1910 Kansas City Giants

A Calendar, Including Newspaper Clippings, of the 1910 Kansas City Giants

1910 Kansas City Giants

Stories are placed in order of the date they appeared.

April 16, 1910

Indianapolis, IN
"Championship Race to be Hot. - Teams All Over the Country Will Fight for it. - Perhaps the most talked about event in baseball that is to happen this season will be the try-out for the world's colored championship by the most prominent colored baseball clubs in the country. It is expected that the world's series will begin immediately after the closing games of the various leagues throughout the United States. There is a longer list of teams of standing which will compete for the pennant than last year, and every one of them is working hard to get into the championship ranks, so that they might be given a chance at winning the flag. So far the list is quite limited as to the teams that will compete for the supremacy mark. It includes Leland's Chicago Giants, Leland Giants, Cuban Giants, St. Louis Giants, Birmingham, Alabama Giants, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Giants, Royal Giants of Brooklyn, New York, Kansas City Kansas Giants, Kansas City, Missouri Royal Giants, Louisville Cubs, St. Paul Gophers, and Minneapolis Keystones. - Should Award a Cup. - The Freeman is of the opinion that the various managers should get together and make the contest the more interesting by appropriating a certain amount to use for prizes. A loving cup of real silver should serve as the price to be won by the club winning the world's championship. It is also slated that these games are to be played in Chicago this year, where baseball is being richly supported each year, although much talk is going the rounds concerning the idea of holding the battles in New York."

April 23, 1910

Indianapolis, IN
"Where to Write Ball Clubs. - Their Names and Addresses of the Mangers. - Kansas City, Kansas Giants - Tobe Smith, 430 Washington Boulevard, Kansas City, Kansas."

May 14, 1910

Kansas City, KS
"Kansas Giants Will Not Stand by Contract. - Sporting Editor The Freeman: I wish to state to the public that I had a contract with Tobe Smith, manager of the Kansas City, Kansas Giants, to play a series of four games, namely May 14, 15, 16 and 17. We played the first game, and then it began to rain. I stayed with my men until my contract was out. When I demanded my money Mr. Smith absolutely refused to pay on account of not having good weather. Now, this is the kind of men that are hurting the game, and I thought it was my duty to let the public know what they can expect from a contract with this individual. He is the most unreliable man I ever did business with. I also had a contract with the Royal Giants of Kansas City, Missouri for the following week. The weather was very bad and the gate receipts fell far below the guarantee, but the management paid us in full without a word. I simply make the statement to set the public right in regard to the baseball proposition in Kansas City. Col. Edward F. Mitchell, Manager and Owner Minneapolis Keystones."

May 28, 1910

Kansas City, KS
"Kansas City, Kansas Giants Base Ball Club. - Record breakers for 1909, viz: 147 games played, 128 won (54 consecutively) Would like to hear from first class teams. We have our own park, located one block from car line. Average Sunday attendance for 1901, 1,723. Address all communications to Tobe Smith, 430 Washington Boulevard, Kansas City, Kansas."

June 4, 1910

Kansas City, MO
"Kansas City Royal Giants. - Special to the Freeman. - A six-day league has been formed, which will be composed of six teams, as follows: All Stars of the Inter City League, Atchison, St. Joseph, Soldiers' Home of Leavenworth, Kansas City Royal Giants and Kansas City, Kansas Giants. A.S. Prather will manage the All Stars and will use Smith Park. It is the intention of the league to play two games a week at each of the three ball parks in the city, a club traveling to St. Joseph, Atchison and Leavenworth, which will keep the teams playing, and a pennant awarded the winner."

Kansas City, MO
"Kansas City Royal Giants and Kansas City, Kansas Giants Take One Game Each. - Special to the Freeman. - The Kansas City Royal Giants and the Kansas City, Kansas Giants opened fire on each other last Sunday at Shelly Park, in Kansas City, Missouri before a record breaking crowd. There were little ones and big ones, some were sitting and some were standing, in every available spot, and the echoes from the cheers of every star play can only be equaled and not excelled. The game itself was a hummer from the word go to the finish. But for the misfortunes of Messrs. Buckly and Lee who did the twirling for the Royals, in misdirecting their throws to Meckling, who occupied the initial sack, the well-behaved crowd might have brought their lunch and made themselves at home, while the two clubs might have been prevented from their strenuous battle only by darkness. It seemed that Mr. Buckley thought that Meckling had grown about three feet taller, and when Moss hit a big bound to him he heaved what should have been an easy out up against the right field fence. Moss went to second and scored before the inning was over. It was in the sixth inning after Mr. Lee had relieved Buckley that he became somewhat unbalanced and after picking up an easy one, threw wild to first. This allowed another run. Again, in the eighth, with one gone, Lee made another bad peg; this time to the second bag, allowing Kansas and their third run. The one Bill Lindsay was dishing them up to the plate somewhat above the average for the Kansas boys. It was a good hot day and it seemed that Wild Bill turned on more steam in the ninth session, consequently the nine large goose eggs were all the Royals could claim that really belonged to them. Monday it was different. The Royals, beaten the day before, but not disgraced nor discouraged, under the leadership of Captain Jack Johnson, they went into the game at Riverside Park, Kansas City, Kansas, with all of the determination, vim and aggressiveness in the world. Deacon Taylor was on the mound for Kansas, while the Royals used Happy Sparks, who, by the way, had the Kansas boys at his mercy throughout. At the end of the ninth the score stood 5 to 0 in favor of the Kansas City Royals."

June 11, 1910

Kansas City, MO
"The Royal Giants will meet the Kansas City, Kansas team in a series of three games, Saturday and Monday, June 11 and 13, at Shelley Park, Sunday, June 12, at Riverside park, Kansas City, Kansas. The series will be the big doings, as both teams have a shut-out to their credit. The fans want to know who is who."

Kansas City, MO
"Kansas City, Kansas Giants and Kansas City, Missouri Royal Giants in Championship Contest. - The Kansas Giants have held the intercity championship for the past four years. Manager Jack Johnson of the Royal Giants, after leaving the employment of Mr. Smith, owner of the Kansas Giants, organized the Royal Giants of Missouri and styles them the champions of the Middle West. So in order to set eh general public and fans right managers of the two teams have decided to play a series of five games. The following is the outcome of the series:"

First Game:
Kansas City Giants 3, Royal Giants 0."

June 12, 1910

Kansas City, KS
"Kansas City Royal Giants at Kansas City, Kansas team at Riverside Park, Kansas City, Kansas."

Kansas City, KS
"Second Game: Royal Giants 5, Kansas City Giants 0."

June 13, 1910

Kansas City, MO
"Kansas City Royal Giants vs Kansas City, Kansas Giants at Shelley Park, Kansas City, Missouri."

Kansas City, MO
"Third Game: Kansas City Giants 7, Royal Giants 2."

June 13, 1910

Chicago, IL
"Kansas City Giants Victors. - The Kansas City Giants got revenge on the Gunthers last Sunday morning for their previous defeat by blanking the North Siders, 2 to 0, at Gunther Park. Bill Lindsay, twirling for the visitors was the whole show."

June 14, 1910

Kansas City, MO
"Fourth Game: Kansas City Giants 6, Royal Giants 2."

June 15, 1910

Kansas City, MO
"Fifth Game: The game started out fine and was being hotly contested by both teams. Pitcher Childs of the Royals and Chamberlain of Kansas were both in great form and the day was fine; the fans were wild with excitement. The Kansas Giants scored 1 in the fourth and the score remained the same until the last half of the eighth, the Royals at bat. Childs hit for two bases; Toney grounded out; Williams, center fielder, hit for two bases, scoring Childs and tying the score. Johnson hit out the right field foul line by 20 inches, scoring Williams. Umpire Sturman called it a fair ball and Captain Foster called his men off the field and refused to play the game out, as the umpire had been very raw against the Kansas City Giants. Umpire Struman then declared the game 9 to 0 in favor of the Royal Giants. So the Kansas City Giants will still wave their banner as champions of the inter-city and will enter the world's contest to be held in Chicago or New York City for the championship of the world."

June 18, 1910

Chicago, IL
"Gunthers Win From Kansas City Giants. - The Gunthers defeated the Kansas City Giants last Saturday, in their Chicago debut at Gunther Park, by the score of 6 to 2. Timely hitting in the fifth inning sewed up the game and also retired Hardy. Dawson, who succeeded him, pitched great ball, not a hit being registered off his delivery. Fast fielding by the Giants staved off more runs several times and was easily the feature of the game. Rugar's pitching also was of high class variety."

June 25, 1910

Kansas City, KS
"More About That Mitchell-Smith Contract. - Sporting Editor The Freeman: In your issue of June 4, 1910, the following article appeared: "Kansas Giants Will Not Stand by Contract. - Sporting Editor the Freeman: I wish to state to the public that I had a contract with Tobe Smith, manager of the Kansas City, Kansas Giants to play a series of four games, namely: May 14, 15, 16 and 17. We played the first game and then it began to rain. I stayed with my men until my contract was out. When I demanded my money Mr. Smith abolutely refused to pay on account of not having good weather. Now, this is the kind of men that are hurting the game, and I thought it was my duty to let the public know what they can expect from a contract with this individual. He is the most unreliable man that I ever did business with. I also had a contract with the Royal Giants of Kansas City, Missouri for the following week. The weather was very bad and the gate receipts fell far below the guarantee, but the management paid us in full without a word. I simply make the statement to set the public right in regard to the baseball proposition in Kansas City (Signed) Col. Edward F. Mitchell, Manager and Owner Minneapolis Keystones. A careful analysis of the foregoing statement will show only two things. The one is that Mr. Mitchell was greatly displeased with the treatment which he received at my hands during the series of games above referred to, while he was evidently very highly pleased with that which was accorded him by the management of the Royal Giants. However, one man's pleasure of displeasure at the action of another is not always a safe criterion by which to judge of the merits or demerits of his controversy; but in order to judge a given contention intelligently it is necessary to know the facts upon which the disputants found their respective claims. And these facts can only become known to strangers to the controversy by being fully and accurately disclosed by those who know them. If, therefore, I have laid down the correct rule for guidance, Mr. Mitchell's statement is wholly devoid of everything which would enable its readers to know anything concerning the merits or demerits of our misunderstanding. Nor would I complain of this if his statement were not both false and defamatory so far as my treatment of him was concerned. And in order that my readers may know the truth I must be permitted to briefly state the facts, which were as follows: Mr. Mitchell and I had a written contract for a series of four baseball games between his club and mine. That contract provided that the games should be played, and that when they should be played he should receive at least fifty dollars for the palying of each of them. The first game of the series was played and the other three were not because it rained and Mr. Mitchell refused to require his men to paly baseball in the mud. There was no intention either expressed or implied on my part to pay any money to Mr. Mitchell unless the games were actually played. At the proper time I told Mr. Mitchell that there was fifty dollars due him under our contract and I offered to pay him forthwith. He declared that he was entitled to receive two hundred dollars from me, notwithstanding his failure to play the last three games of the series. Our entire agreement in regard to the series of games was in writing, and I invited him to read the contract. He did so, but still we could not agree upon the proper construction to be placed upon its terms. I submitted the contract to my personal attorney and then to another lawyer, an ex-judge, who is generally reputed to be one of the best civil lawyers in either of the Kansas Cities, and they both said that Mr. Mitchell was entitled to receive but $50 under the contract in view of the fact that only one game had been played. Mr. Mitchell still denied the correctness of my position, whereupon I asked him to take legal advice. He refused to do so. I then offered to submit the controversy to a commission of any five reputable lawyers that Mr. Mitchell might select in either of the two Kansas Cities and to pay for the opinion if it chanced to be against me - he to pay for it if it chanced to be in my favor. He refused this offer also. While doubting the sincerity of his claim and acting in open disregard of the advice of my personal attorney, I offered to pay Mr. Mitchell $100, so that I might retain his friendship, as I thought. He accepted the $100 in payment of the games and I thought he was entirely satisfied until he sued me for another one hundred dollars and attached money to pay the claim in Kansas City, Missouri on May 29, 1910. I met the issue promptly by filing a forth-coming bond for the release of my money and prepared for trial. In order to begin his action Mr. Mitchell employed two of the best young attorneys in Kansas City, Missouri. He was fighting me on neutral ground. He had sufficient assurance that a judgement against me would be promptly paid. And yet when he was required by order of court to give security for costs on account of being a non-resident of Missouri, and to give a gilt-edged attachment bond, he promptly dismissed his suit. The action of Mr. Mitchell in discontinuing a fight so bravely(?) begun can indicate but one of two things, namely: His lawyers either construed the contract between us as my attorneys did, or else he was afraid of his cause of action despite their advice. But to me it makes little difference what it was that caused Mr. Mitchell to desist from his efforts to have his contention upheld. Indeed, for my part he need not have desisted, for if I thought that I had not already overpaid him a full $50 I would voluntarily pay another $100 to Mr. Mitchell on the theory that his construction of the contract was correct. But until I am conviced that I have been unfair in my dealings with my accuser I shall leave it to an unbiased public to say whether it is men of my stripe or that of Brother Mitchell's that are hurting the great national pastime. Nor shall I hesitate to intrust that same public with the decision of the question of my reliability in the face of the Colonel's unfounded insinuation that I will not do to trust. And our good friend adds: "And I thought it was my duty to let the public know what they can expect from a contract with this individual." In commenting on the foregoing extract from Mr Mitchell's statement I cannot refrain from expressing the thought that the person or persons who study the facts herin set out will be irresistibly impelled to the conclusion that the Colonel not only secured a square deal from me, but received $50 more than he was entitled to receive from me under the contract. And if the gentleman will only remember that I am conducting a business organization for profit, instead of a charitable institution for the distribution of alms, he would doubtless find cause for pride and congratulation, instead of vexation and complaint, in the outcome of his dealings with me. I am respectfully, Tobe Smith. - 430 Washington Boulevard, Kansas City, Kansas."

June 26, 1910

Chicago, IL
"The best game of baseball of the season at the Leland Giants Baseball Park, 69th and Halstead Street, Kansas City Giants vs. Leland Gaints, Sunday, June 26th. Game called at 3:30p.m. Come early and get a good seat. Battery Frank Wickware and Bruce Petway for the Leland Giants, Bill Lindsay and William Tenney for Kansas City Giants."

Kansas City, Kansas
"Kansas City Giants. - Kansas City Giants were scheduled to play a series of four games with the Minneapolis Keystones. Rain prevented all but one. Score, 6 to 5 in favor of the Giants. Linsey and Teenie, battery for Kansas City. In Winning mood the Kansas City Giants played the Prathers, a strong white team of the City League, five games and took all of them."

"Mr. Smith, owner of the Giants, is much pleased with their showing. Red Foster is holding first sack down in great form. George neal, thid base; Bingo DeMoss, second base; Frog Lindsey, shortstop, are also playing in great form. - Mr. Smith says that he is more than pleased with his pitching staff - Bill Lindsey, Walter Taylor, Oscar Chamberlain and Roy Dorsey - the latter a young pitcher, who has been making good. - Outfield is perfect with M. Lindsey, W. Wilkerson, and A. Jackson."

June 29, 1910

Chicago, IL
"Gunthers Rap Giants, 9-1. - Take Lead in Series with Kansas City Team, Two Games to One. - The Gunthers defeated the Kansas City Giants last Wednesday, 9 to 1, in the third game of their series, the games now standing two to one in favor of the local team. Bradshaw allowed the colored team but two hits, while Norman was rapped for nine. The same teams played Thursday at Gunther Park, Earl Rugar being scheduled to pitch against Lindsay, the best of the visitors' pitchers."

June 30, 1910

Chicago, IL
"Parker Breaks Up Game. - Clouts Double and Triple for Gunthers, Beating Giants, 2-1. - The Gunthers made it three out of four from the Kansas City Giants last Thursday, defeating the visitors 2 to 1 by a rally in the ninth. Jay Parker batted in the victory, tying the score with a triple in the eighth and winning the game with a double in the ninth. The game was a pitchers' battle between Rugar and Lindsay."

July 1, 1910

Chicago, IL
"The last game of the series was played Friday at Gunther Park."

July 4, 1910

Chicago, IL
"Kansas City Giants Go Down. - A large crowd gathered at Riverside Park to see the Kansas City, Kansas Giants go down. They were defeated by the Oklahoma Monarchs by a score of 5 to 0. Shinn Norman of the Chicago Giants is now pitching for the Kansas City Giants. He was hit hard by the Oklahoma City Monarchs. Baby Webb for the Monarchs took it easy and let the Giants down with only two hits. Batteries for the Kansas City Giants were Shinn Norman and Tenny. For the Monarchs Baby Webb and Bolden. The first game of the double-header on July 4 was won by the Kansas City Giants by a score of 4 to 0. Batteries for the Giants were Bill Lindsey and Tenny. For the Monarchs Skinner and Bolden. The Monarchs won the last game of the double-header by a score of 5 to 0. The game was full of sensational plays all the way through. Boone was in great form and held the Giants to only three hits. A large crowd witnessed the games. Batteries for the Giants: Dorsey and Tenny. For the Monarchs Boone and Bolden. The Oklahoma Monarchs will play some of the best clubs in the country soon."

July 23, 1910

Chicago, IL
"On Monday of this week the Chicago Baseball League passed a rule barring games between its members and all visiting colored ball clubs from now on, the rule being made to include the Cuban clubs that have been playing around the circuit the past two years. The rule will work very badly against the Stars of Cuba, who figured on playing on the Chicago League Circuit after the Cuban Stars left the city. This action means that the Chicago Leaguers will not play visiting colored teams any more in the future."