, that it is having a tendency to throw a dense cloud over the Negro as a promoter of baseball. The players have, through all sorts of adverse conditions, been able to bring our race to the notice of thousands who are interested in the game. Now will our business men and friends of the profession make an effort to help us to reach the coveted goal of complete success, or will they stand by and see us fall? Which shall it be? I am sincerely yours. Andrew Rube Foster, Manager Leland Giants Base Ball Club."

"John Henry Lloyd, former second baseman of the Philadelphia Giants, considered by every manager in the country to be the wonder of the twentieth century. He is a wonder in the fielding game, and a great hitter. It was his work at the bat and in the field that defeated Detroit's American League Club, Champions of the American League, and an all-star National League Club, composed of such noted players as Mordecai Brown, of the Cubs; Joss, of Cleveland; Rucker, of Brooklyn, and Comnitz, of Pittsburgh. He is referred to as a ball team in himself. This great player will play second base for the Leland Giants this season."

"Bruce Petway, formerly of Philadelphia Giants, now with the Leland Giants, is the one star backstop of the whole baseball world. He humbled the Detroit Tigers, the All-Star team of the American League, and every base runner in the country. He is the equal of any catcher in the country, and said by competent critics to be the best throwing catcher in the business.

"James Booker, star catcher, now playing first base for Leland Giants, is one of the stars of the game. The baseball public will watch eagerly Booker's career as a first baseman. He is one of the greatest catchers; and while in the prime of his career, he exchanged positions to rejuvenate the team he made famous.

"Andrew Payne, the great right fielder of the Leland Giants, is commonly called the wonder of the outfield. He is a great hitter, base runner, and one of the headiest outfielders in the game. This is his fourth season with the Leland Giants."

"J.P. Hill, Leland Giants' Center Fielder. Considered the equal, if not the superior, of any man playing baseball."

"Pryor, third baseman, and Hill, center field, of Leland Giants, Pryor is a wonderful third baseman; and Pete Hill, the great center fielder of Lelands, was born the idol of outfielders, a great base runner and a wonderful hitter; a fast man with a deadly arm to men who would score on a hit."

"Fred Hutchinson, shortstop of the Leland Giants, is one of the most promising shortstops in the country. His great arm and fast fielding have been a revelation to thousands of fans all winter at Palm Beach. He will make a wonderful player, and is at present considered the equal of any shortstop in the country."

"Frank Wickware, The Pitching Wonder of the Leland Giants. - Frank Wickware, formerly of Dallas, Texas Giants, now pitching for the Leland Giants, is today one of the greatest pitchers in the country. He is only 22 years of age, and posesses more speed than any other man now pitching. His coolness and delivery humbled the Royal Giants time and time again."

"Frank Duncan, The Great Left Fielder of the Leland Giants. - Frank Duncan, formerly of the Philadelphia Giants, considered to be the greatest left-fielder in the business, is a great hitter, base runner and has a great arm. He is an improvement over all the left fielders in the game. The Leland Giants gained a great deal when they secured his services."

Indianapolis, IN
"Season 1910 to be Banner - Formation of Associations in Different Parts of the Country Indicates that Turning Point Has Been Reached. - By David Wyatt. - Thousands of lovers of baseball will welcome the sound of the gong which will call to the field hundreds of baseball players. In the past when the keen eyes of the fans were critically scanning the sporting pages of newspapers their attention was mostly confined to the doings of the big leagues, with a casual glance now and then at the minors. The semi-pros have come to the front with such an amount of rapidity here of late, until now their operations attract about as much attention as the big fellows. In the early months of the baseball season but little information as a rule can be gleaned from the colored man in baseball. This is caused through a condition which to a certain extent cannot be remedied. The business of colored clubs is carried on in such a way that they cannot give out definite news until about the latter part of May. In fact, Memorial Day is considered about the general moving day for colored clubs. - Off with the Bunch. - This year no less than a half-dozen colored clubs will start right off the reel with the big ones. Some are even going so far as to traverse the same routes of the big fellows for training trips. The Leland Giants have planned an itinerary of about nine thousand miles, while the Chicago Giants at this writing are on the second lap of a journey of about four thousand miles. The Kansas City Royal Giants have mapped out a tour which will take them over a territory heretofore new to the colored man in baseball. Quite a number of clubs have decided that they will not make training trips, but nevertheless they are busy signing up material and making preparations for an early start. Reports from all sections of the country have been coming in and all convey fresh information of gigantic plans under consideration for the promotion of baseball. If the many plans which have been hatched are brought to a healthy life we take it to mean that the New Year of 1910 will be the banner year in Negro baseball. - Great Interest Shown. - We are glad to note the great interest that has been aroused through the articles that have appeared in the Freeman from time to time. Too much credit cannot be given to this able journal for coming to the front in the interest of the great national game and the Negro who is struggling under adverse conditions for recognition. The Freeman can well be classed as the savior of the Negro in a professional which is an honor to the country and one in which thousands of American, as well as foreign, citizens are deeply interested. There is no profession which is a greater leveler of the races and there are none which will tend to mold a higher standard of moral character than our national game. To cite the great popularity and tendency towards good that baseball has aroused we have only to note what an ardent fan our own President Taft is. While in Chicago last summer, Mr. Taft cancelled numerous invitations for the purpose of attending a baseball contest. Mr. Taft has a brother who is financially interested in two of the most valuable baseball plants in the country. The same gentleman recently attended a semi-pro game for the purpose of watching the Negro in baseball. Upon this occasion he was introduced to and congratulated the great Rube Foster upon his skill as a pitcher. This is only one of the many compliments that have been showered upon the Negro as a player. Upon numberous occasions the colored lubs of the country have been banqueted and entertained by leading citizens of all races in different parts of the country. The class of baseball that the Negro is putting up at this time is very good evidence that he is giving his moral and physical welfare the proper amount of attention. He has advanced far beyond that brand in which comedy plays the leading part, and has now attracted the attention of persons in all walks of life, who appreciate intelligence. These same persons have thrown down the gauntlet to all agitation of the time-worn color line and have openly declared the Negro baseball player the equal of the best and worthy of the same loyal consideration which has been shown the white players. I mention with much feeling an instance of where a Negro baseball club was practically removed from the supposedly remote position of ordinary, rough, uncouth athletes to one which was surrounded with such an amount of friendship, sociability and loyalty that it made an impression upon every member of the club, which, in my opinion, they will never forget. Some years ago, while playing in the town of Rensselaer, Indiana, the mayor of that place invited the whole club to his residence, where we were treated in a manner which would have made a king feel proud. We were assured by the mayor that it was a matter of friendship and appreciation of our gentlemanly actions and intelligent ball playing which was displayed under the most trying circumstances as this section of Indiana seemed a little at outs with the man of dark skin. We were given the freedom of all the parlors, banquet and dance halls. We sat in the corridors of the palatial residence and smoked and we also took part in a number of the dances. After receiving showers of congratulations upon our ability as players, we all left, feeling that we had played a brilliant part in helping the white race to understand us. I have been in a position which has caused me to come in contact with people from all sections of this country, and quite a number from foreign countries, and I have yet to find a person who has not heard of or witnessed the playing of the famous Leland Giants. In fact, a mention of these stalwart athletes always paves the way for an agreeable conversation with most any person, which is another instance of the popularity of baseball and the interest that is being displayed over the progress of the man of color in the game. The American Negro is not alone in this late awakening to find what a grand and popular game baseball is. Reports are coming in of the formation of leagues in South America, Japan, China and Honolulu. Our colored soldiers played a leading role in introducting the game in the Phillippine Islands and these islanders are progressing rapidly. In conversation with Mr. George Ade, the playwright, who has traveled through all those countries, he stated that the Japs and Chinese are playing fine baseball. They are grand fielders, but are somewhat shy in hitting. This is probably doe to their smallness of stature. Mr. Ade has witnessed games in all parts of the world. He is an ardent fan and a close student of the game, therefore an opinion from him that the Negro has progressed wonderfully and is now playing a game the equal of the best white clubs should inspire us on to greater efforts, and now considering the manner in which Negroes in all sections are planning to further the cause, it is quite and assuring fact that we will reach the coveted goal, and that quite soon. The preliminary process before the final opening is now on in full bloom, and through foreign reports we learn that three or four of our leading clubs have secured lineups for the season which, according to the views of their respective managers, are the strongest yet to represent the names of the different clubs. Rube Foster has a bunch under his wind which on paper looks to be the class of the country. The Chicago Giants also have a team of youngsters with a sprinklin of old heads which should make things hum in the City League race in Chicago. The Philadelphia Giants, Brooklyn Royal Giants and other clubs will have the usual quota of fine talent. Foremost amongst the new organizations in the West who will try for the big honors of baseball stands the St. Louis Giants, chaperoned by a quartet of young men who have established a name for themselves as promoters and business men. We look to hear favorable reports from the St. Louis crowd this season. The Kansas City Royal Giants are not to be denied this season, as they have set about to have a team which will make the best in the business open their eyes when they encounter them. The Leland Giants are now showing in the South, as well as the Chicago Giants. These Clubs up to date have had somewhat the best of the other clubs in the fact that they have comfortable homes to return to and should a Southern tour prove a financial failure their losses can easily be recouperated, as there are thousands of fans anxiously awaiting to get a peep at these husky athletes. It is quite unfortunate that neighter of these big clubs has seen fit to carry along a baseball war correspondent. This is a most important feature of training trips and the best medium for advertising not only for the club itself, but all sections of the country through which they pass. We are hearing more of baseball through such of this writing and the big leaguers are exhibiting their abilities and putting towns upon the baseball map which heretofore had looked upon the game as a huge joke. The same can be said of the two colored clubs which are traveling through a territory which has sent forth material equal to the best in the country, still had no one been in a position to report upon their ability such stars as Rube Foster, Munson, Lloyd, and other would have been lost to the Negro profession. We should speedily eliminate the prevailing methods of selfishness in baseball and we should awake to the realization of the fact that the more towns and players that we can put upon the map, the better and more substantial our financial resources become. Negro baseball has been at a stagnation for years and for no other reason than that the game has been confined to a select few. We, at this time, demand that all be given a chance, and if a city or town is worthy of financial consideration it should be worthy of having their business placed in print. But so long as our big clubs insist upon going into a place and grabbing all the money in sight, having with no other version of the story of games save their own, just that long good baseball centers will remain in the unknown class, likewise good players. All managers who are up to date and know the game appreciate the value of advertising, and such men have at all times a friendly and a welcome hand ready to extend to the news gatherer. Why our colored managers insist upon maintaining such an amount of silence and secrecy concerning their operations and plans is part of baseball that years of experiance has taught me against the wisdowm of. The Leland Giants missed a fine opportunity for playing the Pittsburgs at Hot Springs through the things I have mentioned. The writer had been in touch with their manager through letters, but had no idea that they were in the vicinity of Hot Springs until they wired for dates just four days ahead, which was too short a time. We cannot afford to miss such valuable opportunities to give the white man chance to understand us simply through lack of business foresight. If we intend to do anything in baseball we must not be backward and dull in getting our plans before the people. Months in advance we are put in touch with the doings of big league clubs, and by the free use of the daily press their plans are heralded far and wide. These are the methods that bring success. By the time this letter reaches the eyes of the poeple we will have some definite reports on the Negro in a real contest. We sincerely hope that all clubs will have the largest and most prosperous season that has ever befallen the lot of the Negro in baseball. - Dave Wyatt, the Well Known Baseball Writer and Star Correspondent of the Freeman."

April 19, 1910

New Orleans, LA
"Chicago Giants Beat New Orleans - New Orleans, Louisiana, April 19. - Frank Leland's Chicago Giants defeated the New Orleans Eagles here yesterday by the score of 6 to 0."

April 23, 1910

Chicago, IL
"The Leland Giants Baseball Club managed by Andrew Rube Foster, is still defeating the teams of the South and will return home the early part of May."

"Frank C. Leland, Frank Lelands Chicago Giants Baseball Association, R. R. Jackson, A.H. Garrett and Chicago City League Restrained from Using the Name Leland Giants. - On Wednesday morning last, the Leland Giants Baseball and Amusement Association, through its attorney and secretary, B.F. Moseley, won a signal victory in Judge Baldwin's Court, when the following order was entered: State of Illinois County of Cook, ss. Circuit Court of Cook County, Lelang Giants Baseball and Amusement Association, vs. Frank Leland's Chicago Giants Baseball Association, Frank Leland etal. - The motion of the complainant coming on to be heard upon the amended bill of complaint, and the answer of all the defendants, except the Chicago City League thereto, and it appearing from the answer of said defendants that they and each of them have in and by their said answer disclaimed any right or intention to use the name Leland Giants as the name of their Baseball Clubs or of advertising or being known to the public or anyone by the name Leland Giants and said defendants avering and asserting in their answer that the legal and incorporated name of the defendant Baseball Club is the Frank Lelands, Chicago Giants Baseball Club, and it is usually known by the name of Chicago Giants and that Frank C. Leland is the manager of said Chicago Giants, and it being the desire of all the parties hereto that there should be no confusion as to the name or names of the two different baseball clubs. It is herefore ordered that hereafter, no person or persons acting for the defendants, shall in any wise use the name Leland Giants as the name of the defendant club or feature the name Leland in connection there with, etc. This disposes of the bill filed to restrain the use of the words Leland Giants by others than the Leland Giants Baseball and Amusment Association and assures the public that there is but one Leland Giants Baseball team and that Andrew Foster is the Captain and Manager of that team, which will play ball at its new park, 69th and Halsted Street, beginning May 15."

Indianapolis, IN
"Thinks Leland Giants Will Win. - In regard to the championship series between the leading colored teams of the world, I think that the Leland Giants team at present standing is the strongest colored team ever gotten together from our race. Why I say so: Take from the catcher to right field. There is Catcher Petway, who is in a class by himself. There are also others on the team in a class by themselves as colored ball players. Take that man Lloyd, Pete Hill, Home-Run Johnson, Rube Foster. These men I class as the greatest of colored ball players. With the rest they have with them I can't see why they should not win the baseball honors. - Albert Toney, Shortstop Kansas City Royal Giants."

Moss Point, MS
"Moss Point Giants Battle with Lelands. - Moss Point, Mississippi, April 28. - The Moss Point Giants played the Chicago Leland Giants here Saturday and the Lelands won by a score of 7 to 1. The Moss Point Giants have a first-class club this season."

April 24, 1910

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
"Chicago Giants are Little Too Many. - Special to the Freeman: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, April 24. - The Chicago Leland Giants, the greatest baseball team in the world, defeated the Oklahoma City Monarchs Sunday, April 24, by a score of 12 to 0. Wickware of the Leland Giants held the Monarchs at his mercy and did not allow a man to reach third base during the game. Batteries - For the Monarchs: Boones and Bolden, for the Leland Giants: Wickware and Petway."

April 25, 1910

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
"Monarchs Lose Both Games with Chicago. - Special to the Freeman. - Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, April 25. - The Chicago Leland Giants defeated the Oklahoma City Monarchs Monday, April 25, by a score of 3 to 1. The Monarchs played a better game than they did Sunday. They also hit Daugherty, but still they were not able to win the game. Batteries - For the Leland Giants: Daugherty and Petway; for the Monarchs: Webb and Bolden."

April 26, 1910

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
"Chicago Giants Take One From Monarchs. - Monarchs Win from the Oklahoma Indians. - Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, April 26. - On Tuesday, April 26, the Chicago Leland Giants defeated the Oklahoma City Monarchs in the last game of the series by a score of 6 to 1. Batteries for the Chicago Leland Giants: Foster and Petway; for the Monarchs: Skinner and Bolden."

April 27, 1910

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
"All of the Chicago Leland Gaints were out to witness both games between the Oklahoma Indians and Oklahoma City Monarchs."

April 28, 1910

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
"All of the Chicago Leland Gaints were out to witness both games between the Oklahoma Indians and Oklahoma City Monarchs."

April 30, 1910

Indianapolis, IN
"The Leland Gaints' Trip. - A full account of the Leland Giants' spring practice trip will be published in these columns on the return of the champions to Chicago to play the opening game of the Chicago City League."

"Reports from the East bring the information that the big clubs down that way have put the ban on Rube Foster and his band of ball tossers. Rube snatched all the best talent from the Eastern Clubs in order to fill up the gaps left vacant in the Leland Giants by the advent of the now famous Chicago Giants. The successful raiding of clubs in the East by the Westerners has left the big colored club down there is such a weakened condition that it is feared that they will probe easy game for the clubs they will encounter out this way. This state of affairs is the proper thing to help Negro baseball. The search of the Easterners, as well as the numerous Western clubs, for playing material will give employment to dozens of players heretofore unknown to the profession. There is a demand throughout all sections of the country for good players and the magnates are offering good salaries. This alone speaks volumes in favor of the success of the Negro in the game."

"Court Says Frank Leland Must Find New Name. - Rube Foster's Team Can Only Use the Name Leland Giants. - By Staff Correspondent. - Chicago, Illinois, April 28. - On Wednesday morning, April 20, the Leland Giants Baseball and Ausement Association, through the attorney and secretary, B.F. Mosely, won a signal victory in Judge Baldwin's court when the following order was entered: State of Illinois, county of Cook, ss.: Circuit Court of Cook county. Leland Giants Baseball and Amusement Association vs. Frank Leland's Chicago Giants Baseball Association, Frank Leland et al. The motion of the complainant coming on to be heard upon the amended bill of complaint, and the answer of all the defendants, except the Chicago City Leauge thereto, and it appearing from the answer of said defendants that they and each of them have, in and by their said answer, disclaimed any right or intention to use the name Leland Giants as the name of their baseball club or of advertising or being known to the public or anyone by the name Leland Giants, and said defendants averring and asserting in their answer that the legal and incorporated name of the defendant baseball club is the Frank Leland's Chicago Giants Baseball Club, and it is usually known by the name of Chicago Giants, and that Frank C. Leland is the manager of said Chicago Giants, and it being the desire of all the parties hereto that there should be no confusion as to the name or names of the two different baseball clubs. It is therefore ordered that hereafter no person or persons acting for the defendants shall in any wise use the name Leland Giants as the name of the defendant club or feature the name Leland in connection therewith, etc. This disposes of the bill filed to restrain the use of the words Leland Giants by others than the Leland Giants Baseball and Amusement Association and assures the public that there is but one Leland Giants baseball team, and that Andrew Foster is the captain and manager of that team, which will play ball at its new park, 69th and Halsted Streets, beginning May 15."

May 14, 1910

Chicago, IL
"Weather Man Plays Havoc With Baseball Magnates. - Big Opening of Colored Clubs Put off Until May 15. - By David Wyatt. - Preparations for a grand opening had been perfected, and the Chicago Giants, who had just returned from a successful Southwestern tour, were slated for a flag-raising stunt. A bunch of about 1,800 of the faithful assembled at Auburn Park to take part in the ceremony and to get a peep at the new bunch of athletes that Frank Leland has imported for pennant winning purposes. Cyclone Joe Williams, who is credited with being responsible for the recent spring blizzards, as well as many victories for the Giants, was slated to pitch with the only Chappie Johnson as receiver general. Aside from the flag raising announcement, this battery alone drew out the crowd, others showing a willingness to go, but thought better of the fireside rather than face the prospects of pneumonia and large doctor bills. - Giants a Fast Bunch. - The Giants presented a formidable appearance, and all the men looked every inch a player of class; the boys, under the leadership of Nate Harris, put up a snappy practice, and soon brought to light the fact that Harris had infused into them that same energy, ginger and do-or-die disposition which has made him the talk of the fans ever since the advent of the Lelang Giants. Taylor, the new man at third, displayed much form, being possessed of a good throwing arm and showing the coolness of a veteran. Youth will probably give him the call over the veteran Talbert, who, by the way, was displayin ginger equal to a Texas pony. Wallace, who is filling in at short during the illness of George Wright, is a fixture, displaying much form and high-class knowledge of the fine points of the game. Marshall, who gave the Chicago fans a sample of his ability last fall, is at this time putting up such an article of fast playing that the fans almost failed to recognize him. Chappie Johnson, with his new pupil, had on such a head of steam that he was popping off every minute. Chappie is some catcher, and the best receiver in the business to show a young pitcher the way to the head of the class. Green was full of pep, as usual, and pulled off a few catches which indicated that his ankle, which was broken last fall, is as solid as ever. Winston, another accident victim, was showing his old-time speed. Bobby beat out an infield hit in the heavy going. Mike Moore, the old reliable, was a little indisposed, but was showing the great form as of old. Great interest was centered in Cyclone Williams. Cyclone is a long, lanky chap, with a world of speed and some fancy curves. When the hot summer sun begins to shine, the speed that Cyclone is able to turn loose should be regulated by law, according to Joe Green. Pettus, the new catcher from the wild and wooly West, shows that he has put in lots of time polishing off the rough spots; he seems inclined to the fancy big bitt stunts that has made Chappie famous. The writer thinks that he will do better to stick to the old rough-and-ready act, for the reason that Johnson's stuff is hard to copy and is a natural trait with the latter. Artie Ball got a chance to show in the outfield, and displayed the same nimbleness which has caused him to be classed as a high-class outfielder, as well as a pitcher amongst the best. Billy Norman claims that he will be in such form that his doings will be classed with the best. John Taylor, better known as Steel Arm Taylor, came in for a lot of attention from curious ones. One fan who formerly lived in Birmingham claimed that Taylor worked around the big steel mills in the Southern city, and through such he absorbed such an amount of the metal into his system that the wear and tear of a nine-inning scuffle is only a mild workout. It requires about eighteen innings to see Steel Arm at his best. In the game against the Red Sox here, the Giants in every way lived up to the telegraphic reports of their high-class playing. The boys played circles around their first City League opponents, and according to the way they ran bases and punched the horsehide, we can see visions of another pennant. Popular with the Fans. The team received a hearty welcome, and nine fans out of every ten are with the club. The boys received congratulations and accepted the glad hand from hundreds of admirers, every one of whom has a deep anxiety within their breasts for the complete success of the club. We are glad to note the cosmopolitan spirit that is being displayed by the patrons of baseball here. The reception tendered the new men, who, by the way, have come to fill the positions formerly held by men supposedly invincible, shows that the people who attend the games want all who can play baseball to have a chance. The ancient idea that only a select few who have held the boards for years are fit for a great team has been thrown down, and the fast bunch that Mr. Leland has collected will cause such vague reasoning to be trampled under the feet of thousands who will meander out to Auburn Park to watch the Chicago Giants. - Big Opening on 15th. - The big doings in colored baseball circles will take place upon May 15. At this time the two big clubs, the real class of the baseball profession, will draw lots, which, by the way, will be a fine chance to feel the pulse of the South Side fans as to which club will be in popular favor with the bugs. Both clubs have the strongest attractions that can be offered in that city. The Chicago Giants will entertain Callahan's Logan Squares, while the Leland Giants will have the Gunthers as opponents, both of the above named clubs being popular with the colored people, and it has been a much argues question for years as to which of the two are most admired by the colored fans of the South. The test as to the popularity of the four leading clubs of the city has brought about a state of affairs which has aroused much interest and should prove a nice thing as far as the box office end of the affair is concerned. - Both Clubs Claim Pennant. - According to a ruling of the City League officials, the pennant flag for the winning club has been awarded to the Chicago Giants. The club will unful the flag upon this date, and has made extensive preparations for the usual ceremony and flag-raising act. The Leland Giants claim the pennant upon their own accord, and are backed up by William Haisen, of the Gunthers, who pulled out of the City League with the Leland Giants. The Leland Giants claim that they have been presented with the pennant flag by a former City League official, and while the great opening flag-raising stunt is going on at Auburn Park, the exact ceremony will be celebrated at Normal Park. The two parks are seperated by many blocks of space, both located upon the South Side. Auburn Park is located at Seventy-ninth street and Wentworth Avenue, while Normal Park (home of Leland Giants) is located at Sixty-ninth and Halsted. The latter aprk is located one mile farther West than the home of the Chicago Giants, and one mile nearer to the city. This latter seeming advantage is offest by the distance West and the fact that patrons will have to use slow cross-line cars to reach their destination. Auburn Park has a decided advantage in the fact taht the park is reached direct without change of cars on State street lines. According to news reports, both teams have simply toyed with their opponents on the training tour; both clubs have a formidable array of talent, and we are all more than anxious to see both clubs succeed in their effort, which, though brought about through difficulties, still we think will prove a great thing for the game, and we hope the result to be one of ultimate satisfaction to all."

May 15, 1910

Chicago, IL
"Pennant Raising Day at Chicago. - Sunday, May 15, will be pennant-raising day at Chicago, Illinois, and the Chicago Giants will hoist the flag on their diamonds, afterwards playing a game with Jimmy Callahan's Logan Squares. It will be remembered that the pennant was awarded Frank Leland's club, as his team contained the majority of the members of the team that won last year's pennant in the Chicago League."

Chicago, IL
"Gala Day in Baseball at Chicago - (By Cary B. Lewis.) - Special to the Freeman. - Chicago, Illinois, May 18. - If any fan doubts that Rube Foster has not one of the best teams in the country, he should have been at their first game on last Sunday at Normal Park, 69th and Halstead streets. One of the largest crowds that has seen a ball game here this season was present to welcome the boys home. Speech making, bands of music, presentation of the flag and many other forms of amusement was indulged in for over an hour previous to the calling of the game. Hundreds of Rube Foster's friends assembled around the captain and talked of his recent Southern trip, and Rube was very jubilant over his success. He declared to the Freeman correspondent that never before in his life was he treated with greater hospitality and courtesy. He said that he had one of the best teams in the United States, and that as the summer rolls by, he would prove this statement. The contest was between Rube Foster's Leland Giants and the Gunthers. The score was 5 to 1, in favor of the Giants. Costly errors behind Fred Bergmann were responsible for the loss of the game by Manager Nielsen, Meddy dropping a fly in the fourth inning and Reitz booting another in the sixth that first tied the game and then the Giants started a batting rally that won. On a platform in the southern part of the park, Secretary Mosely delivered a stirring speech. He spoke of the progress of baseball and how the Amerian people were taking to the sport. He eulogized the team and presented the flag to Rube. Mr. Foster was cheered until the fans were almost hoarse. The K. of P. Military Band played music during the game under the direction of A.T. Stewart. The first two innings, neither team was able to score. In the third, Gunthers got on a jump and brought in one. In the fourth, Duncan reached first. Lynch missed a high fly and Duncan went to second on an overthrow. Hiss sacrificed Duncan to third. Home Run Johnson hit a terrific single through third and Duncan scored. In the fifth, Petway made his famous throw to Lloyd at second, with first and second occupied and got his man clean. Pryor got on first by Bergman's fumble of his roller. Pryor after sprinting to first took cramps in his legs and Hutchinson did the running. In the sixth, Hutton got to first on balls. Schall's hit sent him to second. Heckmyers hit a fly which Pete Hill trapped and completed a double play and retired the side. The Gunthers could hardly understand it. It was at this point that Hill showed great head work. In the sixth the Giants brought in four scores. Duncan got to base on balls. Hill poked one over the infield, and on a wild throw, Duncan scored and Hill kept on to third. Johnson got to first on balls and stole second. Lloyd slammed one to left field and went to second and Hill scored, Johnson resting on third. Payne hit to right field; Johnson scored on a delayed steal; Payne went to second while Lloyd scored and Payne stole third. It was in this inning that the Giants showed great head work and superior knowledge of baseball playing of a professional nature. Nothing was done during the remainder of the game, and the score ended 5 to 1, with colors flying, in favor of the Giants.

"Notes of the Game. - Rube Foster did not play in the second game. He sat on the bench and watched his men with an eagle eye. - Rube Foster's Leland Giants pennant flag is blood red with maroon colors. The wind was just high enough for it to furl throughout the game. - Umpire Human gave fair decisions. He was firm and unmovable at all times. At no time did he receive a jolly from the crowds due to a raw decision. - Hiss sent a fly away over the fence and it was a pity that he had to strike out. But Hill is usually a safe hitter. He has a keen eye and is a credit to the team. - The infield was on the jump all the time, and the outfield did excellent work. Bergman was an easy mark for the Giants to hit, and on several occasions, the white skinned semi-pros. - Bearguard Mosely, secretary of the team was as busy as a bee. Right after making a brilliant speech he was seen in the box looking after the financial ends of the game. - As the band began to play at the close of the game, the Gunthers packed up slowly and passed out, suffering the second defeat at the hands of Rube Foster's peerless champions. - Nine-tenths of the fans were white people and the other tenth were colored fans. Many ladies were at the game seated in boxes and in the comfortable and commodious grand stand. - Whenever the Gunthers raised a fly, it was just the same as falling in a barrel of tar. As the game neared the end, Wickware got better and better. Like Kentucky Whiskey, he seems to improve with age. - Foster's Giants look like ball players, and more than that, they play like the best ones. They were dawned in their new suits, and one fair damsel was heard to say, 'They certainly look good to me.' - Duncan, Petway, and Lloyd are from the Philadelphia Giants. Home Run Johnson from the Royal Giants, Brooklyn, and Pryor and Hutchinson from the Chicago Unions. My, said one of the fans, what a powerful combination. - In the first game between the Giants and the Nipperskins, the Giants won with a score of 5 to 2. Foster pitched with Petway behind the bat. It was another game in which showed the cleverness of the Giants and their brilliancy as players. - M. Haynes was there with his usual fund of information. He is one of the best informed players in Chicago. Haynes says that he don't expect that he will play this season, although a number of teams are anxious to use him. - Elwood Knox, managing editor of the Indianapolis Freeman, was a guest of Rube Foster at the first game. Mr. Knox spent the entire morning hobnobbing with the boys. Each player expressed their appreciation of The Freeman's sporting page."

May 21, 1910

Chicago, IL
"Leland Giants Challenges Any Ball Club in World. - Rube Foster's Leland Giants challenges any ball club in the world for a series of games to decide the championship, for a side bet of $500 to $3,000, or for 75 per cent to winner and 25 per cent to loser, or for all the gate receipts. The Lelands will play on the above terms any place in the United States. I offer this inducement to all the so-called champions; I want the public to be convinced as to who is really the champion. I will deposit $500 with the Freeman any time the challenge is accepted. That we will live up to our agreement, I want the readers of the Freeman to be convinced once and for all that all the clubs that are advertising how great they are, are only looking for advertising and are afraid to play us. We are open to play any place or any club. Now watch them all crawl in their hole. If our challenge is not accepted this year, we will claim the undisputed right to championship of the world. - Andrew Rube Foster, Manager Leland Giants."

New York, NY
"Base Stealing. - By Eddie Williams, New York City. - There is no thrill quite so delightful as the one which goes through you after seeing a base stolen. It is a pleasure for me to see a two-bagger hit and more especially agreeable to me when I see a home-run hit, but give me the sensation of seeing stealing a base once in a while. The art of stealing a base is the most spectacular in baseball. It is no great sight to see a splendid batter like MacCellan, Earle, Lloyd, Duncan, Gordon, P. Hill, Wallace, Hutchinson, Grant, Johnson, James and many other great hitters strike out. There is nothing that will especially send a ran to his feet with his heart in his mouth, neither is a well-placed hit so very exhilirating. Of course everybody likes batting and lots of it, but it is no imposing sight. But take a well-stolen base, one in which the runner disappears in a cloud of dust and shirls around the base with one spike firmly landed in to keep him from slipping away. That brings out the noise that an enthusiast has stored in him. There are many star base stealers among our profession. But there is plenty of base stealing during a season among the boys, but few players make it stand out like a masterpiece. Anyone can steal a few during a season by lumbering down the line with all sails set, for many a throw goes wild. The science or what might be called the essence of stealing is different. Harris, Winston, Wallace and Green of the Chicago Leland Giants; Payne, P. Hill, Duncan and Petway of Foster's Lelands; Earle, Monroe, Bradley and Bowman of the Royal Giants; Wilson, Barber, James and Polis of the Philadelphia Giants all have it. These maginicent base runners are finished artists, yet each one has his own style, very much so in the case of Harris, Hill, Monroe, Earle, Gordon and Petway. Take Harrison and Hill for example. They are the restless type, always in motion. They jump back and forth trying to draw a throw from the pitcher. They bend low and then they seem to spring into the air and finally dash for the next base. They are such graceful runners that it is difficult to tell just how fast they are running, but their records for stolen bases is eloquent enough. Duncan and Bowman in action make few motions, but hover over the line until they are good and ready; then they tear down so fast with such an impetus that it take a lot of nerve for a player to tag them. Lloyd is another such a base runner. Ray Wilson gives no indication of speed or race, but he possesses these two qualities in a surprising degree, and his stealing is magnificent. His strong point, however, is avoiding the man with the ball. He has the slide which carries him outside the base and around, his spikes clinging to the base. This leaves about a foot to be touched as far as gracefulness is concerned. Earle is one of the foxiest ball players I ever saw. He has the speed of a human deer. Harris, P. Hill, Ducan, Coles and Bowman are about the nerviewst base runners I have ever seen."

May 22, 1910

Chicago, IL
"Rube Foster's Day. - And the Leland Giants Win - Stars of Cuba the Victim. - By Cary B. Lewis. - Special to the Freeman. - Chicago, Illinois, May 23. - It was Rube Foster's day at Normal Park on last Sunday, when he defeated the Stars of Cuba by a score of 7 to 1. He was given magnificent support by the whole team, and it was clockwork on the part of the Giants. An enormous crowd was present, due to the fact that at this park was the star attraction of the day. It was a hard task to get tickets to the game, as there was such a great rush for seats. Mendez, the champion pitcher, played at third and Chacon at shortstop, and these two gamesters threw the game away. A fumble and three throws of an insane character told the tale. Those things gave the Giants the best of the game and the contest ended with a score of 7 to 1 in favor of Mr. Foster and his fast squad. It was undoubtedly the largest crowd that had been seen at the park for some time, as fans were lined up along each side of the fence, and this magnificent gathering went wild when Hill drove one over the fence, making a home run. Foster was in the best of spirits. He pitched with old time vigor and strength, striking out four men. Pereda of the Stars of Cuba sent five men to the bench. Most of the Cubans are young, there being four men to our knowledge that were members of the Cuban Stars last season. Valdez, left fielder, made a sensational steal in the fifth inning, but this did not help them, for the only time they scored was in the first inning. In the fourth inning the Giants crossed the home plate five times, and after that the heavens became cloudy, a sprinkle of rain, then a good shower, but the fans for the most part remained fully fifteen minutes and Umpire McWaters called the game to play ball and the other two innings were fast and snappy, but neither side scored."

"Baseball Gossip. - Petway, Booker and Strauthers are catchers that can't be duplicated. - Banker Binga, Riley, Vance, Anderson were at the game in a Red Devil Auto. - Rube says, read the offer in the Freeman. He says he has $500 for all clubs that think they can win. - Jap Payne, the Giants' clever fielder, uses his head. He has broken up many a game in favor of his team - In Foster, Wickware and Daughtery the Leland Giants have three of the greatest pitching staff in the country. - Booker on first base is playing the game of his life. He is certainly some sacker for anything that comes his way. - Rube says that he would not give his team for any in the country. He is certainly proud of his boys, and he don't fail to show it. - Jimmy Callahan says that Petway has one of the greatest arms of any backstop in the business. When Petway is catching they all hug the sacks. - Pryor and Hutchinson are playing in big league form. Mighty good for the first season. Later on more will be expected of these two coming stars. - Duncan in the outfield can whip the ball in with great speed. Duncan is a great fielder. He is well liked by the fans. No push pin ball with Duncan. - The big leaguers who went to Cuba say that Lloyd could play on any team and make good. This is good news to Lloyd. Give praise where it is due. - Home Run Johnson is showing that he is a high-class ball player. Old Father Time has no effect on him. He not only looks well, but plays the game well. - When it comes to beating out bunts and using his head, Captain Hill is in the class with Ty Cobb, says M. Haynes, who knows the game of baseball from A to Z. - Rube Foster enjoys the reputation of being a gentlemanly ball player. He has thousands of friends, and they never tire of speaking kidly of the great pitcher and captain. - Talk has already begun about the series between the two teams. If the fans want to see them play, my what a stream of dollars will be put up to see them. Will the managers let the chance slip? We will wait and see. - A ball player may have the finest style, but unless he is in form he is no good to a team. Good condition of the player is what the fans want, and this is what the colored teams are giving thus far. We hope they will keep it up. - When it comes to business Manager Mosely is a J.P. Morgan. He is right up to snuff in all things pertaining to the business of the club. He was very proud of the large attendance on last Sunday. There was not a vacant seat to be found, even the 'Standing Room Only' sign was almost necessary. - Phil E. (Daddy) Reid, the owner of the St. Paul Colored Gophers, was at the game Sunday and was an interested spectator. He was tendered a reserved seat. Four of his men of 1909 are now with the Leland Giants. They are: Marshall, Taylor, Wallace, and Steel Arm Johnny Taylor. Mr. Reid congratulated Mr. Foster on the very large crowd and the appearance of his park. - The Lelands had pay day the past week and all the boys had money. That's what makes them play ball. It makes the old correspondent write: in fact, it makes us all do our best. Get busy, everybody, for thousands of dollars will be spent seeing baseball, and those who do the work deserve to get theirs. Players as well as managers don't mind getting all they can."

"Foster's Boys Win Over Nippersinks - Score, 5 to 2. - Foster's Leland Giants played their first game of the season at 11 o'clock a.m. Sunday, at Normal Park. Nippersinks were their opponents and they lost at a score of 5 to 2. Foster pitched a great game."

May 29, 1910

Chicago, IL
"The Giants will play the Normals Sunday."

Chicago, IL
"Lelands 14; Normals 1. - On last Sunday the Leland Giants defeated the Normals by a score of 14 to 1. It was a one-sided contest, the Lelands showing that they outclassed the white boys. Daugherty's superb hitting, followed by terrific hitting of other players won the game. Petway pitched and the Caucasians could not touch his fast balls and comet curves."

"Rube has won thirty-three straight games. He must be a Mason. Go on, Rube, you nmay become a Shriner in baseballdom."

"Johnson, Booker and Payne got two-base hits on last Sunday. These three are the safe men on the team. Pryor comes through the field with a three-base hit. The Lelands' batting average is going skyward. - Large crowds of white people are still attending the Leland Giants team at 69th and Halstead streets. Large numbers are seen each Sunday at the Chicago Giants' games."

May 31, 1910

Chicago, IL
"Leland Giants 14; Gunthers 8. - Rube Foster is still king of ball tossers. He won two games on Decoration Day and won on the previous day. Decoration Day they played the Gunthers. It was a double-header. The first game was very cleverly played, while the second was mere pastime, yet the fans seemed much pleased with the exhibition. Fred Bergman's long homerun hit over the back fence saved Neisen's men from a shutout in the early game, while Lloyd starred in a one-handed catch. Rube was satisfied to win the first game, so Wickware tossed the ball for the second series. In the eighth inning the Giants, stung by a decision on a passed ball, pounded out four runs off Jie Bradshaw and then the Gunthers landed three against them, Shall sliding into the home plate for a fourth run that Umpire Frye called out. The Leland Giants showed greater ability than their white opponents. They played better ball and they went on record as winning their thirty-third straight victory."

"Petway and Hutcherson got two-base hits. When it comes to hitting the Lelands are just some pumpkins. A double play (Lloyd to Johnson to Booker) was one of the features of the second game on Decoration Day. - Francis, Pierce, and Richardson are in the two-base hit class during the past week."

June 4, 1910

Chicago, IL
"Shut Out by Leland Giants. - The Leland Giants defeated Chicago Heights at Chicago Heights, last Saturday, by a score of 5 to 0. Both Dougherty and Thoney pitched good ball."

June 5, 1910

Chicago, IL
"The Leland Giants will play the Artesians on next Sunday. A large crowd is expected to be present. Mosley and Foster claim that they are very optimistic with reference to the outlook of their team."

Chicago, IL
"Leland Giants Win - Wickware Pitches No-Hit Game. - It was a no-hit day for colored pitchers in the city of Chicago on last Sunday. The Leland Giants had an easy match for the Athletics at Sixty-ninth and Wentworth streets. Rube sat on the bench, but Wickware struck out fourteen men. The Giants fielded perfectly, not an error being made, while only two men reached bases. Nobody reached second base and only one ball reached second base. It was a great game for the Giants. Their record has now gone skyward. Foster and Beauregard Mosely are jubilant over their team's success."

June 11, 1910

Chicago, IL
"Leland Giants' Baseball Booklet. - The Leland Giants' Baseball and Amusement Association of Chicago has issued its 1910 booklet. The publication contains a history of the organization and descriptions of the various enterprises conducted under the board's management, among which are Our Park, Chateau do la Plaisance and the Hippodrome. The history of the players of the baseball team is an important feature of the publication, together with rules for umpires and players. The list of the clubs in the Park Owners' Association and the names of the members of the various clubs are a valuable part of the booklet. The publication as a whole is useful and interesting. Published from home office, 6221 S. Halsted Street, Chicago, Illinois."

June 12, 1910

Chicago, IL
"Baseball Gossip in Chicago. - The Lelands play the Senecas next Sunday. - Captain Pete Hill is said to be the fastest outfielder in the game. - Only one ball hit to the outer field off Wickware, and Captain Hill captured it. - Booker and Petway got 24 of the Leland's 27 putouts. That's sure some record. - Big crowds are finding their way every Sunday to Leland's Park, Sixty-eighth and Halstead streets. - The Leland Giants have won thirty-five straight games. They will have to get the Cubs to break the ice. - Wickware, of the Foster team, is one of the best finds seen in this part of the country for many a day. - In Hill, Duncan, and Payne, the Leland Giants have an outer garden that even the White Sox would feel proud of. - Every man on the Leland Giants team got a hit except Dad Johnson, certainly hard on any pitcher they go up against. - Fans around the town are beginning to talk of the fall series between the Chicago Giants and the Leland Giants. Wait, boys; it's coming. - No-hit games are all the rage in Chicago. Taylor and Wickware have hung up their record. They expect to duplicate the same the next time they go in the box. - The Leland Giants and the Chicago Giants in the White Sox new park, about the close of the season. Just save us one good seat in the press stand, for we will sure be on hand."

Chicago, IL
"Daugherty Pitches Good Game. - Leland Giants Win - Take Two Games Sunday. - The Leland Giants played two games last Sunday. The first was played against the Lawndales at the Lawndale Park, the Giants winning by a score of 14 to 2. They took the second by a score of 10 to 4. The second game was played at 69th and Halstead streets. Daugherty pitched a fine game with Petway at home plate. Daugherty struck out six men and the Giants made twelve hits."

Chicago, IL
"Lelands Defeated at Last. - Gunthers Break Winning Streak of Colored Players. - The Leland Giants' celebrated winning streak of thirty-five straight victories was broken last Sunday by the Gunthers, who downed the colored men, 3 to 1, at Gunther Park. The north side win was a clean cut hitting victory over Rube Foster, who pitched and was hit safely nine times. Earl Rugar twirled for the Gunthers and allowed six hits. The features of the game were the hitting of Hutton and Dicke and a catch by Duncan, the latter playing loosely afterwards and costing runs."

June 18, 1910

Chicago, IL
"Mr. Jos McLane was in the city last week, the guest of Rube Foster. He is from Jacksonville, Florida. He also makes his home part of the time in New York. He is one of the leading headwaiters in the country, having charge of the finest hotel in the South. He saw both the colored teams play, and it was his opinion that Rube Foster had the best colored team in the country. Mr. McLane has had much experience with teams, professionals of both races coming to Jacksonville for winter quarters. The Leland Giants were there last season and were highly entertained by him. Mr. Foster declares that he will go again next season. While here, Mr. McLane was shown Chicago by Mr. Foster."

"The Leland Giants will leave soon for Louisville, West Baden, and St. Louis, Missouri. This will be their first trip away since their Southern tour. Fans at these places are anxious to see Rube and his team, and it is expected that they will have the biggest crowds that have ever witnessed a ball game in that section."

"The Leland Giants are still winning. Only lost one game in thirty-seven. Everybody gives it to them as having one of the best teams in the country. Foster and Wickware are pitching some great ball."

"Secretary Bearguard Mosely still maintains that he has the best team in the country. He points to the record of the Leland Giants and says that tells the tale."

June 19, 1910

West Baden, IN
"The Leland Giants are not at home Sunday, but will be home hereafter, as follows: June 26, Dixon Browns of Dixon, Illinois, July 3rd Stars of Cuba, July 10th; Gunthers, and July 17th. Kansas City Giants. The Lelands leave Sunday night for West Baden where they play on the 20th, 21st and 22nd, Louisville Kentucky 23rd and 24th, returning Saturday, the 25th when they play the Roseland Eclipse, on the 30th they play at Sheboygan, Wisconsin, and also on July 1st. These games will get the Lelands in their proper condition and will enable them to play better ball than they have yet played this season. Those wishing to see scientific ball playing can't afford to miss their home exhibition. They play the Artesians tomorrow at Artesian Park, while the Normals and Mutuals play at their home park."

Chcago, IL
"Leland Giants Win a Second Victory. - Defeat the Cuban Stars - Foster's Team Still 'the Candy.' - A large crowd was present on last Sunday at Artisian Park to witness the battle between the Leland Giants and the Stars of Cuba. It was another one of those up and down games, the the Lelands getting the best of it. Foster's team proved the best hitters, Mendez suffering from an attack of malaria, pitched only three innings and Perea was put in his place. Hill and Pryor carried off the honors with the stick, they making three base hits, while Lloyd, Johnson and Booker made double plays. Dougherty struck out seven men. This makes about forty games that the Leland Giants have played and only lost one game. Secretary Beauregard Mosely stated to the Freeman correspondent that he has $500 for any team in the country that can beat the Leland Giants four games out of seven, the purse to go to a benevolent institution."

June 20, 1910

West Baden, IN
"The Lelands leave Sunday night for West Baden where they play on the 20th, 21st and 22nd."

West Baden, IN
"Between the Giants. - Leland Giants Win from Sprudels - The Same Score, 4 to 2, for Both Days. - Special to the Freeman. - The West Baden Sprudels and the famous Leland Giants crossed bats June 20, 22 and 23. The Sprudels showed a record of winning 36 out of 48 games, and also a record of not losing a game for 20 straight. The Lelands had not lost but two games out of the last 38 games. Therefore it made the series very interesting, as the Sprudels had beaten the Louisville Cubs, Memphis Tigers, Cuban Giants, Evansville Athletics and Vincennes of the Kitty League, not allowing either team to win a game. The Sprudels had also beaten French Lick and other semi-professionals who are claiming the championship of the Middle West, as the Memphis Tigers. The Sprudels are not claiming any championship, but have proved what they are by beating every team played, barring the Lelands. And our old master, Rube Foster, said the series of games he won from the Sprudels was certainly the hardest he had won this season. The first game was fast and looked in favor of the Sprudels time and again. Pete Hill and Hutchinson, it can be well said, won the game for the Giants by knocking the ball over the centerfield fence for homers right in the time of need. Sam Wiley, the big third baseman for the Sprudels, also lifted one of Foster's drops over centerfield fence, which the Baden fans greeted with Thank You! Clark did the twirling for the Sprudels and had the Giants guessing all through the contest. Foster, the old reliable, was in for the Giants and gained quite a lot of favor from the fans with his funny sayings and underhand ball."

June 21, 1910

West Baden, IN
"The Lelands leave Sunday night for West Baden where they play on the 20th, 21st and 22nd."

West Baden, IN
"Second Game. - The second game was something of a pitchers' battle and went thirteen innings in favor of the Giants. It was one of the hardest contests seen on the Sprudels' diamond since Foster and his men were in Baden a year previous, when twelve innings were played without either side scoring. It was when Dougherty made his hit with Rube and also when Rube outbid the Sprudels for the big left-hander. The Sprudels had one in just as good and showed Foster that there were other left-handers that could puzzle them as well as Dougherty. Ben Taylor was the contestant, and only liked one thing to have beaten the champions, and that was Pierce, the old 1909 catcher. Taylor held the champions all through the contest as though they were the Plutos, and would have won his game only for a costly error by the Sprudels favorite sticker, Eugene Moore. In the thirteenth inning, with two men on base. Strother went in to bat for Pryor and knocked a line drive straight to Moore, who misjudged it and allowed it to go over his head, scoring the two winning runs. Wickware was in for the Lelands and acknowledged he had not pitched as hard this season. Petway showed some class in all three games and is undoubtedly the best colored catcher in the business."

June 22, 1910

West Baden, IN
"The Lelands leave Sunday night for West Baden where they play on the 20th, 21st and 22nd."

June 23, 1910

Louisville, KY
"The Lelands... will play... Louisville, Kentucky, 23rd and 24th."

Sterling, IL
"Thursday of this week the Leland Giants will go to Sterling, Illinois for a two days' trip. They will return and play the Kansas City Giants on Next Sunday."

Louisville, KY
"The Leland Giants. - Clean the Louisville Cubs Two Fine Games, 7 to 3 and 10 to 4. - Special to the Freeman. - Louisville, Kentucky. The Leland Giants are robbers. They took everything in sight. Uncle Rube made a clean sweep of the series with the Cubs by winning both games. Our boys would have made a better showing if three of our men had not been on the sick list. - Martin, West, Emory and Woods being out of the game."

June 24, 1910

Louisville, KY
"The Lelands... will play... Louisville, Kentucky, 23rd and 24th."

Louisville, KY
"Notes. - The knockers from Center and Walnut realized their fondest dreams on June 23 and 24. Rube spread the salve on Nutter an inch thick just before he left. Sure Uncle Rube won both games. If he had lost - oh my! - That was the prettiest week-day crowd of Thursday. The fair sex was out in a goodly number. The Lelands are a good drawing card. - Wallace is really a great second baseman. His work compares favorably with any player in the country. - Watson is still playing big league ball on third and batting in good form. West pitched good ball and with proper support things would have been different. - Say, Rube, you got yours. - Home Run Johnson is quite a favorite with the crowd. His witty sayings, good playing and gentlemanly conduct won him many friends. That's all right, Grif. There'll come a time some day. It is up to the management of the Louisville Cubs if they want to sustain the past reputation of their club. Several good players have left the team; in fact, the Cubs are not the team of 1909. It is now up to the management to give the fans what they are willing to pay for, and that is a winning team."

June 25, 1910

Chicago, IL?
"The Lelands... returning Saturday, the 25th when they play the Roseland Eclipse..."

Chicago, IL
"Leland Giants 7, Roseland Eclipse 3. - Roseland Eclipse met defeat at the hands of the Leland Giants Saturday, the colored boys winning by the score of 7 to 3, at Roseland. The Giants won the game by hitting Kelly hard, while Dougherty twirled well. Both clubs fielded in fine style."

June 26, 1910

Dixon, IL
"June 26, (Leland Giants vs) Dixon Browns of Dixon, Illinois."

Chicago, IL
"The best game of baseball of the season at the Leland Giants Baseball Park, 69th and Halstead Street, Kansas City Giants vs. Leland Gaints, Sunday, June 26th. Game called at 3:30p.m. Come early and get a good seat. Battery Frank Wickware and Bruce Petway for the Leland Giants, Bill Lindsay and William Tenney for Kansas City Giants."

Chicago, IL
"Foster and Petway will be the batteries for next Sunday against he Kansas City Giants."

Chicago, IL
"Rube Foster and his fast team are at Louisville and French Lick Springs this week. They will return on Sunday to play the Kansas City Giants at Normal Park. The Leland Giants crowd last Sunday was estimated at 3,500. Mosely and Foster were much pleased with such a large following."

Chicago, IL
"Leland Giants Win. - The Leland Giants won their game from the Kansas City Giants on last Sunday. There was a large crowd present. Wickware pitched a splendid game, striking out seven men. The visitors were able to score only one run, and that was in the seventh inning, while the Lelands started off with a score, making one in the second, two in the sixth and four in the eighth. It was almost a complete wallop and the Kansans were baffled all through the game. At one time it looked as though it would be a shutout."

June 30, 1910

Sheboygan, WI
"The Lelands... on the 30th they play at Sheboygan, Wisconsin, and also on July 1."

Sheboygan, WI
"The Leland Giants will leave on Thursday for Sheboygan, Wisconsin to play two games. - The mighty Rube and Bearguard Mosely are all smiles over the success of their teams. - Has anyone notied Duncan's huge medal? It covers his whole breast. - The critics report that Foster has one of the best teams ever organized. Hill and Duncan pulled off several big league catches in the field on last Sunday. - Bill Lindsay is a good pitcher. All he needs is a good team behind him. He had all the sluggers on the team bending after him. - The Leland Giants report a delightful trip to French Lick, West Baden and Louisville. Foster and his men were given quite an ovation. Foster has hosts of admirers all over the country. The team is expected to go East later on. - Lloyd, Hill, Duncan and Johnson used all kinds of headwork in the game on last Sunday. - The fans that attended the game of the Chicago Giants on last Sunday were very much pleased with the new park. The crowd was immense and a cool breeze added much pleasure ot the occasion. As usual, there was a large number in the boxes, which are commodious, with plenty of chairs, clean and dusted."

July 1, 1910

Sheboygan, WI
"The Lelands... on the 30th they play at Sheboygan, Wisconsin, and also on July 1."

July 3, 1910

Chicago, IL?
"July 3rd (Leland Giants vs) Stars of Cuba."

Chicago, IL
"Lelands Fall in Second Defeat. - The Leland Giants met their second defeat of the season at Normal Park last Sunday, when the Stars of Cuba beat them by the score of 15 to 7."

July 4, 1910

Chicago, IL
"Monday was a lucky day for the Chicago Negro teams. All sportdom had a run for its money. While the Chicago Giants were gaining a lap that placed them in second place in the City League, the Leland Giants won two games from the Gunthers, the first 9 to 3, the second 4 to 3. The game in the morning was a walkaway for Rube Foster's boys, but it took rather fierce fighting to annex the second battle. Ruger pitched a splendid game for the Gunthers, but in the ninth inning a double by Pete Hill, followed by singles by Johnson, Booker and Pryor, scored three runs."

July 10, 1910

Chicago, IL?
"July 10, (Leland Giants vs) Gunthers."

Whiting, IN
"First Game for the Grays - Whiting, Indiana, July 7. - The first game of ball to be played by the Whiting Grays this season, on Saturday afternoon, will take place this week at their Forsythe Park, when the Grays will play the Leland Giants of Chicago. The Saturday games have been arranged for the benefit of those who do not wish to attend games on Sunday, and they, with all the other lovers of this national sport, will now be able to see good games in Whiting without going to Chicago. The Leland Giants are a fine team, and have the record of having won thirty-six straight games. They have been secured at a considerable expense and if the fans show the appreciation by turning out as well on Saturday as they do on Sundays, Manager Zimmerman will continue these games. As an inducement in getting all the clergymen interested, it has been decided that any clergyman who attends the Saturday games will be admitted free of charge. The game will begin the same as on Sundays, at 3 p.m."

Chicago, IL
"Lelands Clinch Game in First. - Score Three Runs Against Gunthers, Winning Easily, 5 to 1. - The first inning sewed the game up for the Leland Giants, the colored boys trimming the Gunthers 5 to 1 at Normal Park. In the opening round Petway was passed, Hill bunted safe and Johnson singled, scoring Petway. Floyd's sacrifice put men on second and thir and Booker doubled, cleaning the bases. Rugar allowed only two hits after the opening round. An error by Floyd let Schall score with the Gunther's only run. Lynch starred with two running catches."

Chicago, IL
"The first and only colored ball club in the Union to become Champions in a white league. Base Ball played scientifically and gentlemanly every Sunday at 3:30p.m., before the best people. Game Sunday, July 10, Leland Giants vs Gunthers."

July 16, 1910

Chicago, IL
"Lelands Take Hitting Match From Gunthers. - Colored Players Rout Rugar and Hammer Bergmann, Winning One-Sided Contest by the Score of 9 to 3. - The Leland Giants won a hard hitting contest from the Gunthers, Saturday, at Gunther Park, by the score of 9 to 3. The colored men put the game away early, putting seven runs over the plate in the first five innings, when they hit Rugar hard. Bergmann took Rugar's place in the fifth, but he was unable to stop the attack of the Giants. The North Siders also hit hard, collecting eleven hits off Foster."

July 17, 1910

Chicago, IL
"July 17, (Leland Giants vs) Kansas City Giants."

Chicago, IL
"Lelands Whip Sprudels. - Role up Score of 9 to 0 - Great Crowd Present. - Otis Burnett, of West Baden, Indiana, came to the city Sunday with the West Baden Sprudels, to play against the Leland Giants. Much to the credit of the visitors, they put up a fine game. The first six innings were as finely played as any team the champions have gone up against. The Sprudels were in excellent trim, and their good playing elicited a great deal of rooting from the fans. Taylor, the pitcher for the Sprudels, could not deliver the goods, while Dougherty of the Lelands, was there. Taylor struck out two men, while Dougherty struck out nine men. Every man on the Leland Giants team made a hit except Pryor, and Hill and Payne made three base hits. One of the largest crowds of the season attended the game."

"The Leland Giants defeated the Felix Colts Sunday morning, 5 to 1, at Ogden's Grove. The Score: Leland Giants 5, Felix Colts 1."

July 23, 1910

Chicago, IL
"On Monday of this week the Chicago Baseball League passed a rule barring games between its members and all visiting colored ball clubs from now on, the rule being made to include the Cuban clubs that have been playing around the circuit the past two years. The rule will work very badly against the Stars of Cuba, who figured on playing on the Chicago League Circuit after the Cuban Stars left the city. This action means that the Chicago Leaguers will not play visiting colored teams any more in the future."

July 24, 1910

St. Paul, MN
"Special Train From Chicago. - A train bearing two special Pullmans will arrive in St. Paul via Northwestern, bearing Maj. R.R. Jackson and F.C. Leland with his Chicago Leland Giants, also their relatives and friends who will visit St. Paul for the World's Championship Games at Lexington Park."

"The St. Paul Colored Gophers - World's Colored Champions - Who will play the Leland Chicago Giants, at Lexington Park, July 24th, 25th, 26th, 27th and 28th, for the World's Colored Championship."

"Perhaps the most important series in base ball ever staged in the independent ranks around the twin cities will be the coming battle between the Colored Gophers and Leland Chicago Giants at Lexington Park July 24th, 25th, 26th, 27th and 28th, for the world's Colored Championship. These are undoubtedly the two greatest negro teams in the country and the article of Baseball as put up by them is said to equal that of the Big League teams. Last season during their series at the downtown park in which the Colored Gophers captured the coveted title of winning 3 out of 5 games. Newspaper experts and fans of the twin cities declared that the games in question contituted the fastest and brainiest exhibition of the national games ever seen in St. Paul with the exception of Little "Wallace" Steel and Johnny Taylor, the celebrated eccentric pitcher, the champion Colored Gophers maintain about the same lineup as last season on their present long tour of the Dakotas and Minnesota. Consuming about 6 weeks time they have swept everything before them, proving conclusively that they have the material for another championship team in Lefty Pangburn, no hit Johnny Davis, and Louis Johnson, the Ex-university of Illinois star the Colored Gophers can boast of one of the best pitching staffs to be found among negro clubs. Bobby Marshall, our own Bobby, at first, Bowman 2nd, McDougal shortstop, and Captain Jimmy Taylor at 3rd, make up the infield while Wesley, Barton and Binga take care of the outer garden, to date this famous organization has won a total of 62 out of 68 games played with a no hit no run game to the credit of Johnny Davis against the Hope, North Dakota semi-pro team on June 30th at Hope, North Dakota. After the series with the Chicago Giants the Gophers will make a tour of the following cities: Buxton, Iowa, Kansas City and St. Louis, Missouri; Louisville, West Baden, Indianapolis, and Chicago. Perhaps the largest crowd that ever saw an independent series in St. Paul will greet these two great teams at Lexington Park, Sunday, July 24th."

St. Paul, MN
"St. Paul Colored Gophers vs Leland's Chicago Giants - at Lexington Park - July 24-25-26-27-28 - What will unquestionably prove to be the most important event staged in semi-professional baseball this season, to fans and lovers of the great national game, in and around the Twin Cities will be the series between the champion Colored Gophers of St. Paul and Frank Leland's famous Chicago Giants, for the world's championship. The games will be played at Lexington Park, starting Sunday July 24, with four days to follow, July 25-26-27-28. Last season when these teams met the Gophers after five fierce struggles, captured three out of the five games played, in what critics and newspaper experts declared was an exhibition of some of the fastest and brainiest playing of the national game ever seen in St. Paul. With a majority of last season's lineup and several new stars added, the Gophers still maintain one of the fastest semi-professional clubs in the country, and the boys to promise to make a gallant stand to retain their title. Out of 68 games played thus far this season, 62 have been victories. With Lefty Pangburn, Johnny Davis and Louis Johnson, the Gophers can boast of one of the best pitching staffs in the country. Bobby Marshall, McDougal, Bowman and Taylor make up the infield; Barton, Binga, and Wesley the outfield. Special street car service will be furnished with preparations for handling one of the largest crowds ever assembled at Lexington Park on the opening day, Sunday July 24. The Chicago Giants is a member of the Chicago City League and has in its lineup: Rat Johnson, LIttle Wallace, and Steel Arm Johnny Taylor, prominent players in last season's champion Gopher team. Lovers of baseball that is baseball don't want to miss these games."

Chicago, IL
"Leland Giants Baseball Park - 69th and Halsted Streets, Chicago, Illinois - Stars of Cuba, Sunday 24th, at Home."